What Becky Gotta Do To Get Murked? White Womanhood In Jordan Peele’s Get Out » VSB

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What Becky Gotta Do To Get Murked? White Womanhood In Jordan Peele’s Get Out

Universal Pictures

 

(This piece contains major spoilers. Beware.)

Jordan Peele’s transcendent Get Out is the latest entry in black folks’ long-standing fascination with horror; beginning with our folklore (Zora Neale Hurston’s Every Tongue Got to Confess), early literature (Charles Chesnutt’s The Conjure Woman and Other Conjure Tales) and film (Oscar Micheaux’s A Son of Satan) as well as contemporary literature (LA Banks’ The Vampire Huntress Legend Series), and short films (Bree Newsome’s Wake; Tananarive Due and Steven Barnes’ Danger Word). 

But it was when Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) removed his fingers from around the neck of Rose that I knew I had to write this piece. In a scene reminiscent of the fatal climax of Shakespeare’s Othello, we are held rapt as he is poised to finally punish the instigator of his personal hell, Rose (Allison Williams), for her intimate betrayal, yet he is unable to put an end to his white temptress. Why not? The woman has lied to him for four (or five) months, literally led him to slaughter as she introduces him to her eugenically-inclined family, orchestrated her mother’s hypnotic assault upon his psyche (possibly after psychologically grooming him for months), paraded him around his potential buyers, and ultimately chased him down the lane with a rifle shooting to kill. If we continue to see Chris as an avatar for black manhood, the film’s finale serves as one more indictment of black men’s sustained inability to punish white women for their willful complicity in white supremacy. And so I ask on behalf of (a whole lot of black women and femmes), what line does Becky have to cross to get murked?

**************

It was actually three black men that failed to kill her…Paul Bunyan should have shot her twice and his boy should have run over her with the TSA squad car. – Tracey Salisbury

This reluctance on Chris’ part is particularly notable in the horror genre in which it is commonplace, expected even for white women to be killed in increasingly graphic ways. As pop culture scholar Janell Hobson says of this moment, “It’s almost as if brothers are still scared they’ll get lynched if they demonstrate any violence towards Becky—even cinematically.” Why does the film depict a black man so unwilling to pull this trigger? Why does this film still find it problematic for its own protagonist to enact thorough, graphic revenge, and even righteous revenge on white womanhood for its steady betrayal? I mean the chick chased his black ass with a rifle down the driveway.

Yes, yes, he kills the mother, Missy Armitage (Catherine Keener); but we can only presume how she died (letter opener through the eye) because the camera quickly cuts away before it happens. Now compare this to the (partial) death of Jeremy Armitage (Caleb Landry Jones) who is brutally beaten about the head with a croquet ball. Or even Dean Armitage’s (Bradley Whitford) graphic piercing through the throat by the horns of a mounted stag—shout out to scholar John Jennings for highlighting that he kills him with a literal buck! The camera lingers on details like blood spurting through the father’s mouth or slowly pooling around the brother’s head. Not to mention how the frame stays with the Georgina (Betty Gabriel) as we view her head crashed against the car window in a repose of death. Peele’s editorial choices reveals his hand: graphic white male death is okay, and even the fetishizing of the dead body of the one (of two total) black women characters is just fine. But the intentional framing and editing choices Peele makes to conceal and work around the explicit deaths of Missy and Rose show that white women are still valued as fragile and occupy a unique cultural privilege…even in the blackest horror film of this decade.

Kinitra Brooks

Kinitra D. Brooks is an Associate Professor of African American and Afro-Caribbean literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She recently edited an anthology of short horror fiction written by black women, Sycorax’s Daughters and her upcoming monograph, Searching for Sycorax: Black Women Haunting Contemporary Horror will be published in 2017. She has published articles in African American Review, Obsidian, and FEMSPEC. In Fall 2016, discussion about Brooks’ innovative course, “Black Women, Beyoncé & Popular Culture” focusing on Beyoncé’s Lemonade went viral, drawing local, national, and international press coverage to her model of creative and rigorous cultural criticism.

  • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

    “…black men’s sustained inability to punish white women for their willful complicity in White Supremacy.”

    Wha? Why is it incumbent upon us to do any of that? Some people don’t deserve our forgiveness or our punishment; just our indifference.

      • pls

        looool

      • NotyoKneeGrow

        side note: don’t Trump have you reconsidering how dumb W actually was? I mean I wouldn’t copy no test answers off of W….but he has been interviewing well lately AND Trump seems like he is the worst kind of dumb….

        • uppin some jigs

          man black folks are still sleeping on 43 even though Trump makes him look like Malcolm X.

    • pls

      Because those becky’s are talking mad chit about black women and a lot of black men are just “indifferent” to it.

      • those beckys can’t be neutralised/eliminated with black girl magic?

        or am i going too far?

        • pls

          They absolutely can be, but when black boy joy is spotted not doing chit it only gasses them up

        • La Bandita

          No they can’t. There is a limit to our super powers. Like Super girl we need Super man. Like Robin we need Batman.

          • super girl needs a yellow sun. not a super man.

            ive heard the rhetoric for the past generation. i’ve seen enough of the tea leaves.

            May YOUR will be done, on Earth, always.

            • La Bandita

              I was joking about that – but generations and you have no solutions uh.

              Step aside og and lets us solve. Im getting close.

              • The floor, and the planet, is yours.

                • La Bandita

                  Gracias, mi amor. I will treat the floor and planet w/respect.

                  The conversation that was important to you generations ago is still important to many today.

      • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

        So what? I’ve not heard many Black women claim that they need us to protect them from White women.

        • pls

          bye niqqa

          • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

            Don’t do that.

            • B, why did you run away when I did?

            • Wise Old Owl

              Welcome to VSB…when a VSB does not agree with the tired trope that all negus ain’t $hit and love white women and hate Black women…he is attacked and mocked….

              • La Bandita

                Chexism going to chex…

        • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

          Stop the madness.

          • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

            Yeah, in retrospect, that comment’s pretty ignorant.

            But fukit. This thing has got me heated.

            • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

              *rolls eyes*!!! Please.

              • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

                No, real talk, I am seriously offended by statements made in this article and the way several of the VSS are framing this issue.

            • “M”

              This

              “Yeah, in retrospect, that comment’s pretty ignorant.

              But fukit. This thing has got me heated.”

              will get you no bonus points in the “My XY Gender is THE LOGICAL Gender” sweepstakes.

              AMOF – no points at all this round, Julian.

              • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

                ……Logical?

                When did I ever make that claim? I’m not going to pretend that I’m not being emotional about this- I’m genuinely annoyed.

                • “M”

                  You can be both logical and annoyed at the same time.

                  But if you expect anybody to give your actual arguments any credence at all, they’re going to have to make some sense.

                  You can’t try to gaslight peeps and then expect them to take you seriously. That’s some Trump-style shenanigans, and I thought for the most part VSSs and VSBs were above that kind of thing (after we all got past that old Zerlina Maxwell piece, anyway).

                  • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

                    Then instead of being condescending, why didn’t you just ask me what I was talking about? That would have been a lot easier.

                    • “M”

                      Yeah, it looks as if somebody’s being deliberately argumentative and – frankly? I need neither the derail nor the aggravation – especially since I’ve already seen how you’ve behaved with other VSSs on the thread.

                      Benefit of doubt (which you all always demand that we give) heretofore withdrawn.

                      Bye.

                    • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

                      Yeah, yeah. I got it.

                      Take your ball and go home.

      • Question

        “A lot of Black men”… Is this really rampant, or is it just the ones who seem to speak the loudest seem to get attention? I’m not denying that there are Black men who take up for white women and who will do so to the detriment to of Black women…

        What I am asking is why we continue to give them our attention. Said Black dudes get the same indifference…

        I ask because this conversation never seems to lead anywhere. Not surprisingly, this “thread” is going to be filled with a bunch of women commenting, with few word from men. In reality, its not incumbent upon us as women to fight that fight – its for the VSBs to hold each other accountable. And in the meantime, I will give the brothers who act accordingly my attention – the rest? Fuck ’em and their white women…

        • Epsilonicus

          I dont think it is that rampant. I just think people are sensitive to it and thus notices it when it happens.

          • Val

            Heightened awareness.

            • Epsilonicus

              I don’t mean sensitive in a bad sense. You just become hypervigilant about it.

              • Val

                I upvoted you. I just added that there is a term for this, when you are hyper aware of something making it seem like it happens or exists more than it does. So I agree.

          • Alessandro De Medici

            Social media shrinks the world and gives people a false sense of what consensus is on anything. For most of us, we only have so much time to care and be reactive to everything.

        • pls

          Disagree. With the high school aged kids I teach being the next to take over, we cannot afford to just ignore all the people that uphold white supremacy. It’s only getting worse. They must be excommunicated like any person betraying their culture would in any other group. Latinxs don’t eff with other Latinxs that don’t speak spanish or who abandon their culture…

          • Question

            “Excommunication” doesn’t require deep explanations and shouting down – just excommunicate them already. The constant need to try and convince them of the err in their ways is fruitless and pointless. Just let em go already…

        • CheGueverraWitBlingOn

          Thank you.

      • *Upvotes and moonwalks the heck up outa here*

        • Question

          Wait…where you goin? How come y’all (general, not you specifically) aren’t holding each other accountable? Isn’t that point? This type of commentary needs to be coming from y’all (again general, not you specifically)…

          • cogito has left the building.

            • Freebird

              Hold the door my dude.

            • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

              You just practicing indiffereticity, huh.

              • I had to practice reading indiffereticity. No lie.

                • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

                  Continue practicing reading it while being in that state.

            • La Bandita

              haha – you’re so wrong.

      • La Bandita

        Regurgitating White Supremacy words to their women and child then making it a bm/bw issue when its really about 2 things love & loyalty.

      • Define indifference. Just because a Black man isn’t up in arms doesn’t mean he’s blindly with the ish.

        • pls

          black men should be up in arms every time we are disrespected the same way black women have been up in arms about black men’s right to exist for the past 5 years.

          • Layla Melodie

            Yeah, you’re asking for reciprocity that is NOT going to happen. Thankfully, some black women are finally realizing that it is much better to put our interests first. Can’t say if you should do the same–it’s your life.

      • No Google

        Not just indifferent most of the time, they cosign the chit.

    • Why is it incumbent upon us to do any of that?

      i’m not going to give you the typical answer “well black women always support you!!” because i didn’t have that typical experience.

      that being said, if -we- as a community are actually going to come together, then we have to protect each other. that means those with the ability and the power, probably should protect and support those, that need protection and support.

      no matter that they claim that they don’t need you.
      no matter that they claim how problematic you are.

      if you do what you do out of good intentions, then it’s all gucci.

      • Question

        if -we- as a community are actually going to come together, then we have to protect each other

        There in lies the challenge. Who is “we”? (not rhetorical).

      • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

        When did this become all about Black women though? This whole article revolves around a man’s individual act of choosing to punish/not punish/forgive/not forgive white women for a transgression that was made against him as a Black man.

        Yeah, Black women have a place in the discussion, but what grounds do they have to admonish a man if he chooses, of his own volition and for the sake of his own sanity, to just disengage?

        That’s what’s getting on my nerves about this whole thing.

          • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

            I’ve picked my hill where I’m going to die.

        • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

          just like brotherskeepers talked about art being subjective, that’s what her interpretation was. Ain’t nothing you can do about it. That’s how she feels and she is allowed to feel.

          • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

            She can feel however the fuck she wants; how any individual person interprets that final scene for themselves isn’t my issue with this.

            My problem is that- in my opinion- some of the VSS seem like they’re saying Chris’ decision to not kill what’s-her-name is an act of cowardice somehow typical of Black men and that he “owed” it to Black women to take revenge.

            Maybe I’m completely off base, and I’m misunderstanding but that’s how it’s seeming right now.

            • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

              Eh.

            • La Bandita

              You’re off base. It saying theoretically can bm shake the beckery. The limousine liberals used her to lor in bm to kill. Can he break the power of the becky – he had his change. I didn’t want him to hurt her. Is he still subjected to the becky power.

              Peele was married to a wyte woman 20yr older than him. I think he was Hayworth or the guy w/Chris Jenner.

              • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

                So, then, what? Is killing her the only way to “break the power of the Becky”?

                • La Bandita

                  No, I didn’t want him to kill her or become a killer. But Rose could’ve given him a gold chain in the beginning as a present and then in the end he could’ve torn the gold chain off his neck breaking the beckery spell.

                  He would no longer be a conduit to spread White Supremacy that door would be closed. And now if he fell in love w/a wyte woman it would be love.

                • Blueberry01

                  Symbolically, yeah.

                  • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

                    I have a fundamental problem with that interpretation; to me, it’s like saying that the only way Black men can emancipate ourselves is through acts of violence. Sure, violence is often a legitimate way to take back your agency, but it’s not the only trick in our repertoire.

                    • Blueberry01

                      But that’s why I said symbolically and not actually. Him displaying violence against Becky would prove that a Black men can truly escape the allure and psychological hold of a white woman.

                      I agree that there are many ways to regain your agency, and honestly I think that her mode of death was poetic enough (I felt like he left her to die in a way that was both gruesome yet dignified).

                      But, our history has shown than Black males don’t enact violence towards WW when it comes to regaining their agency (for various reasons) – or at least it’s not portrayed that way in film.

            • “M”

              You are … reading waaaaay into some things, homeslice.

              I’m thinking that if you ran that entire piece — no, I’m all in; the comments too (excepting of course yours and mine here, OC) — through a word search, “coward” and/or “cowardice” is NOT going to come up when you hit control+F.

              AMOF, I personally thought the author was talking about a phenomenon much more akin to the “endless forgiveness” expected of POC so wypipo could go on doing reckless shyte yet again, such as is detailed here:

              https://medium.com/@SonofBaldwin/our-house-is-on-fire-3e16b0f764ff#.4mcnqs36i

              There *is* an issue of BW/WOC and erasure in Get Out – AMOF I dipped a toe in about it upthread, but have yet to write my own thinkpiece, as it were, ’cause that’s a load I don’t really have time for this week/month/possibly year – but what you are talking about? Is something else altogether that is not even in there (and sounds an awful lot like projection & assuming a load of guilt that nobody asked you to, imo).

              • I see where you’re getting at, but Black women and White men doesn’t have the same visceral punch as the other way around. I’m not sure you can include both tropes in the same movie and somehow make sense.

                • “M”

                  “but Black women and White men doesn’t have the same visceral punch as the other way around”

                  Gonna need to see that citation there, Mr. T. :-)

                  It also depends on *who it is* that’s receiving the visceral-ness of said punch. I assure you – just based on the time the white lady spilled the wine down my white suit when I was out with the white dude she’d wanted (and the dude I was with made her pay the cleaning bill) – that Missy Ann apparently received one whopper of a visceral punch that weekend.

                  At the same time, I personally received a visceral punch not only because the one WOC in the film was both literally and figuratively sidelined not only in the film but also in all the subsequent “thinkpieces” I’ve read so far … and it’s been my experience that men of color either (much like white men) don’t notice because it’s then no longer All About Them, OR they duck the subject altogether ’cause they don’t want to talk about it.

                  “I’m not sure you can include both tropes in the same movie and somehow make sense.”

                  Which is precisely why I said *both*

                  a) “nobody and no piece of art can be 100% for everyone all the time”, and
                  b) “I will wait for the next movie and/or thinkpiece to see”.

                  :-)

                  • There’s a major difference between real life and a movie. Few would put your situation in a movie because it would be perceived as punching down from the White woman’s perspective. Heck, a lot of times when it’s a White guy with a Black woman in a movie, it’s used as a way to make the White guy look good, not to give the Black woman any sort of agency. Even within the context of Get Out, it implies that the Black woman got there through a lesbian relationship, allowing just enough menace to keep the story going. (And Lesbians Being Killers is its own horror movie trope.)

                    A Black woman being the driving partner in a story where a White guy and a Black woman are together would be another hill to climb, and I doubt that Jordan Peele could (or should) be the one to climb it.

              • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

                Of course I’m reading into this; this article isn’t about how the flats are the best parts of chicken wings. It’s a piece that’s made to be read into.

                And come on, we’re all adults here; don’t act as if someone has to have specifically said the word “coward” in order to denote Black men’s failure to challenge white females. Implications are still the same.

                • “M”

                  “f course I’m reading into this; this article isn’t about how the flats are the best parts of chicken wings. It’s a piece that’s made to be read into.”

                  I should have said “misinterpreted”, then.

                  Except that you had already been so hypersensitive & overreactive with the VSSs who already tried to call you on your misrepresentations in comments that I was trying to mince my words.

                  No longer. And not trying to get with the derail, either.

                  Just because you might have read that word in someone else’s thinkpiece — and at this point I’m half-tempted to ask for a link — you don’t necessary get to over-apply it in this one. Especially if it’s — I’ll say it again — not there.

                  • JulianWithTheRedCorvette

                    I’m sorry, but where do you get off telling me that I’m being hypersensitive and overreactive?

                    Going by some of your comments, I’m assuming you’re a woman. This article was not written by an outsider making a commentary on your gender; it’s making one on mine.

    • That last sentence pretty much sums up my thoughts.

  • Junegirl627

    Sidebar: I’m getting a little tired of the “Moonlight made the biggest upset of all times” articles. Its starting to feel like some people are making it seem like the Best Picture win was a token or a bone thrown at black people you like “see Oscars isn’t racist”

    http://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2017/03/little-gold-men-best-picture-win?mbid=nl_CH_58b9ab05a50ee02e65e42d04&CNDID=37426882&spMailingID=10549473&spUserID=MTMzMTgzMDMzOTQ0S0&spJobID=1120263819&spReportId=MTEyMDI2MzgxOQS2

    • pls

      They always do that. Even when you win or are right they try to create doubt.

    • Question

      Moonlight didn’t upset anything. It won. End of story.

    • Michelle is my First Lady

      I’m upset the whole mix up thingy completely overshadowed the actual win.

      • Darkchloe144

        I kind of think, in some way, it was “supposed” to. (Be used as an opportunity for overshadowing, not staged I mean).

        • Jennifer

          Even without the mixup, the articles would have been about how all the pundits got it wrong about La La Land–the best thing since sliced bread.

          • Mary Burrell

            White mediocrity always trying to trump black excellence.

            • truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

              That’s true.

      • I’m with you.
        Enough of this boolshiddery.

      • Blueberry01

        Yup.

        I read somewhere that we should be feeling sorry for (or apologizing to) the cast of LLL for letting them think they won. ?

    • Jennifer

      Had an FB friend say it was a “pity win.” I wanted to tell her to pity deez, but I instead told her we would have to agree to disagree. Some people act like they gave the Oscar to Soul Plane.

      • You should have taken her out and given her a handy on the beach under the moonlight. Then she’d truly understand. Then the next day whup her azz.

        • Jennifer

          Well, that’s another option.

          • “M”

            LOLOLOL.

        • *slow clap* Well played, cogito. WELL PLAYED!

      • NotyoKneeGrow

        well if it was a pity win…so are all of those subpar white movies…..i’m lookin at you “Driving Miss Daisy”

        • La Bandita

          never Understood that movie…

      • Emperor_Jagi

        I’m black and I’m sorry to say it kinda was a pity win. Just look at how the whole award happened it was all weird with people messing names up. Some blacks complained last year so they give a trophy to shut people up. I just wished it wasn’t Moonlight

        • Jennifer

          This response frustrates me because I saw La La Land and still thought Moonlight deserved to win the award. There were Hollywood insiders who were campaigning for this movie the way they campaign for every other lily white offering. So, Hollywood finally gets it right, it’s still out of pity?

          • Emperor_Jagi

            lol I understand why you feel like that. But if there’s wasn’t that whole oscar so white thing the year before I wouldn’t even be saying that. Now I never saw moonlight so idk whether it deserved it or not but just look how it went down. People messing up names, people acting confused the whole process was all weird. Let’s not mention a gay black movie? I’m sorry I don’t see this as a win for black people. Blacks wanted an oscar so bad now they have one but at the white man’s own term. A movie portraying gay black men. Sorry this one is a lost to us and I blame us for it. Since we rather seek validation from others instead of creating our own.

            • Jennifer

              Yeah. A story about a gay black man is still a story about our community–particularly when the movie’s action takes place in Liberty City, Miami. It was a slice of life story that was completely Black.

              For the record, we created our own validation. It was the NAACP Awards. Hidden Figures won that one…and I still thought Moonlight should have prevailed.

              • Emperor_Jagi

                Lol so if we have our own awards then what was all that complaining about the oscar so white last year for? I guess you not seeing it from my point of view. I’m not saying whether moonlight deserved it or not. I’m not saying a black movie should win or not. It’s just how it won and the fact that it happened the way it did right after the complaints from last year. its like saying “ohh you want the oscars so bad now here’s one about black gays” So I guess only black gay movie can win now. I guess I’m thinking about the image that it portrays about black men in general relative to other races. We can agree to disagree but don’t say that it won’t have an effect on black youth. We didn’t win this one I’m sorry we got played.

                • Jennifer

                  *sigh* You know that’s not what I’m saying at all.

                  And, you’re not seeing it from my point of view. You’re stuck on the content of the movie. It was a beautiful movie. When I saw it back in the Fall, I knew it deserved to win…even as I watched the other nominees. I understand why it won the Oscar. I understand why it didn’t win the Image award. It’s the same reason Taraji beat Viola Davis for Entertainer of the Year — in a category that also included Beyonce. The criteria of the Image awards is different. And, I say this as a person who loves both of those actresses…and Beyonce!

                  • Emperor_Jagi

                    Ok I did initially wrote a previous and longer paragraph then I realized that it will just bring us back to square one. However here’s what I’ll say. I see what you mean and I’m sure the movie is great and deserved the oscar. But do you think it would’ve still won if we didn’t do all that oscar so white last year? Let’s say instead there was a slave movie that came out instead of moonlight. There’s probably a high chance that it would’ve also won the oscar. Why because it seems only movie that portray black men as slaves or less then men that seem to get recognition. That’s my point because of that whole oscar complaint we’ve literally put ourselves at their mercy to nominate and choose whatever movie they deem fit to represent us. Last year The Revenant won but the black men equivalent is moonlight? So what’s wrong with Fences? Or any of the movie with strong heterosexual black men lead? Yes we won but at their own term. That’s why I was against that whole oscar so white thing because I knew they would hit us back with something and they did. Please tell me you at least see where I’m coming from. I’m sorry but I’d rather any other black movie won then moonlight. I’m huge fan of cottonmouth btw and I’m happy for him. Sorry for long rant

    • Blueberry01

      I haven’t seen LLL so I’m biased, but the friends that I know who did said it wasn’t all that – or at least enough to garner all these accolades.

      • Junegirl627

        Its nostalgic and they don’t make sing and dance musicals anymore. we haven’t seen a good one since Chicago “the movie” so its always gonna get likes

        • Blueberry01

          That’s it?!? People are raving about it because they’re too lazy to watch Chicago on NetFlix?

          Is the acting/singing/dancing any good?

  • Can’t win for losing I guess. That’s not good I at all interpreted the final moments of the film.

  • Nicholas Peters

    It could be that it is still frowned upon to show men physically assaulting women in movies and culture in general. I call it the Jane Wick test. If John Wick (2014) was exactly the same but with a woman as protagonist I 100% sure there would have been hundred’s of think pieces saying it was a good movie but seeing men shoot, punch and throw them off of a balcony women is unacceptable in movies, even action movies.

    • Physical abuse of women in film. Nah.

    • $$west

      Didn’t John Wick beat the brakes off a woman assassin in the first movie?

      • Nicholas Peters

        Even that was qualified. He was injured at the start of the fight, didn’t kill her and of all the fight scenes it was (by far) the tamest.

  • That’s why I like Jason Voohees. He see anything bigger than an C cup and it’s on.

  • Diego Duarte

    There’s only so much this white supremacist society is willing to let slide, I mean even the liberals are out in arms calling this the “most racist film” they’ve ever seen. They certainly can’t handle a mirror held up to their face.

    Then again, if you’re already doing this might as well go the whole nine yards right? Can’t please everybody, nor should it be his duty to appease white feelings.

  • TheVilleintheA

    I thought she was on her way out anyway due to being shot in the gut with a shotgun/high powered rifle by the ex-boyfriend turned grandpa. Why waste your energy? Now if the Heifer didn’t get shot with a shotgun then I would have this question rolling around in my head. Dude was probably tired.

    • Darkchloe144

      Physically and emotionally drained.

  • Darkchloe144

    A lot of interesting interpretations in the comments so far. I just don’t know where I stand yet. I initially thought the safe thing, that his affection for her was what gave him pause. He just couldn’t bring himself to do it.

    Now that I think about it, what if he had killed her? Would I have felt better for him then? And that last little police car red herring wouldn’t have been as satisfying, that’s for sure.

    So even if this does say something about Peele and other black writers/directors, their willingness to kill off white women (at all or on par with other films, or characters within this film), I can sorta forgive him for that. This easily could’ve slipped under his radar, as far as potential interpretations are concerned.

    And while another black dude technically did kill her, it wasn’t the protagonist and that holds a lot of sway over the viewer, regardless on whether you agree with Ms. Brooks here or not. I certainly appreciate this perspective tho, great read.

    • YouNITeeWhy

      i think the protagonist not killing her was more powerful because she was killed at the hands of one of her victims- a actual victim of this horrible experiment. if anything Georgina and Walter deserved to have that satisfaction more than Chris as they had lived through that torture for years probably.

    • “M”
  • I don’t know. I prize a black man’s humanity over violent revenge fantasy ending. He had a clear change in demeanor in the closing moments. I’d rather him stay who he is as a person than some fleeting moment of victory. Not that he would of been morally wrong to kill her. That was clearly not part of his character though. Not even being into the whole her enjoying him choking her bit that you didn’t care to mention.

    • Are you going to see Logan?

      • At 3:45

        • *nods

        • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

          You have a date?

          • Nope. I rarely go to the movies with people.

            • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

              So I can’t come?

              • You are always invited wherever I go.

                • Hiding My ?hide yours 2

                  One of these days. ?

            • Lol@ See it alone first, then everybody else.

      • BatmansExWife

        I heard Logan was good. Last night, I saw John Wick 2 and Logan was packed!

        • How was Wick

          • NotyoKneeGrow

            don’t go to see John Wick 2 for a deep plot and you good…you gotta let some movies be about the action

            • True true.
              That’s why i peeped the first one

            • BatmansExWife

              Right! It was basically about guns and shooting.

          • BatmansExWife

            The dog didn’t die, which is good!

            More gore and shooting. It was good. Of course, don’t expect good acting.

        • Red October

          Saw Logan Thursday. It was amazing. Quite possibly the best superhero movie ever. Very mature and emotional for a movie of it’s genre. Also it was packed. Not an empty seat.

      • Alessandro De Medici

        I’m gonna check it out over the weekend.

        Just checked the credits, guess who’s in it:

        http://i1.wp.com/thegrio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/elise-neal.jpg?fit=828%2C466

        • Epsilonicus

          Lemme go find a babysitter so I can see her in it.

        • BrothasKeeper

          My one upvote is actually 100 upvotes. I’m gonna linger just a bit.

        • Val

          *tries to scroll past photo, scrolls right back to it*

          • It’s like your favorite song. Never gets old.

        • CrankUpThe_AC

          I’ve been looking at this for entirely too long lol. She is just ridiculous.

        • Johanne Sterling

          welp. Guess who is going for a jog and getting back onto Whole30? This bish. For the fleeting hope my body might body all of VSB like this woman one day.

          TOO MUCH BLACK EXCELLENCE IN ONE DAMN PHOTO. And by too much I mean not enough!

      • Val

        I’m always amazed at how many movies I never even hear about until someone here mentions them.

        • Nicholas Peters

          It’s really good…you should see it.

      • Gibbous

        Saw Logan. It was excellent. Can’t wait to see what is in the future for Dafne Keen who plays Laura, the little wolverine.

    • Val

      I agree in principle but what makes that potentially problematic is that the message for us has always been seek the moral high ground. We, Black folks, almost never get to exact revenge. In media that is.

      • I get that. I mean there was Django

        • Val

          That wasn’t our revenge, that was Tarantino kissing up to Black folks in an attempt to obfuscate how racist many of his film are.

          • La Bandita

            But Kerry Washington – love her.

      • YouNITeeWhy

        i think the protagonist not killing her was more powerful because she was killed at the hands of one of her victims- a actual victim of this horrible experiment. if anything Georgina and Walter deserved to have that satisfaction more than Chris as they had lived through that torture for years probably

      • Shay

        I don’t think it was a message to us to keep being morally superior but a depiction of how we (as a community) ARE always picking morality over revenge. Ppl should be baffled by the consistent restraint of black and brown folks.

        • uppin some jigs

          im not baffled at all. it makes perfect sense considering we have no idea who we are. that was the first thing beaten out of us.

          • Gibbous

            Who we are can be decided at any given moment, every given moment, and everyone decides for themselves.

      • I’m not sure that the end counts as moral high ground though. If anything, the end could be read as him washing his hands of morality.

        • Val

          Okay. I was speaking more in general about how Black characters in media are or aren’t allowed get back.

          • The thing is that the final act is Chris getting revenge, unless you call killing 4 different people non-confrontational.

            • Val

              I was just going off Malik’s comment. I haven’t seen it yet.

    • But, we already were waist deep in the violent revenge fantasy ending. As previously noted, we got to see the bloody deaths of everyone else, but the white women. Why is it the deaths of white women that’s the determining factor for a black man’s humanity? White women got the kid glove treatment.

      • Outside of the brother none of the deaths in the film particularly lingered from an action stand point.

        • You’re forgetting the dad. Not only did we linger on ‘Chris’ thrusting antlers into the father’s head, we then get a full Shakespearian death. lol Writhing. Falling. A fire starts. It definitely is graphic, and lingers.

          • I’m talking about Chris taking pleasure in murdering him. We watch him bleed out but Chris rams him and leaves immediately.

            • But, ‘Chris’ could’ve simply picked up the gun and shot her again, to make sure she was dead. He wouldn’t have had to linger, then.

    • CheGueverraWitBlingOn

      Thank you! *rolling my eyes at this whole line of argument*

  • Nicholas Peters

    Just thought about it…Maybe it was just a horror trope where the big bad can’t die…Peele already said he has more horror movies planned and after the box office Blumhouse will want a squeal.

    • “M”

      “after the box office Blumhouse will want a squeal”

      Freudian slip …?

      :-)

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