Why Patrice Brown (AKA #TeacherBae) Is The Subject Of A Dumb-Ass “Debate,” Explained » VSB

Featured, Pop Culture, Theory & Essay

Why Patrice Brown (AKA #TeacherBae) Is The Subject Of A Dumb-Ass “Debate,” Explained

Who is Patrice Brown? 

Patrice Brown is an elementary school teacher in Atlanta. She is also the muse for a verse about “Nicey from Atlanta” from a song that Drake hasn’t produced yet. And in it Drake will lament about that one time he was in a Panera Bread in Buckhead and he met this teacher he wanted to settle down with, but after a couple promising dates she didn’t answer his texts even though he saw the read receipts. So he gave her nickname (Nicey Poo) to a flight attendant named Lisa.

And the song will be called “Grading On A Curve.” Because while Drake does thick women, he doesn’t do subtlety.

So I take it that she’s attractive?

She is. And not “That 11th grade French teacher Miss Johnson is really cute” attractive, but “Beyonce cast as an inner-city teacher on an episode of Criminal Minds” attractive.

So basically she’s reached the rarest level on the attractive hierarchy, which is “unrealistically attractive for her occupation” attractive?

Yes. She’s basically the female equivalent of every tech support guy or barista The Rock keeps playing in movies. Like, come on, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson! You’re waaaaaaay too big to be making that mango smoothie, man. We don’t believe you; you need more people.

Got it. So why is she in the news? While I’m sure she’s an attractive woman, I’m also sure she’s not the only attractive woman who happens to be a schoolteacher. 

A couple days ago, a few pictures of Brown at work went viral. While many marveled over and appreciated her looks, some felt that both the pictures and the clothes she wore in the pictures were inappropriate for the classroom. And this started a dumb-ass internet debate.

Inappropriate? How so?

Well, Brown is very curvy. And judging from the pictures that were circulated, she seems to enjoy wearing clothes that, um, fit. This struck some people as unbecoming of a teacher, with their rationale(s) being that she’s wearing club clothes in the classroom and that she’d distract the students from learning.

Which, of course, is both true and bullshit.

How so?

It’s true that she could wear some of those outfits to the club. But I’m certain if you peeked your head inside of the other classrooms in her school — and the classrooms in the school nearest you — you’d find other teachers (male and female) wearing clothes that could also be worn to happy hour. In fact, as someone who was a high school teacher for three years, “Can I wear this to happy hour later?” was a deciding factor with like 90% of my outfits. Because your game night clothes and your teaching clothes are often the same clothes. Because teacher salaries. (And because teachers do a lot of drinking.)

And, as far as her being a distraction, will some of the students be distracted by her? Yes! But that’s the job of a 4th grader. Be distracted by random shit. If it wasn’t Ms. Brown’s curves, it would be Ms. Brown’s enunciation. Or the sound Ms Brown’s shoes makes. Or the weather outside. Or what Janaya Robinson said to Kenny Richmond in homeroom 40 minutes ago. Or Dej Loaf. Or meatloaf. And not meatloaf the food, but a faded sticker of Meatloaf the musician on the back of a chair. And eventually, they get bored with whatever’s distracting them, and either decide to pay attention to the teacher or find something else to distract them. Trust me, the 4th graders in Patrice Brown’s classroom give less fucks about her looks than any of us do.

The “problem” here isn’t that Brown is dressing inappropriately. It’s that she’s dressing inappropriately for her figure. If she were less curvy and a bit plainer-looking and did the exact same things, this would not be a story.

So basically the charges of inappropriateness are from people uncomfortable with her body? 

In a nutshell. Thing is, what these people don’t realize — or realize but don’t want to admit — is that it doesn’t matter. A woman as pretty and curvy as Brown could go to work rocking a potato sack — shit, she could rock a potato sack with the potatoes still in it — and she’d still get attention. And still be considered a distraction. Fathers of her students would still have perfect attendance at PTA meetings. Maybe she can dress more conservatively if she desires to, but there’s absolutely nothing she can do to “hide” herself. Which I imagine might be a gift and a curse for her.

What’s next for her?

Hopefully she has an administration and school board that supports her through all of this. And maybe she can use her newfound popularity as #TeacherBae to start a multi-city happy hour tour with Jeremy Meeks (#PrisonBae). And this tour would be managed by Irvin Randle (#MrStealYourGrandma). Who they eventually fire because he kept sneaking into her luggage and stealing her jeans.

Damon Young

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB. He is also a columnist for GQ.com And he's working on a book of essays to be published by Ecco (HarperCollins). Damon is busy. He lives in Pittsburgh, and he really likes pancakes. Reach him at damon@verysmartbrothas.com. Or don't. Whatever.

  • YeaSoh

    Atlanta strikes again

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      Community Troy better have an episode about this.

    • Other_guy13

      Leave us out of this…i support her…and will be enrolling my future kids in her school

      • Hilarious.

      • Oluseyi

        And have perfect attendance at PTA?

    • KaytotheBee

      I was waiting on this. It was a topic on the radio this morning (I’m in ATL). I’m in HR and have seen it all when it comes to the way people dress in the workplace. Some can walk out the work door and right into The Blue Flame.

  • miss t-lee

    I just wanna know why folks stealing your pictures off of social media and making a whole thing about it became a wave.

    Folks gotta leave this lady alone. Let her teach her kids in whatever she wants to wear, in peace.

    • Illumina

      i think it’s losing the fine art of minding one’s own business.

      I guess people with no lives or bills to pay spend hours combing through people’s social media profiles for “evidence”.

      Does she have a huge social media presence? How did this even get started?

      • miss t-lee

        I’m not sure how it got started. All I know is the pics I first saw on twitter, looked like they were taken (screenshot) from her IG page.
        Someone made a comment…and then boom. This was Sunday night…and before you know it, viral.

    • Epsilonicus

      I operate in a way that says all social media is public. Actually anything you put on the internet

      • cakes_and_pies

        Public doesn’t necessitate a need for discussion. People just love being offended and talking about public stuff when most don’t care.

        • Epsilonicus

          When you put it in public, you can’t control what happens next

          • cakes_and_pies

            Yes I can. I just don’t talk about it. I’m not online for likes and IG hearts.

            • Epsilonicus

              Again, if you don’t want folks sharing it, don’t put it online.

              Expecting privacy online is asinine

              • cakes_and_pies

                Of course, I just don’t get people looking to be offended by dumb stuff.

            • Blueberry01

              You actually can’t. That’s why the government and other police agencies can (and will) use anything you post on social media or this here blog.

      • miss t-lee

        Makes sense.

      • Blueberry01

        Exactly.

  • HouseOfBonnets

    If only her critics put as much energy into changing our current education system as they are into her wardrobe…..

    • Your Mama

      ..or working out their damn selves.. i imagine those that have an issue with #teacherbae sitting behind a computer eating cheetos, shaped like spongebob.

      • PDL – Cape Girl Shero

        I was okay until I got to SpongeBob. Cackled sooo loud. Whew!

      • charisma_supreme

        I didnt wanna go here, but glad mama went here for me

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      That would require teaching their own kids. Lotta parents ain’t bout dat.

      “I’m a drop D’quavious off for 13 years. He better be smart when I pick him back up.”

      • HouseOfBonnets

        Sounds about right.

      • I disagree, but only semantically. The teacher, as the educational specialist, is responsible for instilling knowledge and academic habits in kids.

        Part of that instillation is having tough conversations with parents when things aren’t working. Most teachers don’t do that because it’s easier to fail a child than to work with the parents, especially when most teachers are white and are working with black children.

        • Brooklyn_Bruin

          I disagree heavily.

          The parent is the primary teacher, period, end of story, close the book, put it back on the shelf.

          Not finna hotep this post up, but we’re in our current predicaments precisely because we’ve outsourced a parent’s most crucial task to outsiders. An educator is an expert on teaching, but the parent is the expert on the child.

          In my hood, the parents end up teaching their kids what is “important ” anyway…

          • Question

            This. And especially in the black community, we have to dead this notion that somehow teachers are ultimately responsible (or that anyone other than parents bare primary responsibility). No.

            D’quavious (stickin’ with the example) is disciplined and intelligent. That’s on you, parents.
            D’quavious is obnoxious and undisciplined. That’s on you, parents.
            D’quavious is smart but lazy. That’s on you, parents.
            D’quavious thinks he can go off on a teacher without repercussions. That’s on you, parents.
            D’quavious may not be the smartest kid, but he’s well behaved and tries hard. That’s on you, parents.
            D’quavious is headed to the Ivy League/a good state school/community college and then transfer/a trade program/to prison. That’s on you, parents.

            • I disagree with you.

              If a child is messing up, all the adults in that child’s life is accountable, teacher included. If the teacher struggles with holding D’quavious accountable for his behavior, that’s a dereliction of professional duty and they ought to be held accountable.

              • Question

                I think you may be misunderstanding me. I’m not saying teachers are without responsibility, I just don’t think they should be held accountable as the primary responsible party, if that makes sense. Its why I bolded primary in my initial response to you.

                In your other response to me – I totally agree that the alignment between teachers and parents lead to the best outcomes.

                • I see what you’re saying. I think then, if we say that parents have primary responsibility (can you teach me how to bold words?), then we have to talk about what results we expect from parents and teachers, and what responses are necessary when each party doesn’t produce results.

                  Because one of the greatest challenges of teachers is navigating that penumbra. From my experience- state laws generally allow schools great leeway to force parents to work for their kid’s success. Also, the vast majority of parents want the best for their kids and are either too poor or lack the knowledge to produce results without the assistance of an educational specialist.

              • Blueberry01

                I don’t think they’re assuming that D’Q had Ms. Becky. They assume they had some version of Ms. Brown.

                • The best manager I ever had was a Ms. Becky who taught me to teach, held me accountable for my mistakes, and either got other Becky’s on the same page with social justice or fired them. Swiftly.

                  Likewise, I’ve seen many Ms. Browns do grievous damage to a child’s education.

                  • Blueberry01

                    So, the point is that a good teacher is a good teacher is a good teacher – irrespective of race. To this, I agree. However, a teacher cannot manage, teach, or hold you accountable for things you did not first learn at home.

                    But, again, not the point of the initial argument.

                    • I disagree on that. A child may not learn to work completely independently at home (I’m thinking homework). A teacher can teach and model the executive behaviors that make that necessary. Do you have all your materials? Do you have access to the tech you need? If not, what do you need to do to get access? How can I support? Do you have a quiet place to work at home? If not, how do you need to spend your study hall?

                    • Maxine Shaw

                      They hammer that in you very, VERY hard in teacher school (said very sarcastically). You must model the behavior you want to see in your students. Why? Because you might be the only person in the child’s life who does. That’s a heavy burden to carry some days, but it is what it is.

                    • Agree on modeling behavior.

                      I never give homework over breaks because I’m resting during breaks; I tell my kids to sleep late, eat bad food, and come back when break is over, ready to work.

                    • Blueberry01

                      How is asking if they have the appropriate materials, resources, or an optimal study environment an example of “holding them accountable for their mistakes” or “getting the other Becky’s on the same page with social justice or firing them”?

                      When I taught high school, the verbalized (both to the entire class and those students who I knew were in vulnerable positions at home) expectation was that if they did not have the resources, materials, and/or appropriate study environment, then they better avail themselves to the free computer and Internet access, as well as study space, in our school library and/or my classroom. (And in most cases, these students would come to me first asking me when they could stop by either place.)

                      So, I wouldn’t consider that “teaching” as much as it is informing a student of his/her options, and how to achieve a goal despite their personal circumstances at home.

                      Now, if D’Q didn’t DO his project, even though all of the resources were at school, and thought I’d let it slide….sike.

                    • 1) Asking your students if they have the things they need to produce academic results shows you consider their home and material environment when you teach. That is an exemplar of social justice.

                      2) If students proactively came to you and told you what materials they were lacking, then I know you were fire in the classroom. Kids were willing to be vulnerable in front of you.

                      3) As a college counselor, I work with teachers in training them in how to impart the non-cognitive skills of advocacy into their students. This behavior needs to be consistently taught and assessed. So if D’Q didn’t do his project despite the wealth of his resources, I’d ask his teacher two questions. One, what data or documentation do you have that proves D’Q knew of the resources available to him? Two, what data or documentation do you have that proves that his parents knew what resources were available to him?

                    • Blueberry01

                      1) We’d call that “enabling” or “coddling” in the high schools that I’ve taught in. We strived to create an environment similar to some sort of post-secondary experience (e.g. college, military, workforce, vocational training). Your professor or supervisor would never ask you if you had a “quiet place to study”. That would be expected of you to know BEFORE you got there, so we did our best to mimic this expectation.

                      Social justice is based upon equity, not just thoughtful consideration of their home life. So, an example of that in this case would be to provide the resources (as we both stated we had or would) and ensured that they were aware of them. Me simply asking, and not providing the necessities, is not helpful.

                      2)? #HotLikeFire ?? Thanks.

                      3) Can you provide an example “non-cognitive skills of advocacy”? Are you saying that you’d like students to learn how to advocate for themselves better?

                      To your second question, my response would be to show you the written project decription – given to every student – which outlined the nature of the project as well as the resources available for it. I’d also indicate the various days in class which I verbalized the expectations and/or had personal conversations with D’Q.

                      As for the third, most schools (and most communities) have a library with free Internet and quiet study rooms. So, I’d find it difficult to believe that someone (older than a high school student) didn’t know that either of those two places existed. Further, I’d show the parent the same project description document – as well as reminding them that they or their child can access another copy using our online grading portal.

                      Bottomline: we didn’t baby our kids and as a result, they flourished. Things only got bad when certain administrators started hindering their ability to be successful (e.g. illegally withholding resources, intentionally putting kids in incorrect classes).

                    • 1) Modeling and making sure kids have what they need to work is effective teaching, not coddling. Effective professors, college administrators, and supervisors would also ask you if you had everything you needed to produce quality work as well. A lot of of my views on this is based in social cognitive theory, which argues that people learn best when they see a behavior or practice consistently modeled for them by a significant other (http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev.psych.52.1.1)

                      Students who have never written a paper, or never learned to organize their binders, need teachers to consistently model those behaviors for them. Even as a college counselor, I have to do this. I had one alum who, for weeks, was sick with a sinus infection. But he’d never been to the doctor himself. I had to model that behavior for him- how to use his health insurance to find a doctor and schedule an appointment. I don’t see that as coddling, but teaching.

                      2) Why’d you stop teaching?

                      3) Non-cognitive skills normally what we call “character.” Having grit, gratitude, self awareness, self esteem, etc. These traits are strong predictors of whether or not a child will be successful in school and will persist, and also are strong predictors as to whether or not a child will learn the cognitive (behaviors that led to learning) traits that led to academic success.

                      So if D’Q was self-aware enough to know he’d need resources to complete his paper, he’d talk with his parents and teachers to ensure that he got them. This is irrespective of age, though my own personal bias has me thinking of 9th graders (I was grade level chair and AP for 9th grade for most of my admin years).

                      If D’Q lacked the non-cognitive trait of self-awareness, then he would not know, or it would not occur to him, that he did not have the materials needed to complete the paper. A strong teacher would catch this; it would be manifest in academic product. And after finding the root cause, the teacher would work with both student and parent to make sure that D’Q learns self awareness by modeling via social cognitive theory.

                    • Blueberry01

                      1) I’ve never had a college professor ask me if I had the appropriate materials to complete a project. EVER. The expectation was that you learned the material, mastered how to use the resources, and if you did not understand either, you would utilize the plethora of resources available to you. Then again, I went to a large PWI on the East Coast for undergrad so I’m not sure if this is regional specific.

                      So, I model self-awareness, self-regulation, and independence in my classroom.

                      2) Short answer: I became DISGUSTED with the fact that administrators (in various school settings that I worked in) made decisions (e.g. misallocation of funds, intentionally putting students in incorrect classes, stifling the students on advanced tracks, etc.) that did not have the best interests of our (African American and Latino) students in mind.

                      3) Yes, I’m familiar with non-cognitive skills but you initially stated advocacy, as opposed to self-awareness, so I didn’t know what you meant.

                      As for my teaching style, I definitely embed those into my lessons, regardless of the student. I’ve taught 9th – 12th throughout my tenure and they all have the same expectation of being responsible for their own learning.

                      Honestly, I can’t think of a student who struggled with seeking out resources, if they weren’t available to them at home. If anything, they’d do anything to hide the fact that they were poor. All in all, I had students who wanted to learn, be successful, and did what it took in order to do so.

          • Junegirl627

            Nah B. There is a person who is getting paid 60 70 80K a year and went through 7-8 years of specialized higher education to be able to teach lil BB long division.

            When it comes to education it is a parents job to provide discipline, supply all the necessary materials, give back up, to support and to help a child study lessons learned in the classroom. It’s a parents job to make sure a child is fed and well rested for class. But the Teacher is the primary educator of learned materials.

            • cakes_and_pies

              You have your child for 4-5 whole years before you drop them off to school. The parents are the foundation, not the teacher and ain’t nobody making 80k for teaching 4th grade.

              • Junegirl627

                actually yeah teach are making 80K depending on the school they teach at. An educator with their doctorate or Masters in a stem subject who is tenured and been on the job for over 5-10 years and also works after school or summer school will make that much money.

                • cakes_and_pies

                  You have to factor in cost of living and location. 80k in New York City is the same as 35k in Montgomery, Alabama. A Master’s in education are going away and educator certificates means you don’t have to pay teachers anything and tenure? Not down here.

                  I seriously doubt this chick is making 60-80k. You’re child spends more time with you that it does with the teacher. The whole hands off approach to leaving it all up to the teacher is a part of the problem why Black children lag in the education.

                  When I didn’t understand something in school my Mother didn’t say “Well she makes XYZ she needs to teach better.” She took it upon herself to help me learn, not shove the issue back on the teacher.

              • If that’s the case, we have to right off tons of children because either their parents were screwups or never learnt the habits of formal education. That bothers my sense of mercy and grace regarding children; your argument is that they do indeed inherit the sins of their mothers and fathers.

                All students deserve a fair shot, no matter where they start.

                • cakes_and_pies

                  I don’t understand why I would have to write off the child because their parents were screw-ups.
                  Whoever spends the most time with the child is responsible for teaching and instilling knowledge in a child. Everything is not learned from a book in a classroom setting. Relying solely on persons who only spend maybe 40 hours/week split between another 30 students per class is straight up dumb.

                  • Do you feel a child who comes from a poor home environment deserves the support to have a shot of attaining a life of choice and meaning?

                    Because from what I’m reading from you, you don’t think so if the default response is to lay everything at the parent’s feet.

                    • cakes_and_pies

                      Yeah they deserve it. That’s an entirely different scenario where the teacher is also the pseudo parent. But I wouldn’t say “Hey teacher, I know you’re limited in resources because you teach at a school with kids coming from a poor environment, are most likely untrained for this type of situation, and you’re also limited on how much you can help a child, but my kid id still dumb and it’s your fault.”
                      How fair is that?

                    • It is the teacher’s fault. Basic knowledge is measurable and it’s the teacher’s responsibility to make sure his or her students know it. If not that, then what are teachers responsible for?

                    • cakes_and_pies

                      I agree to disagree.

                    • this is an amazingly superficial analysis. the reason we have school lunches, and now school breakfasts, and dinners, is because it was discovered that this mentality doesn’t work, and only serves to reinforce disparities. i have 200 students this semester. one of them is a 10th grader who, unfortunately has the reading and writing abilities of a 2nd grader. i am not sure if he has a learning exceptionality, or if he’s just under-educated. unfortunately, there is little i can do for this boy besides steer him towards programs that help with that elementary level of literacy. i have no idea how to educate a child whose literacy level is so low, i didn’t go to school for it, i’ve never taught it, and it’s a specialized skill for which i’m unqualified. to expect me to get him to a point where he can read primary source documents from millenia ago, or write a 5 paragraph essay based on analyzing historical documents is just a ludicrous thing to suggest.

                    • A strong instructional leader would hold you accountable for the young man’s growth then, not his absolute results. If he’s a sophomore reading on a second grade level, he’s not going to earn a college ready score on ACT reading. But he can and has to grow, and I don’t think that’s something you’d disagree with. I mean, are you willing to tell his parents that you can’t teach him, and that there’s nothing you can do for him?

                • Question

                  Ahh…I see where you’re coming from. Even in these situations, in an ideal world, I don’t think the primary responsibility should be on teacher (note: in an ideal world). In these instances of crap parenting, which does happen, a lot, I would hope that teachers would have the ability to lean on other supporting professionals who specialize in these cases (e.g. psychological counselors, social workers etc.). Again, note – all of this in an ideal world.

                  I think part of the larger problem is that in many ways these things are seen as separate and distinct, but somehow we place this undue burden on teachers to wrap it all up nicely in a bow and fix it all.

                  • I mean, I’m always wary of using my personal experience as how the world ought to be. But 80% of parents I work with- and I work in rural, dirt poor Arkansas- are wonderful and hard working and cooperative. Another 15% need careful communication and management to get their children to work, but I’ve had high success rates by making everything about data- weekly in person contact, behavior trackers, and homework logs.

                    It’s the last 5% that doesn’t care if their kids are in gangs or are actively abusing them. Tragic, but my day to day of working with poor black children is filled with joy, not tragedy.

                    • Nik White

                      Glad to hear that Man!

                    • Question

                      Its uplifting to hear that the in your experience, the % that don’t care is 5% and not 50%.

              • Junegirl627

                Plus what about kids in foster care, kids of parents who don’t speak english, Kids of parents with learning disabilites or drop outs?

                My best friend is a pediatric nurse but her father bounced when she was a few months and her mother spoke no english and only had a 3rd grade education because it was a waste of money to educate girls outside of basic counting where she came from. Not only did our teachers teach her english, but her mom got her education because my best friend and I would go home and teach her mom what we learned in school that day. If we needed help with our homework we went to my mom.

                Now this is a lady who reads the newpaper while drinking her coffee every morning and ended up getting her GED a year after we graduated high school because great teachers did their jobs and we florished.

                • cakes_and_pies

                  “If we needed help with our homework we went to my mom.” That’s what I’m saying. You learn from outside of the school as well.
                  You’re talking about extenuating circumstances. This story is about a plain old 4th grade teacher.
                  Of course a teacher would teach someone to learn English, how else would they be able to teach them?
                  The two couples one single person I know who have foster kids, teach their foster children. I know that’s not always the case, but the default isn’t foster parents are they don’t give an isht.
                  You don’t stick anybody with special needs children, that’s a specialty that should be paid well.

              • A-Marie

                It depends on where you live. Some of my colleagues are pulling six figures with a Masters, 15 years of experience, and a couple after school clubs. DMV area.

                • cakes_and_pies

                  That has more to due with cost of living.

                  • A-Marie

                    It’s still six figures…which gives you a comfortable living in the DC area. Far from poverty level…and above the median household income for some areas.

                • Question

                  Is this private or public institutions?

                  • Epsilonicus

                    Public. Private schools pay less

                    • Question

                      Word? I didn’t know that. Why is that?

                    • Epsilonicus

                      1. Private schools are not unionized

                      2. There is a glut of people wanting to work their since they don’t have the same issues with kids so it drives down the price of labor.

                      3. On average, private school teachers are less educated than public school teachers

                    • GenevaGirl

                      #3 That depends on the caliber of the school. My alma mater, which was just listed as the top private school in my state, has Ph.Ds on staff and a good portion of the teachers have master’s degrees. The parents, of course, are paying for their expertise.

                      Don’t confuse private schools with parochial schools where teachers are often paid much less.

                    • Epsilonicus

                      I attended, taught, and consult for private schools. Even in many of the best ones, you are going to see many teachers with just a bachelor’s. Now the leadership will have higher degrees. Bachelors may be fine in most cases if you are just teaching. Not a judgement on quality of teacher (in my opinion you can build effective teachers if your school had rigorous professional development programming).

                • Epsilonicus

                  Teachers can make up to 115k in Baltimore. Nothing to do with cost of living

                  • C Rowley

                    Um, I teach in Baltimore (almost 20 years now). What teachers are making 115k in the public school (private even)?!

                    • Epsilonicus

                      My bad. It is between 103-108k (basic master teacher – department head). That is still a damn good salary in a city where the median income is around 40k.

                  • Blueberry01

                    But Baltimore city is more expensive to live in than any of its adjacent counties.

                    • Epsilonicus

                      Nope. Baltimore has a higher property tax than its surrounding counties. Housing in the surrounding counties have a higher valuation than homes in the city. Add in the added transportation costs (limited public transit, higher fuel prices), etc it is more expensive to live in surrounding counties. Now Baltimore is pricier than some rural counties in the west and Eastern Shore

                    • Blueberry01

                      So, you’re saying that the rent, utilities, grocery prices, gas prices, and public transit (which I define as cost of living) is higher in Pikesville (Baltimore County) than Baltimore City?

                      I’m not talking about property value, I’m talking about how much money comes out of my check to live.

                    • Epsilonicus

                      Go to USA Cities website. Average mortgage costs and rental costs are higher in Pikesville than Baltimore City. Throw in increased transportation costs (living in Pikesville you most likely need to have a car because few buses run out there. That means more driving aka higher fuel and repair costs), you are spending more to live out there. Now you personally nay think it’s worth it. This isn’t a judgement on what’s the better choice. Just that it’s more expensive to live in the surrounding counties than in the city.

                    • Blueberry01

                      I’ll do you one better, I’ll provide a real life example. My brother and his family used to live in a 2.5 level, two-bedroom/two-bathroom townhome at The Residence at Waterstone in Pikesville, built in 2002. According to their website, the minimum average yearly lease of this style of home is $1829 for an average of 1490 square feet. Each unit also comes with a balcony/patio, one-car garage and two visitor spaces outside of their home, carpeted floors, gourmet kitchens, access to fitness center, tennis court, swimming pool, business, and media center.

                      So, it’s about $1.22/square foot.

                      When I perused Trulia.com for the same style (2BR/2Bath bi- or tri-level townhome, built within the last 15 years) in Baltimore city, I came up with five results in:

                      Downtown ($3869/1382 square feet = $2.79/square feet)

                      South Baltimore ($2280/1103 square feet = $2.06/square feet);

                      Fells Point ($2230/1193 square foot = $1.86/square foot);

                      West Federal Hill ($1895/1200 square feet = $1.57/square foot); and

                      Jonestown ($2080/2002 square feet = $1.04/square feet)

                      So, with the exception of Jonestown, none of the other results are cheaper per square foot than Pikesville. Also, none of the aforementioned sites include all of the amenities than Pikesville offers, either. Jonestown also, unfortunately, had the highest number of crimes reported within a radial mile of its address (875 crimes reported), within the last 30 days.

                      Lastly, you need to factor in other costs of living like gas/public transportation, food, and utilities which cost MORE in the city than in the suburbs – partly due to increased demand and less supply.

                    • Epsilonicus

                      It’s bit an apples to bananas
                      comparison. You compared a single place in Pikesville to 4 of the most gentrifying and overly priced neighborhoods in Baltimore. They are overwhelming white compared to the entire city. Also, most “new” housing in Baltimore is apartments (a few exceptions in the neighborhoods you listed). Otherwise majority is older housing stock, whether reno or nah. I never said you can’t find one place that is cheaper in the county than a place in Baltimore. I said on average you can find cheaper housing in Baltimore (unless you want to pay 3500 per month living in luxury apartments which why the Downtown prices you listed are so high bc there is tons of luxury apts built down there). Your BGE rate is not going to be higher in the city than county. You will pay a slightly higher water bill. And depending on your grocery store, you are gonna spend more or less on food in Baltimore. More if you are doing Whole Foods and Wegmans, less if you are doing Aldi’s, Walmart etc. But that’s a choice folk in the county have also.

                      When people say Baltimore is more expensive, they are saying it’s more expensive in the neighborhood they want to be in. There is tons of more affordable housing in safe neighborhoods. But those neighborhoods are much more middle class/working class and Black so the real estate market is not as hot there.

                    • Blueberry01

                      It was more of an apples to apples comparison because I wanted to find something EXACTLY similar in Baltimore to my brother’s spot in Pikesville to show you that living in Pikesville is cheaper – when all things are being considered.

                      But, of course, you can choose to live wherever you want for how ever much you want. Cheap or expensive, big or small, it’s totally up to you.

              • Tiffany

                Call that out.

                • cakes_and_pies

                  My teacher friends love and hate the summer because it’s time off from the classroom, but parents don’t encourage or care what their kids do during that time and they come back dumber than when they left.

              • Blueberry01

                Places with higher costs of living (DC, NYC, San Fran) pay higher.

            • Brooklyn_Bruin

              When Taquaneesha, aka Tay Tay, needs help with her sentence diagramming, somebody at home better get on Google and brush up.

              Because we’ve been fools to think that the school is actually a factory. Her teacher would ideally be able to explain the topic on the perfect way, but that’s not even the real world for rich 2520’s.

              I get that it’s more work for the parents.

              And?

              We have already seen what happens when parents stand by idly and let the system be the primary educator.

              We done tried it their way.
              It’s not working out.

              Let me hotep someplace else though

              • Junegirl627

                The fact that You and Tay Tay know that she needs help with her sentence diagramming is because it was introduced by her primary educator and as the secondary/ supplemental educator in your childs life yes you need to brush up on you grammar.

            • Ice Jones

              7-8 years is a thing of the past. i just got out of working in the school system and most teachers only have bachelor’s degrees and if your child is at a charter school, then forget it; there’s a 9/10 chance that his/her teacher comes from TFA or a similar program, which basically just means that they could have a bachelor’s in needlepoint but if they are willing to sit through 6 weeks of summer training in one of the worst schools in the district, then they will be responsible for your kid. it sucks, but thems the breaks.

              also, if you can point me in the direction of a school paying 80K a year then i’d gladly go back to the bullshit i dealt with for 6 years.

              • Junegirl627

                disagree but gotta get going. I respect your experience but it isn’t really the norm.

              • Tiffany

                Your experience is definitely the norm.

              • have taught in 3 diff schools in 3 diff metro areas, in 3 diff states. this is definitely the norm.

              • HouseOfBonnets

                One thing I do like about the charter I chose for the wonder twins (because Cps wasn’t an option especially if all I had were neighborhood schools) is the fact that parent involvement is a requirement and heavily encouraged for every student. Since they’ve started back in 2014 I haven’t seen not one parent out of the loop as far as where their child stands plus it kinda serves as an additional support system since we all kinda look out for the other children too.

                • CPS is Chi-town? What charter? Noble Street? KIPP?

                  • HouseOfBonnets

                    Providence Englewood charter,they’re connected to Providence St. Mel.

                    • Hm. I’ll need to look them up. I’ll be in Chi-town probably for a college persistence PD at the end of the month.

                • Mochasister

                  I WISH we could make parent involvement a requirement in our school district.

                  • HouseOfBonnets

                    It should be one tbh, the majority of the parents at our school work all kinds of hours but they get that participation in every parent teacher conference, open house, recital and orientation is packed.

                    • Mochasister

                      I have a former coworker whose children attend a private Catholic school. She was telling me about the mandatory number of hours that the parents have to do each month. I can’t remember the number now, but I remember being shocked at it. These parents work, pay tuition, and still have to donate personal hours in their child’s school. Meanwhile we had difficulty getting parents to conferences.

                    • Maxine Shaw

                      T’is true. I took a 40% pay cut to get out of the public schools, and it was the best thing I ever did. The worst part is that it’s not the students at all. Give me difficult students (which I had) and I will fight and bleed for them. It was the administration that made me say fuhgedaboutit.

                    • HouseOfBonnets

                      And that is why educators forever have my support and sympathies.

                    • HouseOfBonnets

                      And tbh that shouldn’t be the case especially when the school gives some flexibility. Even some can’t make it they make arrangements to meet with the teacher. I can understand a difficult commute/work schedule/outside issues but when I see even those parents making a conscious effort to make sure their children are getting the best support possible it becomes a case of what can you do differently. Educating and raising children takes teamwork from all sides.

                  • Look up your state laws. Schools have a lot of power to legally impell parents to work with teachers.

                    • disk

                      I think with all that said, both teacher and parent is responsible. Your child isn’t in school for the first couple years of their lives…if you fail to teach them basic respect then it’s on the parents. The teachers however, should care enough to help them learn respect or remember their manners…how to behave etc. I remember going to school and having very irritating peers, meaning they were disruptive etc. N I remember thinking if it was me, my mother would beat me ass….my mother made it her duty and become acquainted with everyone of my teachers exchange phone number etc. I never misbehaved because I had a lot of respect for my mother. With that, that helped my teachers deal with me better, they made sure I did my home-work (I hated home-work) and that I understood it etc. If that kind of respect isn’t there from the parents and if the parents don’t take in the initiative to be involved with their child, then one part of the circle is already broken and now EVERYTHING is on the teacher which sucks. Teachers expect kids to already have basic home training, basic manners and basic respect.

                      Now, with that lady, I’ve had teachers come in with stuff like this and we all did great. To me this is kind of like telling lil girls to cover their bra strap it will distract the boys. I honestly was more distracted by my teacher writing on the board (I for some reason had a huge fascination with chalk and chalkboards, still do!) than anything on her and I had very odd shaped teachers

                • CozyVon

                  This is how it is at my daughter’s independent school…we parents actually have to sign a contract agreeing to put in at least 15 hrs of involvement/volunteering at the school w/ activities, etc. And I’m here for all of it…IMO, involvement in your child’s education should be a default thing.

              • I hear your criticism of TFA. I’m a TFA alum- Mississippi Delta, 2008. I also was a history major and got a social studies placement, so I knew my content knowledge. I’ve also had to coach sociology majors who was inexplicably placed in chemistry classrooms.

                People accepted into the corps have to pass the Praxis test- both the general one and a specific content one within their first year. From my understanding, failing that test gets you removed from the classroom at a traditional public school. Charters have more leeway, but ethical ones work hard to make sure teachers can pass that exam.

                • Ice Jones

                  it definitely was crappy. the worst part is that the charter system i worked in was the ONLY black-run charter network in the city and the worst reputation. only consequence given was out of school suspension, which to a bunch of kids who didn’t want to even be there in the first place, just felt like vacation. struggled to get parents in to conferences. once we sat for nearly 30 minutes with absolutely no one walking through the door. faculty was pretty much on their own. we had a teacher whose car got stolen and stripped. spotted on security camera and still allowed to return to school the next day where he attempted to apologize to the 1st year teacher in hopes that she wouldn’t press charges. she promptly turned in her resignation. this was within the first month of school last year.

                  • Jesus, that sounds like a poorly managed nightmare!

                    • Ice Jones

                      understatement of the year!

                  • Mochasister

                    And people wonder why people are not entering the field of teaching.

                    • HouseOfBonnets

                      and I thought it was just me noticing the shortage, lack of people entering the field.

                    • Mochasister

                      Oh no, not at all. Too be truthfully honest I can see why there is a shortage. Often times we have to deal with children that have some very serious issues: poverty,
                      homelessness, dysfunctional families, ELLs, severe emotional/behavioral issues, etc. On top of that we can have little to no support from our administrators. Some of these administrators are terrified of being sued by parents and many will not stand up to them. They will often placate the parents at our expense. When a child has some serious behavioral issues in your classroom, it can be very challenging. We write referrals but that doesn’t help in a lot of cases. Our principal even blamed one of my coworkers for the child’s bad behavior. Not to mention that we don’t get paid much. When you take these factors into consideration, is it any wonder people are opting not to enter the field of teaching?

                    • HouseOfBonnets

                      It’s not surprising at all honesty which is sad. The way things are going people won’t realize the issue until it’s too late. Educators have my utmost respect because high school showed me that education was not my calling.

                    • Mochasister

                      How funny. My original career goals was to become a high school Spanish teacher. Then I did my practicum in a high school Spanish class. I changed my mind with a quickness.

              • Mochasister

                Yes! A thousand times yes! I am a bilingual teacher with a master’s, a BCLAD, a bilingual stipend, and almost twenty years on the job. I do NOT make 800 a year. No where close to it. In fact, a lot of my paycheck goes back into my classroom.

              • Blueberry01

                I went through an alternative certification program, but I was required by the state (NY) to get my masters within five years.

                So, I did.

                Also, charter schools in NYC start off high (well because the cost of living is one of the highest in the US), but they demand more of your time – BEFORE you leave the classroom to grade, plan, call parents, do data inquiry, etc.

            • Nik White

              If lil BB’s folks didn’t make him/her practice/study/memorize times tables, long division is a distant dream.

              • Junegirl627

                Exactly lil BB folks are supplementing the lessons learned in school taught by the teacher.

                If you help your child with his lessons that is great. That’s being supportive.
                If your teacher is assigning homework and the subject is something that wasn’t taught in the classroom earlier that day, thus expecting you to teach a lesson they were supposed to teach, that’s a problem.
                If your teacher/school teaches western and white american history. I don’t like it but it is necessary to learn based on government standards and testing modules. So it becomes the parents job to fill in the blanks regarding their cultures contributions to american history. And our perspectives on american history based on our background.

                Its like an assist. The teacher shoots their shot and sometime it goes in with a swish and sometimes you need to get up there with the assist.

          • I disagree and respect your opinion.

            • Brooklyn_Bruin

              I appreciate your candor.

            • brothaskeeper

              MM, I see.what you’re saying, that it’s incumbent upon the teacher to present a coherent pedagogical lesson interspersed with emotional and social development pointers. Even so, if a doctor tells me I’m diabetic, I don’t blame the doctor for not having educated me on how to avoid/prevent its onset. Parents gotta parent.

              • I’m not disagreeing with you.

                Teachers also need to be held accountable for closing knowledge gaps. We don’t live in a perfectly linear society where everyone walks into the class at grade level.

                • Blueberry01

                  This is true, but that doesn’t address her point that parents are the primary teacher.

                  Statistically, a child directly and indirectly learns more from their parents since they’re around them longer than anyone else before they step foot into a structured school setting.

                  • I agree with you to an extent. The word gap between students with educated and non-educated parents, for example, is a staggering three million.

                    Still, skillful teachers can and must close those gaps. The challenge is coaching those teachers to such excellence.

                    • Blueberry01

                      Okay, I can agree with you on this. But, having proficient teachers want the initial argument.

                  • A child learns from someone they consider a significant other. Sometimes it’s the parent. An effective teacher works on becoming one as possible and works for legitimacy with the student’s parents.

                    My source is John Saphier’s “The Skillful Teacher” which is basically my professional bible.

                    • Blueberry01

                      …and we’re saying the same thing. My source is my brain. Lol.

            • Blueberry01

              MM, do you have kids yet? I’m curious if you feel that a teacher (of any grade level) would instill the same amount and quality of values within an 60-minute period for 180 days, among 15 – 30 other students, that you could do for the other eight hours of the day (I subtracted the time that they’d sleep) that you’d had them all year.

              • No kids yet. Are you trying to say since I don’t have children that I lack perspective on parenting and the impact it has on schooling?

                • Blueberry01

                  No. But I was trying to make parallel to your own life if you did. I’m trying to say that you’re missing the point that kids spend more time with their parents/home than they do at school.

                  And as a fellow educator, you and I both know this.

                  • Depends on the school. My school day is 7:45 to 4PM, with kids frequently opting to stay after till 4:45. So we have more face time with our kids than our parents, especially if the parents work overnight shifts at the chemical plant or Walmart.

                    • Blueberry01

                      In-school Weekly Facetime – 9 hours x 180 days of school = 1620 hours/school year

                      Out-of-School Weekly Non-facetime (Non-Sleeping) : 24 – 9 = 15 – 8 (sleeping) = 7 hours x 180 = 1260 hours/school year

                      Out-of-School Weekend (8 days/month or 80 days/school year) Non-Facetime = 24 – 8 (sleeping) = 16 x 80 = 1280 hours/school year

                      Out-of-School Summer Non-Facetime (10 weeks or 70 days) = 24 – 8 (sleeping) = 16 x 70 = 1120 hours

                      Out-of- School (Weekly, Weekend, and Summer/Non-Sleeping) = 1260 + 1280 + 1120 = 3660 hours

                      VS.

                      In-School Weekly Facetime = 1620 hours

                      It’s more than twice the amount for those who have parents who work day jobs. For those students whose parents work at night, it’s 2400 vs 1620.

                      And I didn’t count the holidays embedded into the school year as days off…

          • Tiffany

            “The parent is the primary teacher…” Absolutely!

          • Gibbous

            I disagree. I could not help my niece (whom I raised) with advanced math, because I’m not good at it. Her HS math teacher who was supposedly an expert in teaching HS math to teenagers, went on a rant in class along the lines of “didn’t your parent’s teach you this stuff at home?”

            NO, I did not, cannot, teach her this stuff at home, because I barely got through it myself. Also, the time it would take me to not only learn said math, but then learn to teach it to her would keep me from my day job which puts a roof over her head!

            I can make sure she does her homework and shows up in school, is respectful, well dressed, well fed etc. I can help her with science, social studies, history, French, and almost any other homework she may have. What I cannot help her with is MATH and it’s ridiculous to ask me to TEACH IT TO HER when she has to go to a school with a math teacher in it anyway!

            I also told her if he ever said anything like that again, she was to tell him she was an orphan!

            • cakes_and_pies

              If you don’t know it, you direct your child to other resources that can devote more time to helping her learn like an after school tutoring and now real-time tutoring online. That’s what my Mother did when she knew she couldn’t help me. She taught me how to access tools to help me to learn.

              • Gibbous

                Yes, we did that and she eventually got through the class. HOWEVER, we were at a nice school in a middle class neighborhood and forutnately, I could afford the time and money for what we needed. What about folks who can’t afford either? Are their children supposed to suffer because there is an expectation that parents will teach things that the teacher can’t or won’t? Shouldn’t I have been made aware of those expectation and provided with a syllabus for what I’m responsible for?

                Additionally, I was trying to learn this parenting thing all of the sudden with a 9 year old, and it was all we could do to hold steady. There are no instructions on how to help your kid in school. There is no way to tell if things are as they are supposed to be or if something is off. I often told my niece that I was doing the best I could, but honeslty, “I’m just winging this honey, doing the best I can without instructions or anything.”

            • I would of went right to the teacher and explain it’s his job to teach content, not mine. And if I was managing him, he would have to improve both his instruction and his rapport with his students. That sounds like a profoundly unsafe classroom!

              Also, this makes me think of a lot of the emerging research that homework has no impact on academic learning or habits. Quality instruction has a much higher value add on achievement. So the magic has to happen at school.

              • Epsilonicus

                Exactly. I taught Latin. I knew I was getting no help from parents on that. Halfway through the year I quit giving homework. It wasn’t helpful.

                • I assigned research papers every two weeks. Some of our parents can barely read and use tech. I got tons of crappy and plagiarized papers.

                  Instead, I flipped it. 50% to 80% of the papers were researched and typed in class. Tons of on the spot feedback and instruction on trends I noticed in the classroom. Average paper grade was a B, 62% increase on ACT English scores. And my students learned to get excited about papers.

                  • Mochasister

                    Excellent idea.

                    • I’m VERY good at what I did. I miss the classroom.

                  • Blueberry01

                    I was just about to say to wheel in that mobile laptop cart…

                    • We use Chromebooks. Excellent for instruction, $hitty for everything else. Unintended consequences- we have a crop of graduates who only know Google Docs and not Microsoft Office, which hurts them in the job market.

                    • Blueberry01

                      Same difference. Chromebooks are cheaper than the Dells we had.

                      One suggestion could be to incorporate more assignments that require Google Sheets, Slides, Forms, and Drive.

                    • We’re actually moving toward less Google Drive assignments and more toward Microsoft Office assignments so that I can get them jobs when they graduate. It’s hard, though, since Office is pricey and Drive’s programs are free. Students make the correct short term cost benefit analysis and choose Drive, and then are screwed in college because they can’t make a PowerPoint.

                    • Blueberry01

                      But Google Slides IS essentially Powerpoint. It uses the same shortcuts and provides the same features. (Google couldn’t call it, “Powerpoint” due to copyright laws.) Just like on a Mac, it’s called Pages; but, on a PC, it’s called Microsoft Word.

                    • Thereby are subtle differences between the programs that leave our students flabbergasted.

                    • Blueberry01

                      I honestly haven’t found any differences and I’ve used PPT my entire teaching career. If anything, G’Slides is better because you can search the Internet directly from it, access, edit, and collaborate in real time, embed multimedia files easier, plus run and control the slideshow from your phone.

                      Typically, people who struggle with G’Slides never knew how to use PPT.

                  • Nik White

                    Awesome idea and implementation!

                  • Epsilonicus

                    Kids thanked me for teaching them simple research skills. It helped in all their other courses.

                  • Lily

                    Honestly impressed. I know all teachers can’t bear the burden but you’re doing what you feel is right and that is everything. I applaud you and pray God gives you extraordinary strength to keep going!

            • Mochasister

              He had no right to say that in class. I realize that some parents may not be able to help their kids with all of the homework we teachers give our students. So many times kids will come back the next day and say, “My mom/dad didn’t know how to do this.” Yea, Common Core. Some of our parents don’t speak English and can’t help their child with the language arts based homework. I’ve had some parents ask me to show them a particular concept because they weren’t sure of how to do it. I don’t mind parents/guardians who genuinely want to help their children, but don’t know how.

              • Gibbous

                My biggest pet peeve were teachers who assumed that all students came from homogeneous families, i.e. Mom & Dad. There are SO many different types of families in schools these days, that every time a note or letter or teacher said “mom AND dad” not even mom or dad or family member or parents, Moms, Dads, anything, that it told me they weren’t really paying attention.

                With this teacher in particular, I had to discuss with my niece that her late mother would not have been able to help her any more than I could.

                • Mochasister

                  Yeah, you can’t assume anything nowadays. Usually I address my correspondence with parents/guardians. That usually covers everyone.

          • kingpinenut

            Amen

          • SouthwestDekalb

            This is something I can sink my teeth in pretty good. As an educator we’re responsible for a teaching, disciplining, and directing a child at school. But parents are ultimately responsible for their child’s education, supervision, and making sure that child has a safe community of people to pull from. We don’t go home with the babies and can only brighten the corner where we are with those who wanna glean from expertise and experience. I keep in touch with plenty of my former students, some good some bad, and 99% of them want to be shown the right way…..especially if they’re not getting it at home.

            I’m in my 13th year of education and I’ve been at all types of schools from my hood to yours and kids are generally the sum total of their surroundings. Kids whose parent(s) are college educated normally ends up at someone’s school. Plenty of times if the parents didn’t gonto svhool, the kids don’t see it as something that’s important. I’ve also had many instances where every “stereotype” is proven absolutely wrong. To sum up, genes are real so be careful who you have babies with!

            • Mochasister

              “To sum up, genes are real so be careful who you have babies with!”
              No truer words were said.

          • CozyVon
        • Question

          Really? You think its your responsibility to instill habits? I admire that call but I think you’re assuming a role that isn’t yours. Instilling habits is my job as a parent, that you test, refine and reinforce through exercises and assignments. But that’s my job to make it habit, not yours.

          And I say this because what leverage do you have over whether children adopt the habits you’re trying to instill? Really, none, aside from grades (which may or may not matter to a given student). As a parent, I have the full range of reward and disciplinary tactics at my disposal.

          • Where you use the word “leverage,” I use “leadership,” because that’s what great teaching is about. I generally do not use incentives to get kids to do work, and to get parents to buy into the habits I want them to get into. I instead focus on the leadership and managerial skills needs to get a parent to buy into the educational vision I have for your child.

            You are entirely right that it’s your job to teach habits. But sometimes I come across an ineffective habit. “Effort=results” is a frequent failure-mode habit I encountered, where a student would stay up all night on an essay and then get mad when I gave them a C because they didn’t follow directions. The parent wants an A, and I go through the process of building a vision that effort does not equal results. I go through great pains to make sure none of this is transactional, and when successful, all three of us are on the same page in regards to the new habit that needs to be taught.

            • Ice Jones

              curious to what grade you are teaching and where? cuz here in nola, most of the schools are charters and most of the teachers are using teaching as pit stops to grad/law school.

              • Junegirl627

                but you had bobby jindal who was a for profit education shell in charge of education.

                • Ice Jones

                  oh i don’t doubt that he had a hand in the shitshow we have going on right now. but it is what it is and the charters have a foothold on the system and aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, which is why i left education in the first place.

              • KIPP charter school in rural Arkansas, high school. My 9th year and working on my Master’s in Educational Leadership.

        • Junegirl627

          I have a huge issue with this as far as how african americans view education. We are taught that in all things we have to do it for ourselves and that is just not true! I mean think about it. We have this mindset that we gotta teach our children, which is one of the reasons why our kids disrespect educators because of the impression that they are high paid government provided babysitters instead of the highly educated masters and doctorate award educators they truly are.

          Yes I do believe that if I drop off lil D’quavious at school after helping with his homework the night before feeding him a nutrious dinner. waking him up making sure his bookbag is packed and he has all his textbooks, notebooks, calculator, pens and pencils and the latest book from the school book list for the last 13 years he better be smart when I pick him back up.

          My job is to teach right from wrong, proper hygene, global citizenship, self respect, and respecting others, It is not to teach long division, canterbury tales, and the theory of relativity. I don’t get paid to teach a teacher does so instead of thinking I should be the primary educator, I am fully prepared to be the secondary educator. I will take my child to the african american burial grounds in NY. I will make sure my child read Le Estranger by Camus and Ellison’s Invisible man. They will know that they are the great great great grandchild of slaves because it is my responsibility to supplement the education they get in school.

          • Your last paragraph hits it. The average reading level of a parent is around the 8th grade level. Especially after middle school, teachers become the keepers of knowledge and parents are increasingly unable to provide the academic support and habits their children need to succeed- especially given that each content area (English, history, science, and math) all demand different academic habits that parents may not know about.

            • Question

              Agree or disagree, interesting discussion.

              As a parent to a young child, in many ways I feel like these are the conversations that we all need to be having. Particularly in our communities, we need to provide the basis for discussions about expectations (grr…circular….participation in said discussions assumes that said parents care/have the time/blah blah blah)…

              • We’d do these discussions later at night when parents either were off work or were just getting off their Wal-Mart shifts.

                We also never do them on days where EBT came through because we knew parents were rushing to the store to stock up on food.

          • BrownBearBear

            You got lucky. I only got the Canterbury Tales from AP English Senior Year of high school. I had to memorize and recite the prologue in Middle English. For a grade. Mrs. Powers. Best teacher ever. 17 years later. I still remember it. Calms me down when I get the feeling I may need to shank a person.

            • RaeRae

              I recite “Friend, Romans, Countrymen…lend me your ears. I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him…”

              • BrownBearBear

                My jam starts off a bit like this:
                Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote,
                The droghte of March hath perced to the roote,
                And bathed every veyne in swich licóur
                Of which vertú engendred is the flour;
                Whan Zephirus eek with his swete breeth
                Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
                The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
                Hath in the Ram his halfe cours y-ronne,

                I speak a couple of languages, but Middle English isn’t for the weak. Even if you know English.

                • orchid921

                  Nice job!

                  • BrownBearBear

                    I had to copy/paste that cause accents and I’m lazy. But I give you straight Irish/Middle English FO The Plymouth with that one. Always love the look in their face when they can’t pronounce a word. And I’m like ” I got this fam’

                • Yahmo Bethere

                  The Anglo-Scandinavian roots scream. If you want to hear a derivative, there is an Icelandic procedural on Netflix: The Lava Field.

              • “Cry havoc, and let slip the dogs of war!”

              • Epsilonicus

                I had to translate Caesar from Latin to English in 8th grade. His war stories were interesting

            • orchid921

              I had to do that in 7th grade. I’m still shuddering just thinking about it!

            • Epsilonicus

              I never read them. I did learn first 6 stanzas “The Raven” in 5th grade. I can still do the first two stanzas by memory. I also remember a Lady Macbeth speech from 7th grade.

              • BrownBearBear

                We had to memorize one every quarter and recite it in front of the class. My favorite is also The Negro Speaks of Rivers by Langston Hughes. Still can’t recite it without dropping some tears.

            • I HATED Canterbury Tales.

              I was all about the Iliad and the Odyssey.

              • BrownBearBear

                I still have a few folk from those days who suffer from PTSD from Chaucer. I’m a weirdo. I got off on it.

            • Junegirl627

              Reciting canterbury tales has to calm down has got to be the creepiest sounding thing in life, lol! I love it! By the way I was sick of the nun’s priest I wanted to shank myself.

            • Lily

              Same here! I enjoyed the Canterbury Tales. For me, I enjoy recalling Hamlet’s soliloquy and Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnet #43.

      • Maestro G

        HA! “I’m a drop D’quavious off for 13 years. He better be smart when I pick him back up.” #ItsAWrap

      • Damon Young

        “I’m a drop D’quavious off for 13 years. He better be smart when I pick him back up.”

        #ilaughed

        • brothaskeeper

          I was gonna laugh until I realized I have a D’quavious in one of my classes who’s an 18-year-old sophomore.

          • RaeRae

            Years ago my husband was at Fondren Middle School and one of his students had a tardy note because he had to drive his mother to the doctor. Yes, the child was old enough to drive. In middle school.

            • Yay Radley

              I mean, it’s Fondren. Nothing good has happened on Fondren since like ’88.

              • RaeRae

                Pretty much…

            • brothaskeeper

              Taking smoke breaks during recess.

            • SON!

            • Mochasister

              At that point homeboy needed to just get his GED an call it a day.

            • Jas

              I remember being in the 8th grade and we had 2 16 years olds in the class. One of them was a boy and when he had to go to the bathroom he would just get up and go. No permission, no hall pass. At that age why ask for permission and the teacher was fine with it.

          • Mochasister

            When I was a freshman in high school, there was an eighteen year old freshman with us. She had the nerve to have a freshman boyfriend as well.

            • brothaskeeper

              Were they the same age?

              • Mochasister

                No! That’s why it was a scandal! He was fourteen-fifteen the same as us! Chile, the dragging that us girls did on her…..

            • That’s inappropriate and I’m sure illegal

              • Mochasister

                Ehh, we were a bunch of Black kids so they didn’t care. And he was a boy. For some reason people don’t take it as seriously when an older girl dates a younger boy. Maybe if it had been the other way around, something might have been done. I doubt it.

          • *clutches pearls* Yikes!

      • Mochasister

        Sadly, I know many parents with that attitude.

      • Nik White

        D’quavious is not going to be smart because D’quavious. He was held back in Kindergarden because he would not respond when his name was called as he’s referred to Quay-Quay at home and didn’t know his full name. When he finally got to 1st grade, he could not spell it correctly or fit it on the green paper. This lead to frustration and he just quit trying.

        • Brooklyn_Bruin

          Who’s fault? Teacher or parent?

          Who’s ultimate responsibility?

          Teacher, parent, society, or D’quavious?

          We know what has happened, what is happening, and what is going to happen to Lil D.

      • Alexis Robinson

        I read this out loud to my 3 month old son because he wouldn’t go to sleep. Some parents are trying! Lol #VSB.edu

        • Brooklyn_Bruin

          Blessed is the parent who turns everything into a lesson!

    • Cleojonz

      Thank you!

    • *looking high and low for the lie*

    • CozyVon

      Stop making sense!

      • HouseOfBonnets

        I can’t it’s a habit lol

    • FumbduckNlGGER

      Ho hum. It’s a ni66er, nobody cares.

      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/gnvpw9owx/anim_01.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s21.postimg.io/ejxmswpbb/anim_02.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/h4um77sq9/anim_03.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/ky60tp9ox/anim_04.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s14.postimg.io/isky8ldrl/anim_05.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/n3dy3svjl/anim_06.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/fnxnczsb5/anim_07.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/b2onbm7dr/anim_08.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/6xvc4sej3/anim_10.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/4b3s181yp/anim_09.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s15.postimg.io/xcsubywjv/anim_11.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/4c2fbzr27/anim_12.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s10.postimg.io/5yxlqzid5/anim_13.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s3.postimg.io/3xyme621f/anim_14.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s21.postimg.io/4owfg6nuf/anim_15.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s21.postimg.io/reaxoo2zb/anim_16.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/4v253lu6n/anim_17.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/y5h43szv3/anim_18.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s16.postimg.io/prbo2pi85/anim_19.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s14.postimg.io/m3nifcykx/anim_20.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/a83w7ovov/anim_21.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s21.postimg.io/w64u53qiv/anim_22.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s16.postimg.io/fmplicso5/anim_23.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s16.postimg.io/rvnplo1lh/anim_24.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s4.postimg.io/vjht4930d/anim_25.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s21.postimg.io/ku1obayyv/anim_26.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s16.postimg.io/jokseb239/anim_27.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s3.postimg.io/9vzfz0ypv/anim_28.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s3.postimg.io/7akmwlseb/anim_29.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s14.postimg.io/u9h1nkuf5/anim_30.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s21.postimg.io/j38eh4nxj/anim_31.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s21.postimg.io/nzgrlf7av/anim_32.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/dmr4l6i27/anim_33.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/ibqmztqtt/anim_34.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/lpmm5q23j/anim_35.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/db7go4rip/anim_36.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/jc6taz5fj/anim_37.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s16.postimg.io/um7fg1sg5/anim_38.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s11.postimg.io/41ug9kt1f/anim_39.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s21.postimg.io/5ikr4d0kn/anim_40.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s11.postimg.io/hqvea1bpf/anim_41.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s15.postimg.io/cs4ecptmj/anim_42.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s13.postimg.io/4ha9mv2yv/anim_43.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s16.postimg.io/7oq18ewwl/anim_44.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s12.postimg.io/oopq6is31/anim_45.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s11.postimg.io/7uubae5xf/anim_46.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s3.postimg.io/u2bw9rec3/anim_47.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s16.postimg.io/x8kvhx7r9/anim_48.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s15.postimg.io/tqkrxwxob/anim_49.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s12.postimg.io/vrxs8klv1/anim_50.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s22.postimg.io/vqcjkseap/anim_51.gif[/IMG]
      [IMG]https://s9.postimg.io/yh19oxtsf/anim_52.gif[/IMG

  • Julian Green

    Why can’t people just let this woman be great?
    Also, I feel like I know her from somewhere…that ASU gear is sparking my memory.

  • Other_guy13

    I don’t see the issue…let her be great…and fine.

  • Kim

    “Maybe she can dress more conservatively if she desires to, but there’s absolutely nothing she can do to ‘hide’ herself.”

    & maybe not take instagram Selfies in that classroom midget mirror but that’s all.

  • laddibugg

    Doesn’t every school have that one teacher (male or female) who is hot (or thinks they are) and wears clothes like this?

  • Val

    In France recently the government was telling Muslimahs that they were covering up their bodies too much at the beach and ordered them to stop wearing burkinis. (Burkinis are swimsuits that cover most of the body).

    So, as usual, this teacher bae stuff is just another case of folks trying to police women’s bodies. Nothing more and nothing less.

    • Charlotte

      I saw that. And I didn’t get it. Who cares if you wear a bikini or burquini?

      • BrownKitty289

        Perverted old men…

      • Val

        Islamophobia, misogyny and patriarchy together as one.

  • …What’s with he classroom “selfies” though?

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      Glad you pointed it out

      • Other_guy13

        y’all harsh

    • Other_guy13

      I mean…I know many teachers who take classroom selfies…nothing different than me taking on at my desk.

      • PDL – Cape Girl Shero

        Plenty folks don’t take selfies at work. I have yet to see that happening.

        • mochazina

          i counter that plenty of folk do, but frame, filter, and crop the telltale signs out. ;-) lol

          • PDL – Cape Girl Shero

            Yes, I can agree with that. But at my job folks ain’t talking selfies.

            • mochazina

              cubelandia over here… selfies galore.

              • PDL – Cape Girl Shero

                Lol……Clean walls/offices over here.

                • mochazina

                  sounds like ya’ll have harsh lighting. no wonder no selfies! LOL

                  • PDL – Cape Girl Shero

                    LOL. Actually it’s beautiful here. EVERYTHING is on point. This isn’t a selfie environment. AT ALL!

      • laddibugg

        My desk has great lighting. If my makeup is on point I’ll take one.

      • Mochasister

        This must be generational thing. I don’t take pictures of myself or my classroom.

    • #shebroughtitonherself

      • Val

        I hope you’re being sarcastic. You are, right? Lol

        • Dougie

          I read that with sarcasm, for sure.

        • **blank stare**

          runs away..

    • Julian Green

      That’s just what people do nowadays, for whatever reason.

    • miss t-lee

      I mean…I thought that was a bit much, but…hey.

      • Other_guy13

        How?

        • miss t-lee

          You think selfies in your place of business is a good look?

          • Other_guy13

            I have done them…sooo…sure. I mean…my pic on here is from work so…yea

            • miss t-lee

              Okay.
              So clearly, you’re not going to see the issue.

              • Other_guy13

                Not really…I work in a very relaxed environment.

          • I think it depends on the job. I take pics at work all the time, but I don’t work with children. Right now, my office is playing “The Quiet Storm” by Lil Kim and Mobb Deep on the loudspeaker. 20 minutes ago it was the uncensored version of Get Money. We’re ratchet more than most over here probably, but the point is that some professional environments aren’t as buttoned up, so certain things might fly where they wouldn’t elsewhere.

            • I hear you on that.

              I don’t see any children in her selfies though, so I don’t think she’s violated any ethical boundaries in posting selfies. I never posted pics of my former students unless I had permission from the child and their parents.

              • I don’t think she’s done anything wrong either, ethically or otherwise. I just wonder why so many in the classroom. Of course she could be doing this on her lunch break or while lesson planning or whatever, but it just strikes me as odd that her classroom would be her backdrop.

                • mochazina

                  i’d venture that she’s proud to be a teacher…

                  • IThen maybe pics of the students’ work, the classroom walls, the pretty colors…

                    I looked at her IG page and it’s pretty obvious SHE is the focal point of the pics, not her work. The girl is proud of her body and should be.

                    • Posting student work without permission will get her fired, quickly. Educational confidentially laws.

                      And for her being the focus- she is proud of her body. Introverts also have a tendency to frame only one or two people in their photos.

                    • Right, her body is the focus. Not her pride in being a teacher.

                    • There is some evidence she’s proud of her body- she took pics at home, I believe, in workout gear.

                      But I don’t see that focus in the pics she took at school.

                    • mochazina

                      again, i can contrast her to ChellyO – posing. every pic she’s tooted her hips out, propped that one foot up to accent her curves, etc. (compared to the ramrod straight posture with hands clasped low and forearms camo’ing her hips from flotus.)

                    • BmoreLikeLA

                      …I need to go practice these poses tonight lol

                    • Yes, you have to practice, those angles are hard. lol

                    • mochazina

                      OK, rephrase – she’s proud that she’s both fine and a teacher? LOL

                    • That I can get behind lol.

                      Seems like she’s like “I’m not your average frumpy dumpy teacher – watch me work!” and I support it! But she gotta know folks gonna take issue. They take issue with everthing lol

                    • Godsgoodgrace

                      That’s my thing, I’m proud of her as a beautiful black intelligent woman…but she better know she’s putting it out there.

                    • mochazina

                      true – but it’s also HER ig, so that’s not uncommon. and then secondarily proud of her profession…? idk, i’m trying to help her. LOL

                    • I get that – I see that. My point is that those same pics could have been taken against the wall outside work and she’d likely have no issue. Placing herself in the school decidedly makes this about what she does and not who she is. I want her to win too!

                      But some things are untenable lol

                    • miss t-lee

                      ” My point is that those same pics could have been taken against the wall outside work and she’d likely have no issue. Placing herself in the school decidedly makes this about what she does and not who she is. ”

                      Agreed.

                • Sigma_Since 93

                  some salty bird saying she should be working on lesson plans or grading papers vs taking selfies.

                • That’s what I was wondering. Is she posting OFOTD pics, or what?

                • cakes_and_pies

                  These aren’t selfies. My first thought was who is taking these pics.

              • Beauty In Truth

                Look at the lady haters today! Yes and the truth comes out! Lol. She looks great. BW need not be ashamed of their natural curves dmit!

                • LadyJay?

                  Great bod, for sure!

            • miss t-lee

              My environment isn’t buttoned up at all. However, if I do take selfies at work, it’s definitely cropped out, and you’ll not be able to easily identify where I am.
              As you said, all environments are different, and she opened herself up for scrutiny taking pics in the classroom. It just doesn’t scream professional.

            • charisma_supreme

              Ayyyye! *90s bop* You wanna sip Mo on my living room flo’….

            • Charlotte

              Where do you work? And are y’all hiring?

          • Cleojonz

            Hey sometimes you do what you gotta do, the lighting is good lol. I will leave out any identifying objects in the background though.

            • miss t-lee

              Because you’re smart.

          • Dougie

            My uncle who is a kindergarten and 1st grade teacher in North Carolina takes selfies in his classroom all the time. He just won teacher of the year in his district.

            • miss t-lee

              Potato, potahto.
              Apparently this lady did as well, but is your uncle getting backlash?

              • Dougie

                nah not one piece of backlash. I don’t think this woman should either. Selfies before or after school aren’t bad things at all as far as I’m concerned.

                • miss t-lee

                  Ehhh.
                  Your uncle is probably an older gentlemen too, so…this field is not exactly even.

                  • Dougie

                    He’s older than her, so yes, the field is not even. My only point was that selfies are fine in my book as long as the kids aren’t in the classroom.

                    • miss t-lee

                      Let’s agree to disagree.

                    • Dougie

                      Let’s disagree to agree!

                    • miss t-lee

                      LMAO

            • Mochasister

              Congratulations! You must be very proud of him. Our job is not anice easy one. He must be very dedicated to his students.

    • Negro Libre

      “Hey you fourth grade kid staring at me, do me a favor and take this pic so I can put it up on my instagram!”

      • You know, my sisters and I had a discussion about this earlier today.. And I made a comment that a student probably took the picture. LOL!

        • Negro Libre

          And you know it was probably one of these little boys who gives her an apple everyday before class who did it too…

      • BmoreLikeLA

        The way her classroom is so clean though, I assumed these were “before the school year started” pictures. Esp the one in the hat. you know how teachers get excited when their classrooms are finally finished. The ones with heels, idk…I’ll give her the benny and say orientation lol

        • mochazina

          every teacher i know posts pics of *the classroom* when it’s about them being excited about the classroom being finished. LOL

          • BonnieLovesNola

            Heck yeah! Putting up a classroom in like 2.5 days is exhausting. I put up my pictures with pride. Lol.

        • Strong teachers keep their classrooms spotless because children deserve to work in a space that communities how loved and valued they are. I’m assuming the best and guessing she’s good at her job and teaches her kids to leave it better than they found it.

          • BmoreLikeLA

            That’s a good point. Doing my practicum is what made me realize I didn’t want to teach, and I have no kids, so I don’t know how class is supposed to look. anything classroom that caters to under 11, I just assume is a mess. But that’s because I have no interest in kids or classrooms lol.

            • What’s a practicum? Is that your teacher training program?

              • Maxine Shaw

                Yup. And what most people don’t know is that you have to pay for it (through tuition or alt cert), and most of us went through UNPAID internships. Between missing four months’ of work PLUS 15 hours of graduate school tuition, I paid about $8000-$9000 for the privilege of being teacher. (Emphasis on the word PRIVILEGE.)

                • What school is this program through?

                  • Maxine Shaw

                    Since she’s already graduated college (supposedly), she could get teacher certification at many universities. I earned my certification hours by taking the alternative certification program at my university, then used 12 of those hours as my electives towards a Master of Science, then used 12 of THOSE electives en route to a Master of Education. (This is not required; as long as you do 15-21 hours in Curriculum and three in educational Technology, you can receive the certification and stop there.)

                    Many school districts would shower her with money as an experienced para w/a bachelor’s degree. The only catch is that she might not be able to do it at the undergrad level b/c she already has a degree; she would have to go to graduate school just to become a certified teacher. (And who the heck wants THAT?)

                    Other programs are alt cert programs that cost as much (if not more) that aren’t tied to a university. I think they should all be burned, but that’s just me.

    • Val

      So, she should have known better? Pretty teachers shouldn’t do what thousands of other teachers do?

      • I take selfies all the time, but I don;s necessary;y post them on IG. I don’t have any problems with her being pretty teacher. There are pretty teachers, lawyers, doctors etc… That’s not what my question was.

        • Val

          Like I said, teachers post selfies all the time. So are you against teachers posting selfies in general? Or just the pretty ones?

          • Other_guy13

            Gf posted pictures on her IG when she taught…i don’t see the issue either?

          • Joi

            Thank you, I. have agreed with all your comments. You can’t blame someone for the body type they were born with. *shrug*

    • Lego

      My local district had a big social media campaign for the first day of school. And many of my teacher friends use their social media networks to foster stronger school communities.

      • RaeRae

        Yeah…same with the school I’m at

    • Brandon Allen

      Attention.

    • PinkRose

      I never took selfies when I taught recently, but that’s just me.

    • Ice Jones

      didn’t realize something was wrong w/ taking pics at work. i’d say her only problem is not making her page private but that’s it.

    • Mochasister

      Probably because spend so much time there! It’s like our home away from home.

  • If she loses her gig over too much attention, she can always start a fitness class with FLOTUS…

    • Other_guy13

      I mean…she in atl…would it be wrong if *signal lost*

      • Blueberry01

        April 2017, OG….

    • I’ve not seen anything she’s wearing that would even result in a write up.

More Like This