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VSB.com Special Report: The Return of the Black Man’s Hat…Again

*Administrative Note: If you’ll look to the right you’ll see that VSB.com has been nominated for three Black Web Awards! Best Blog, Best Relationship Advice Site, and Best Site for Brothas. Hooray. Go click and vote. If Obama can do it, so can we. Yes we can! Yes we can! Thank you all for helping us get to this point. I’m not really big on awards and all that to be honest, but it’s cool that anybody thought enough of us to nominate us…so thanks for helping to make VSB.com a hot spot on-line. And thank CP3 for just being hot.*

Last week, CNN aired a special entitled “Black In America”, a two-day documentary about the state of Black people in our adopted homeland of America.

And despite my lack of actual expectations in regards to what CNN would actually be able to accomplish, I still found myself to be disappointed. Essentially, CNN aired:

Black People For Dummies.

Dummies = white people.

(And um, not that I think white people are dummies. Naïve? Yes. Dummies? No.)

I found this documentary interesting for a few reasons, and none of them positive. For one, if you actually gained insightful information from this documentary…

…you need to read more. Point blank. Period.

Similarly, I don’t actually understand their point or whom they were actually trying to reach with it. For instance, any white person that actually watched it probably already knew the stuff they were talking about or at least had a clue. Hell, any white person that actually watched it was probably interested enough to care about Black people…so they’re probably empathetic-ish to the Black cause and therefore know that stuff.

With that stuff = being Black can blow ass at times.

For second, most white people probably didn’t watch it anyway. It was on CNN, and what with all the commercials I keep seeing about having to go digital in 2009, much of middle America probably didn’t catch CNN with their bunny-ear antennas. Or better yet…

…most white people probably just didn’t care. I could be wrong on that one.

In fact, I’d actually be happy to be wrong about that but really, I barely watched it and I did only because I didn’t want to be the one Black person who DIDN’T watch it. Basically, I just didn’t want to NOT be apart of the conversation.

And I’m Black.

For third, most Black people don’t have cable so they weren’t exactly watching it though. I do assume that similar to Tyler Perry movies, a lot of churches and stuff had “Black In America” viewing parties…and they did have T.D. Jakes up in there.

Anyway.

Ultimately, I just don’t understand what their point was – if there even was one. It wasn’t enlightening…if anything, they lightly touched on the successes of Black middle America. Even the successful people that were profiled (Asst. Superintendent in Arkansas, Michael Eric Dyson, etc.) weren’t immune from the regular f*cktasticness of the rest of the Black community.

Was it supposed to inspire? Or to shine a light on the failures of Black America? Was I supposed to feel pride in being Black? Probably not because it wasn’t really positive. But after watching it I didn’t even feel anything. Was it depressing? Not really. It wasn’t anything I didn’t already know. But then again, why just put more stuff out there that adds nothing to the conversation.

You can’t actually do justice to the question about being “Black in America” if nobody actually ASKS anybody…

… “what does it mean to you to be Black in America?”

When you just lightly touch on varying issues, desperations, and almost-successes of the Black community what are you actually trying to accomplish?

Maybe I read too much or maybe I expect too much where I shouldn’t expect anything. But for some reason, I expect people (CNN) who decide to undertake something so complex to approach the situation with a little more respect than to merely touch the surface with no real attempt at any depth. Granted, discussing what it means to be “Black in America” would require about 27 years and two weeks to give due diligence to the subject but still…

Perhaps you got the point and I’m just slow. But good people of VSB.com, did you watch Black in America, and if so, what did you get out of it?

By the way, I’ll be talking about this all week…today, I pulled a CNN…I just lightly touched on the topic. Tomorrow, I’m pulling a Panama Muhf*ckin’. I’m digging deep.

-VSB P aka THE ARSONIST

Damon Young

Panama Jackson is a co-founder of VSB and co-author of Your Degrees Won't Keep You Warm At Night: The Very Smart Brothas Guide to Dating, Mating, and Fighting Crime. He believes the children are our future and is waiting to find out if he is the 2nd most interesting man in the world.

  • http://www.myspace.com/chicanextdoor Miss Patterson

    i watched this too. and like you Panama, I was not impressed. i felt particularly foolish because i took so much time ‘promoting’ it to my e-friends on facebook only to discover that the overall theme was ‘black in america sucks hot dyck and black females will die alone and single’. i watched part 1 with a friend of mine who happens to be white, and while on one hand it validated some of the debates we’ve had in the past about the significance of race in America and the notion that many Black females feel like they have little or no options, IT ALSO made me feel terribly uncomfortable. at one point i just sort of zoned out and started reading the next day’s post on vsb (ahhhh the west coast time zone advantage…vsb at 9pm PST -sweeeeet!) Anyway, needless to say with all of the focus on Black females being alone and unable to find their ‘match’ I felt a weee bit depressed when the show was over. As I’ve stated on here before I don’t have a problem with dating interacially…but seriously are these statistics right? Are we (Black women) not matched up well with our Black men-ses?? This hurt me in a way I can’t even explain. On one hand, I blamed LA for this. I don’t remember feeling quite the drought and the disparaging gap as I did when I lived in Atlanta, NYC or Pgh…but these women were from all over and they were all singing the same song. Ain’t no brothas out there that I can relate to. So I ask you, am I in the wrong frickin’ town? And again, I leave you with this declaration: EAST COAST 2009!!!

    • http://lizburr.com Liz

      Girl, I am not even tryin in LA anymore. Seriously. I am trynna be on the ‘East Coast 2009 or Bust’ bandwagon with you!!

      • http://www.myspace.com/chicanextdoor Miss Patterson

        cool! can’t wait.

      • http://www.Blog-AroundHarlem.com AroundHarlem.com

        Don’t come to NYC. We don’t need any more single women here …… LOL ;-)

    • miss t-lee

      ‘black in america sucks hot dyck and black females will die alone and single’

      This was it in a nutshell. :) Love it mayne!

    • http://goodeness.blogspot.com GOODENess

      you know Patt-tastic…I am really entertaining an east coast exodus for me and the legacy before he starts “big boy” school…I have even been doing cost of living analysis between here and DMV…the men that I’ve dated in TX that I have actually liked have all bee imports from the east…to I am really thinkin on it…east coast 09 baby??? lol…

      • JBoogie

        As a native Texan…I concur. All the guys dated for any significant amount of time were from outside of TX…one from Michigan and one from New York.

      • http://www.myspace.com/datfya BigBuck

        NOOOOO! Stay where you are! Take it from one southern boy who has been stuck in the DMV for 2 years. Come to visit, but don’t stay! I’m getting the hell out of here!

        • http://goodeness.blogspot.com GOODENess

          yeah..I heard from somebody that there is a shortage of “good” women in the DMV…have heard it more than once…so supply/demand dictates that a move could be more beneficial for mate selection…or to be selected as it were…but I hear ya Buck…I am thinking on it…but definitely not moving anytime soon…

          • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

            I have to wonder who put that information into the atmosphere? DMV has all kinds of women…all over…that can read.

            Then again, what does “good” woman mean exactly anyway?

            • http://goodeness.blogspot.com GOODENess

              @ Pana-man-tastic…I really don’t think there is a definitive “good” woman…it’s completely subjective…just throwing something out there that I had heard one day…but we all say it about where we are, unless of course we have somebody…then we don’t…

    • http://www.myspace.com/yummit Treezy F. Baby

      LOL I’d say get outta LA with a quickness…it’s easier to deal with the man shortage elsewhere. There still seems to be one but at least mofos actually come up to you and ask you out. :/

    • JBoogie

      ‘black in america sucks hot dyck and black females will die alone and single’

      LOL…but I ain’t claiming it. I know lots of BF’s that are married to good brothas…despite the media cramming the “statistics” down our throats. Sh*t…if I don’t get married til I’m 50…still not dying alone and single.

    • http://trudylonette.blogspot.com Trudy L.

      “…and black females will die alone and single’.”

      try overweight, alone and single.

      • Kitsune

        “try overweight, alone and single.”

        No Trudy. That’s overweight, alone, and single with a few kids by different daddies and HIV.

        • miss t-lee

          That’s right! I missed a few…

  • http://lizburr.com Liz

    ….I was finna say. This is mad generic about the special because I had PLENTY to say about both episodes, and even segments within the episodes.

    *woosah*

    But I’ll let you go first.

    • http://www.myspace.com/chicanextdoor Miss Patterson

      i really liked the roundtable discussions they had after the show with Anderson on his 360 show. soledad got a little more in your face about the issues. i felt like that was real talk right there.

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

        i do agree there. the roundtable seemed more substantive than the actual “documentary” itself.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=73903598 Dom

    I didnt catch any of it, and to be honest I had no interest in watching it. I’m black and most of the people I know are black. If I want to know what its like I just think about my own life.

    Besides, I figured that it would be more of the same old “edu-mentary” bs: black people struggling, dealing with racism, and a host of statistics that dont really proove a damn thing cuz more of us are going to college but we’re also going to prison in droves. Or the stat that shows fewer black women are getting married but we keep having babie!

    Honestly, what the hell am I supposed to do with that type of info? Listening to the rants of the folks who watched the show, I get the feeling I didnt miss much…

    • http://lizburr.com Liz

      black people struggling, dealing with racism, and a host of statistics that dont really proove a damn thing cuz more of us are going to college but we’re also going to prison in droves. Or the stat that shows fewer black women are getting married but we keep having babie!

      You cheated and read the transcript of the show. I know it!

    • http://myspace.com/thomasforbes Monk

      Dom says, “Honestly, what the hell am I supposed to do with that type of info?”

      Bingo!! Being fed regurgitated info that you’re already familiar with really serves no purpose.

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      “Honestly, what the hell am I supposed to do with that type of info?”

      nothing. you’re not part of the target demographic

      • http://goodeness.blogspot.com GOODENess

        @CHAMP…then who the hell was the target demo? I am not a big TV-er and I don’t have cable…so I haven’t seen it, but I don’t want to…to me it was real Million Man March-ish…good intentions…discussion…followed by inactivity and complacency…thanks but no thanks…I had better ish to do…me and my son and our peeps went outside and played on the slip and slide…

        • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

          “@CHAMP…then who the hell was the target demo?”

          basically, if you’re the type of person who would?could be a regular at vsb, then you weren’t the target audience.

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

        i actually think their target demo was Black people and white people. the very people that watched it, reading ninjas like myself, are exactly who they wanted to watch it. the problem is, reading ninjas like myself do hope to gain something out of it.

        they didnt make it for white people. it ended up being for white people or anybody who doesn’t know much about the Black Experience (so-to-speak). they wanted Black people to watch it and feel that it did justice to the plight of Blackness in America. i’m almost sure that was a goal. and i’m sure they feel they did a good job with it.

        why else would they find random people to offer quotes like, “CNN’s Black in America was insightful and groundbreaking.”

        You know, the quotes they used right before the unnecessary poet started spitting his hot fiyah.

        • http://trudylonette.blogspot.com Trudy L.

          “…the unnecessary poet started spitting his hot fiyah.”

          talk about it!!!

        • http://www.Blog-AroundHarlem.com AroundHarlem.com

          LOL @ the unnecessary poet

          That guy annoyed me all night.

    • aja

      Im with you Dom..i really didnt care to see it..cuz 1. im black..i know how it is to be black duh!
      2. im a black female..and thats a struggle in itself.
      3. im a female who was the first black woman to ever work my job and it stayed like that for years.. and had to be the “voice” for black america everytime something involving someone black came up in the news..
      Being black in america is a very complex issue and who ever thought it would be a good idea to devote a 2 day show to it is..halfway crazy lol ..Hell they could have just shown the Eyes on the Prize Series again and called it a day..lol

      • http://kamakula.wordpress.com kamakula

        I wonder why people feel it’s a burden to be the “voice” of black people when you’re the only black person in some place. If you were the only American working in some company in China, and something went down involving the USA, you wouldn’t be making the same complaint.

        Inherent in this is the thought that if things were much better, “white” america would know that “black” people thought without having to ask. Or if there were a lot more black people available, then everyone else would absorb our feelings via osmosis.

        I don’t see anything wrong with someone trying to get my (unique to them) perspective on an issue. But then again, I seem to be the weird banana in the bunch.

  • http://myspace.com/thomasforbes Monk

    In fear that my comment may be perceived as negative, I’ll start with the highlight of the show – Soledad O’Brien is fine than a muafugga. That may sound a tad bit shallow, but it is what it is and she’s very easy on the eyes. I’m also a fan of her work by the way.

    As far as the other aspects of the show, I was highly disappointed to say the least. I’m not sure was it all the hype and publicity surrounding it or what, but it really left me hanging. I generally enjoy documentaries and expose’s but they usually are beyond merely being informative. Many will at least try to convey some type of emotions to encourage people to do something other than freakin’ talk. If that was CNN’s sole intention then cool, but honestly, that’s all the majority of black folks do ANYWAY – just TALK about our problems and issues. We always have forums on shyt but rarely put things into action to effectively make a difference in improving our situations. Of course I’m not implying that none of us do shyt (I subscribe to Dubois’ Talented Tenth ideology) because I know some of us do, but it’s very small minority. I didn’t see any pertinent solutions offered and I felt it was somewhat a waste of time.

    In conversing with a friend who enjoyed the show, she said that it wasn’t intended for US…it was intended for THEM (white folks). I felt it was somewhat geared towards other races, but was it really? I mean the series was advertised all over black radio, black weblogs and print publications, and all the people who sent me emails ‘reminding’ me to tune in we’re black, so how was it NOT meant for black people??

    Another thing that irked me was the spoken word artist (I think it was Saul Williams). That just threw me for a loop in the relevance of his purpose in the show. I don’t know, maybe someone somewhere was entertained by it, but it was distracting and annoying IMO.

    • http://www.myspace.com/chicanextdoor Miss Patterson

      thank you! first, on your observation about the lack of discussion on ‘solutions’ or at least ‘objectives towards finding a solution’ besides walking away saying ‘damnnnnn’…and secondly on the spoken work b.s. -how bloody cliche can you get? was that saul? did he cut off the locs, because i sure as hell didn’t recognize him.

      a lot of what i mean regarding solutions is looked down upon. esp with regards to the education issue…it’s like the age ol’ middle class solution to problems that are often dominated in the impoverished black communities. still i think the objectives are worth at least putting on the table.

    • FulaniGirl

      I agree Monk

      How many “State of the Black Unions”/ The Covenant propaganda/Black In America/Al Sharpton jive turkey talk will we engage in before we get up, turn off the TV and do something about what we see EVERYDAY anyway?

      Talk is great if the problems aren’t known. But we know the problems, we know who’s affecting, we have many theories as to why- where are the PLANS of ACTION?

      “Black In America” was just a glamorized version of what we catch everyday on the 6 o’clock news. And everbody gets that 365 days of the year. They’ve said it, you’ve said it, I’ve said, she’s said it, he’s said it, we’ve said it. Enough talk. go do it.

      ….I think the poet’s name is Jon Goode.

      • http://myspace.com/thomasforbes Monk

        Yeah, it was Jon Goode. Guess that shows how familiar I am with cats like that…lol.

    • miss t-lee

      In conversing with a friend who enjoyed the show, she said that it wasn’t intended for US…it was intended for THEM (white folks).

      I agree with your friend.

    • miss t-lee

      Another thing that irked me was the spoken word artist (I think it was Saul Williams).

      Not Saul Williams—but he was also was getting on my nerves as well.

    • http://www.sheliagoss.com/blog Shelia

      Even when written for “them=white people” a lot of them were left disappointed because the media already portrays Blacks in a negative light so the show didn’t show them anything they either didn’t already know or perceive about us.

      I saw the show and it was very disappointing. Unfortunately I don’t think it showed the full spectrum of “Being Black in America.” I know it was only a 2 day/2 hour show and it couldn’t cover all of the issues (good or bad). One angle I was hoping to see on the show was how it was to be Black and in a corporate environment.

      In my opinion, I think the media portrays Blacks in such a way that most people think we all live in poverty, we all come from one parent households, and other negative examples I can give, but won’t…but it’s not true. I would like to see a show where it shows more of the positive or at the very least – a balance.

      We’re no different than other races. We as Americans all want the same thing—a fair chance, we love our families and our country and we work hard to make it whether we’re pulling 6 figures or 4 figures.

      • JBoogie

        “We’re no different than other races. We as Americans all want the same thing—a fair chance, we love our families and our country and we work hard to make it whether we’re pulling 6 figures or 4 figures

        For me…that’s it in a nutshell.

    • http://goodeness.blogspot.com GOODENess

      ok..we are NOT going to act like that about a spitter spitting…but I am upset that threw a poet in for good measure…I mean they may as well have had kids eating watermelon too…again…I didn’t see either of the specials…but it sounds lke they “squoze” every Negor-stereotype they could think of into a casserole of hot mess that we already knew…reading this…I am SO glad I didn’t see it!

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

        yeah, my beef with the poet was two-fold…1) why b/c its blackness do we automatically get a cat rhyming as the leadin…but moreso than that…if we MUST have one (i really could go either way) why can’t we get somebody who’s actually hot at that shit…

        why not get the folks from New York’s Slam team or something…perhaps that fellow is actually really good and his time constraints prohibited him from being any type of real addition to the quality of the show…i just didnt think it added anything or was necessary, which just made it seem like they threw a poet in there because black people tend to rhyme…all the time…

        • http://www.Blog-AroundHarlem.com AroundHarlem.com

          Truth be told, I had to ask myself if he was “cooning” 2008 style.

          *I don’t think I’ve ever used that word before*

  • FulaniGirl

    the series should have been re-titled…”Is there any hope for Black folk in America?” smh.

    I watched this CNN special and the whole time I kept thinking. “I cannot identify.” I have never had a black male in my family that had a record. My parents have been married for 35 years. My grandparent married for over 60 years, my aunts the same way. Both parent are professionals (mom now a home maker). I went to college, my sister is in college. All are married to black productive people. My significant other does not have a record, he is educated, no children. We are waiting for marriage. Why can’t I identify?

    Why are we being boxed in and told this is what we are? Im single, mid-twenties, not married and here is the shocker…. I do not have 50-11 babies by 50-11 baby daddies. It is expected that I’m part of the 70% of us to not be married. But to CNN it’s because my black man does not possess the ability to commit to his family, cause Pookie n ‘em got Boomquisha and 6 other baby mommas he does not support nor even make an effort to see the kids. The reason Pookie is like that, its because this is all Pookie knows. His daddy did it, his grandpappy did it. So he cannot help himself.

    There so many commited black fathers and mothers. So many successful black families. So many positive black children accomplishing many wonderful things in our communities. Why are we always represented to the world in our press by the bottom of the stock. Did they really have to pick a family with a son who goes around shooting folks? All of the non-felons in the world and they had to show that.

    Yes, I cannot identify. But I have to be concerned because this is the standards that I’m held against by other races. I’m now judged by Pookie and Boomquisha’s situation.

    also, did anyone see Michael Eric Dyson about to get to the light skin-Dark skin (& opportunity) discussion before it was quickly changed/shut down??

    • http://lizburr.com Liz

      also, did anyone see Michael Eric Dyson about to get to the light skin-Dark skin (& opportunity) discussion before it was quickly changed/shut down??

      YES!!!! I was like WTF? In the LAST 90 seconds of this tired special they get to the good stuff and then it’s time to wrap it up?? *throws shoe at CNN*

    • http://www.myspace.com/chicanextdoor Miss Patterson

      “also, did anyone see Michael Eric Dyson about to get to the light skin-Dark skin (& opportunity) discussion before it was quickly changed/shut down??”

      uh yeh, i peeped that ish. also, they did have that one super successful family who all went to college and daddy and momma were present. that was cool. sadly however, i did relate to pookie & boomquisha (i’m so mad at you for the names- LOL!) i’ve got a few of those in my fam. :( but i hear you…it would have been nice to see a wider variety. i’ve give them this, they sure as hell didn’t gloss over that shyt. soledad put his a$$ on the spot a few times. i loved it when the pookie character said ‘yeh, but i’m gonna flip it’ (i’m paraphrasing). in reference to how he was gonna break the cycle. soledad just furrowed her eyebrows and let the camera fade to black. she’s great.

      • miss t-lee

        “also, did anyone see Michael Eric Dyson about to get to the light skin-Dark skin (& opportunity) discussion before it was quickly changed/shut down??”

        I caught that. It was shut down with the quickness. That’s why they gave him the last 10 minutes of the segment. You ain’t slick CNN.

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

        “also, they did have that one super successful family who all went to college and daddy and momma were present. that was cool.”

        the interesting thing about that part was that the successful folks they did show seemed to be highlighted as more the exception than the rule, which may be true, but when trying to highlight the black experience, i do think that you need to take a more expanded view to include more than one successful family (on the first day).

        the more i think about it, i just dont think CNN had the tools or knowhow to approach this type of endeavor…the problem is, they don’t know they dont know how to approach this type of endeavor.

        • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

          “the more i think about it, i just dont think CNN had the tools or knowhow to approach this type of endeavor…the problem is, they don’t know they dont know how to approach this type of endeavor.”

          i think hbo would have been much better, mainly because of the non commercial thing and the fact that they have the latitude to take it much deeper

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

      “I have never had a black male in my family that had a record.”

      Um. Wow. I’m slightly amazed by this. Hell, I need both hands and feet to count the number of men i KNOW of in my family with records.

      • JBoogie

        hayle…ONE friggin’ male in my family without a record…sad i tell ya…

    • KihsannAllah

      For the record, my nickname has been Pookie since college and i have no kids, no jail record and both my parents and grandparents are still married.
      i have to co-sign with many of the previous posts that the show sucked. Why, does the Media [Multi-Ethnic-Destruction-In-Amerikkka(tm-Professor Griff)] feel that the only Black experience in America worth talking about is the urban one? Ish ain’t sweet for us brothers and sisters who grew up in the suburbs either. Or what about my cousins down south who live out in the country? Not all Black people live in the city and those that do are amply represented in movies, rap songs, and the 6 o’clock news. Overall, i thought the whole thing was redundant, with no coherent theme to the entire exercise in shoddy journalism. 4 hours isn’t nearly enough time to cover even a portion and it didn’t help that they seemed to cut to commercial every 5 minutes. That poet guy got on my nerves too.

  • QCSports

    Those that are making the comments that this was all negative didn’t watch both shows. There was plenty of positive there from the superintendent and his sons and their success to what the the professor was doing with the young kids and even the doctor at the end. Even with that this really was nothing but a for your information piece for other cultures (hello white folks!) to understand black america. Although I’ll add some of the stories were interesting. I was really wanting to here more of the story of the DA having to deal with his own brother wrapped up in the system. Interesting irony. The story of the marketing exec was the most interesting to me because it relates to me a little. I wanted to hear more of that, which points to the biggest problem with the doc the fact that it was sooo broad. I wasn’t able to catch the panel discussions afterward or before.

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      “There was plenty of positive there from the superintendent and his sons and their success to what the the professor was doing with the young kids and even the doctor at the end. Even with that this really was nothing but a for your information piece for other cultures (hello white folks!) to understand black america”

      in a nutshell

    • http://myspace.com/thomasforbes Monk

      I don’t think all the content was negative, I just had a negative/bleek reaction to it all because it lacked in so many areas and didn’t live up to the hype.

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

      i think for me this speaks to a larger point, when attempting to discuss the true state of being Black in America…how do you approach it?

      do you focus on the fact that Black people are still struggling in leagues?? or do you attempt to highlight the positives that are out there? there has to be some sort of balance, and i don’t think there was much of it. there were some positives, but overwhelmingly, the positives were largely overshadowed by the negatives.

      and maybe thats my own hangup. but i don’t need all my pictures to be rosy. i don’t mind the truth…but if you’re going for the truth angle, don’t distort the truth in a way that feeds right back into the stereotypes that the truth is supposed to address.

      unless, of course, the stereotype is the truth. and are we ready to make that statement?

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

        “unless, of course, the stereotype is the truth. and are we ready to make that statement?”

        i dont think anybody (myself included) is truly ready to have that discussion

        • Nut

          “unless, of course, the stereotype is the truth. and are we ready to make that statement?”

          i dont think anybody (myself included) is truly ready to have that discussion

          Unless we want to continue to be where we are as a race do we really have a choice not to? We have to be honest with ourselves. I really think in these type of discussions are where you start to find fuctional solutions. These type of disscussions are so over due that we are at the point that anything else seems pointless like this show.

  • malael

    like fulaniGirl said it might have been better to name the series is there any hope for black america. seriously cnn wtf?!?!? everything was way to broad. it seems like they were trying to throw everything into four hours which we all know isnt possible. why not have it a week long series touching on more issues.
    and while i had alot of pet peeves on the special my biggest may have been about them having mcdonalds as a sponsor. i dont know how you can have a whole segment about health problems then have commercials about fast food and then have them “black themed” except they come off as mocking black america.

    • miss t-lee

      i dont know how you can have a whole segment about health problems then have commercials about fast food and then have them “black themed” except they come off as mocking black america.

      I caught that too.

    • http://myspace.com/thomasforbes Monk

      “i dont know how you can have a whole segment about health problems then have commercials about fast food and then have them “black themed” except they come off as mocking black america.”

      Great Observation!!

      It reminds me of one time I was watching the 6 o’clock news and they did a story exposing LA Weightloss as being fraudulent. They had hidden cameras and everything exposing the lies that they were telling people. When the commercial break came, it was a freakin’ LA WEIGHTLOSS commercial!! WTF?

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

      “it seems like they were trying to throw everything into four hours which we all know isnt possible. ”

      i agree with this. its like they tried to make “higher learning” or “she hate me”. and we all know both of those movies were doing too much and by default didn’t really do much at all.

      entertaining as they may have been in their f*ckery.

      though let me say i at least understand why higher learning tried to do EVERYTHING at once due to the college campus-ism.

  • Cheryl

    I wanted to watch, but the cosmos didn’t work it out for me. My kids and I had a prior engagement Wednesday evening and by the time we got in and settled it was over. I just knew we were going to watch the 2nd part but after getting home from dinner, the boyfriend said he already knew what it was like being black in America and didn’t want to watch it. I remembered too late that I have a DVR.

    I haven’t heard a whole lot of positive things about it, and I don’t know any white people that watched it. But then again, I don’t know a whole lot of white folks.

    I’m going to see if I can’t find the eps on the internet somewhere and view it. Thing is, us whities can watch an episode a day for everyday we are alive on what it is like to be black in America … and we will still never know what its like to be black in America.

    • http://myspace.com/thomasforbes Monk

      They’ve replayed it a couple of times, but if a great deal of people you associate with are Black, it may be a waste of time.

    • http://goodeness.blogspot.com GOODENess

      @Cheryl…listen to the BF girl…you associate with Blacks…you have a Black BF… you have Blacks kids…that show isn[‘t going ot shed any light…reveal an epiphany or any other such f*ck’ree…you can watch it if you want to, but that’s time you will never get back…you coud be outside playing with the kids or sumn…

  • http://www.jarrodhalsey.com Jarrod Halsey

    Well I DVR’d it and was going to watch it tonight, but now I guess there really is no reason to. Guess I’ll catch up on America’s Best Dance Crew…

  • miss t-lee

    But good people of VSB.com, did you watch Black in America, and if so, what did you get out of it?

    I only watched the 1st part and this took effort, as ya girl is too cheap to pay for cable. So I went over to my homegirls and we watched it.
    I mean, I understand what maybe CNN was trying to do which is to shed some light to others (non-Blacks) about issues that are prevalent is Black America. To most Black people (unless you’re freakin’ deatched from reality) already know the issues that are in our communities. It was no newsflash to me that Black women are staying single in higher numbers, hell I’m part of that club. They glossed over alot (I only watched the 1st episode, so I’m not sure if that was the issue in the 2nd). It seemed kinda scatterbrained and didn’t flow well. Like you said it would have taken about 2 weeks total for them to tell the WHOLE story. I give them a sideways thumb on this one.
    Did ya’ll check out the CNN comments on the series? That’s some hate for ya azz over there. I read about 10 comments and had to close my browser, cause I was getting heated.