Featured, Lists, Theory & Essay

10 Things About New York City From A Guy Who’s Definitely Not From New York City

I was in New York City for two days last week. I was also there for a couple days in February, 36 hours or so in 2013, and for three days in 2012.

By all accounts, this makes me a New York City expert. And, since I’m a New York City expert, I feel completely comfortable sharing a few observations about the city that are definitely true and definitely not biased or misinformed in any way.

1. New Yorkers are known for being rude and inconsiderate assholes. I’ve found this to be untrue.

I’d even say that, on an individual level, New Yorkers actually tend to be (gasp) nicer than the people I interact with in most other cities. Perhaps I’ve just been lucky enough to encounter some accommodating-ass New Yorkers, but whether I needed directions or recommendations on the best breakfast food within walking distance or recommendations on the best tacos within walking distance, they’ve generally been both extremely helpful and extremely willing to help.

I honestly think the asshole reputation just comes from the fact that everyone moves and talks so fast. Which can give off the impression of rudeness, but it doesn’t seem to be rudeness. They’re just busy. It — and the general sense of being unbothered — also seems to be a protection mechanism. There are a sizable number of legitimately crazy people in that city, and moving slowly or being too outwardly sensitive can be an invitation for them to introduce you to their crazy.

2. If it’s the winter, New York City is colder than wherever you are. 

And by “if it’s the winter” I mean “if it’s any month other than July or August.” It is always (always!) at least 10 degrees colder in NYC than it was wherever you came from to get there. And the weather is deceptive, because you assume a New York 30 degrees is going to feel like a Pittsburgh 30 degrees. But a Pittsburgh 30 is actually a New York 45. And a New York 30 is actually a Pittsburgh -7.

3. Collectively, New York City cab drivers are either the worst or the best drivers on Earth.

I still haven’t quite figured out which one. All I know is that every time I’m in a cab, I get in at least 17 near accidents, but I can’t tell if they’re caused by the driver’s recklessness or if they’re only just near accidents because the drivers are so great at the kamikaze driving that seems to be a job requirement for a New York city cab driver. I’ve never not felt like I was in a scene from The Transporter. 

That said…

4. Catching cabs in New York City is a stupid fucking thing to do.

I had two appointments in the city last week. One of the appointments was a block away from my hotel, so I walked. The other appointment was in a different neighborhood, so I took a cab. When I arrived at my destination and told the person I was meeting that I took a cab, she made a face like a baby holding in a fart. She then proceeded to ask how much the cab was ($19, plus tip) and then let me know I could have caught a train for like 35 cents and got there in half the time. Which I already knew, but trains, well…

5. Riding New York City subways are like sex.

They’re kinda scary and daunting and intimidating before the first time you do it, mainly because of a fear of doing the wrong thing. Also, syphilis. But then you realize that other people are doing it just fine — shit, even kids much younger than you — and you do it yourself and think “Damn…this was fun and easy! Why haven’t I been doing this? And why are my shins wet?

But then, if you haven’t done it in a while, that anxiety comes back. But then you remind yourself (again) of how easy it was and how low your chances are of contracting syphilis.

6. Apparently, there’s absolutely no reason to go to the Bronx.

I don’t mean this as shade. Don’t want Peter Gunz’s gaggle of concubines attacking me on Twitter. This is just reflecting what I’ve heard from New Yorkers, who don’t put “The Bronx” in a sentence without also including “dirty” or “rats” or “roaches” or “strip club shooting” or “Why the hell are you going there?” (or all five) in the sentence as well.

7. There is a Shake Shack at JFK airport. (Multiple Shake Shacks, actually.)

I’m assuming this isn’t unique to New York City and that there are Shake Shacks at other airports in the country, but I know there are multiple Shake Shacks at JFK. And this makes JFK the world’s best airport, and the people who decided to put Shake Shacks at JFK the world’s best people.

8. Things always being open messes with your internal equilibrium.

There’s really no other way to explain the surreality of living somewhere where people’s schedules and activities are determined by when things close, and going somewhere where people’s schedules and activities are not determined by when things close, because things never close. Aside from, I don’t know, sunbathe, anything you can do at 3pm can also be done at 3am. I don’t know if that’s a good or bad thing, but I do know that it fucks with your concept of time and space and hunger.

9. It is true that New Yorkers tend to have an elevated sense of self-importance. It’s very annoying…and perfectly understandable. 

I get as annoyed as everyone else does when meeting a New Yorker who acts as if their city is both the center of the universe and the only place that actually matters. But then you go there. And you walk around. And you happen to walk into the Viacom building — which is only the place where like 89% of the shows currently on TV are produced. And then you walk past Madison Square Garden. And then you walk past the building where the color blue is created and mass produced. And then you walk into the Levi’s store and happen to see Bill Clinton trying on some 522s.

And then you get it.

10. You have to be rich to be an alcoholic in New York City.

I had a $15 cocktail at the bar at my hotel. Which doesn’t seem too outrageous, until you realize that it was happy hour and the cocktails were half off. This is why you read so many redemption stories about former Wall Street executives who became drunks and are now attempting to turn their lives around. They’re the only ones who can afford it.

Damon Young

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB. He is also a columnist for GQ.com And he's working on a book of essays to be published by Ecco (HarperCollins). Damon is busy. He lives in Pittsburgh, and he really likes pancakes. Reach him at damon@verysmartbrothas.com. Or don't. Whatever.

  • miss t-lee

    $15 drinks at happy hour? Absolutely not.
    We’re getting a Shake Shack here in ATX this summer. I’m intrigued to see if it lives up to the hype. I’m not gonna hold my breath though.

    • Rachmo

      We have a few in DC and it makes me so happy.

      • miss t-lee

        Folks hyped up In-N-Out…we got one, I tried it.
        Nope.

        • Val

          You must have had your mind already made up about it. In-N-Out is great!

          • miss t-lee

            No, I didn’t…lol

        • Rachmo

          I LOVE IN-N-OUT CAPS CAPS CAPS

          • miss t-lee

            I’m sorry…lol

        • I was underwhelmed by In-and-Out when I went to San Fran *shrugs*

          • miss t-lee

            Glad to know I’m not alone.
            *daps*

    • $15 drinks at happy hour? Absolutely not.

      nah… That’s an 18-pack of Bud. Might be a 24 on a holiday weekend.

      • But that 18 pack doesn’t come with drunk hoochies pre-prepped. LOL

        • …Love in the time of syphilis…

          • Ironically my current job includes dealing with those tests. I’ll say this; if you raw dog more than 3 times in East NY and none of them involves a committed partner, you should just be forced to try out for special forces. Talk about BRAVE!

            • Nothing makes people dumber than the functions of their genitals. I still don’t understand it and never will.

            • J. D.

              Hey hey. I’m ENY born and raised. Don’t do us like that. lol. But ish is real outchea in these streets.

      • miss t-lee

        It’s a dent in the price of my favorite bottle.
        I’m all the way good.

        • I know right. If I catch the right sale I can get a bottle of Jim Beam for that.

  • ENicole

    I’ll be there this weekend – yay! Trying to convince my friends that we don’t need to uber/cab everywhere…but I doubt I’ll be able to convince them of that. :-/

    • ED

      Fight for what’s right! I’d recommend taking cabs for nighttime partying though. You don’t wanna be waiting for the train at 3 am. You’ll be waiting forever.

      • ENicole

        Good advice! Will definitely take heed. I’ve only been to NYC twice before and never partied while there – so the latest I was on the train was maybe 11 pm. This time we will party so I will see how the cab game goes.

  • Rachmo

    You do not have to be rich to be an alcoholic in NYC. You just have to research the best deals and go to normal places.-Former (current) alkie who lived in NYC

    • #facts. They seem designed to stick up tourists for that liquor money. And the variation can be dramatic on the same BLOCK.

      • Rachmo

        NYC food/drinks are equivalent to or cheaper than DC depending on where you go.

        • Those last five words are so clutch though.

        • jolly

          Right. My new favorite bougie sushi spot HARU (multiple locations and just enough to not have a cheesy chain feel) has happy hour every day food and drinks 5-7 and you can get right on $30.

    • marwilli

      Yeah, you just need to drink in the really dirty places in the East Village and Brooklyn (and c’mon drinking in dirty places seems essential to being an alcoholic). There’s a bunch of places where you can get a (can of) beer and a shot of well liquor for $5.

    • NCQueenCityChick

      I used to be able to get drunk at happy hour in NY for $20 $5 drinks from 5 to 8pm

    • Damon Young

      who has time to be researching ish?

    • S Emm

      I was JUST about to say. That’s the one thing that all NYers have in common, rich or poor. Everyone’s an alchie. You have to drink btwn the hours of 5PM and 8PM or during the day on weekends. dive bars become your best friends.

  • Brandon Allen

    I have always thought Pittsburgh is one of the coldest places in the US but maybe that ls just a result of watching too many Steeler playoff games. New York is cold but it ain’t got nothing on the Midwest. Detroit, Chicago and Buffalo. (Yes, Buffalo is midwestern)

    • marwilli

      I think the cold has more to do with the fact you walk everywhere here, so except maybe Chicago (where I’ve only been to at the tail end of the winter, aka June), we’re spending the most time outside.

      • dmcmillian72

        “…Chicago (where I’ve only been to at the tail end of the winter, aka June)…”

        This is soooooooooooooooooooo TRUE!!! Lol!

    • Thanks for putting Buffalo where they belong!

    • Epsilonicus

      Erie, PA. That is a cold city right there

    • Nicholas Peters

      I thought Buffalo was Canada?

      • Brandon Allen

        It’s also Canada. It’s certainly not New York.

    • Damon Young

      pittsburgh gets very cold, and then it rains for a month, and then it gets very hot, and then it rains for a month again, and then it gets cold again

  • Freebird

    I like New York when I am there but I dont miss it at all when I am not. New York (black) women however might be the gold standard. Bay Area close behind.

    • Val

      I agree with you about NY women. ;-)

      • Freebird

        spoken like a g.

    • marwilli

      I’m pretty sure NY black women invented Thai Food for when they watch Scandal.

    • K Lust

      :) awww

    • h.h.h.

      New York (black) women however might be the gold standard.

      Yes. NYC Black women are the best.

      http://www.reactiongifs.com/r/abed.gif

    • uNk

      Bay Area does have the hunnies #doe

    • Damon Young

      gold standard in what context?

      • Freebird

        I can tell if a woman is from Paris at this point because Parisian women have a way about them that seems connected to the city. New York is a similar place. Its a combination of style, charisma….things that I just can’t articulate too well unless I’m sitting there and it walks into the room, or hear it first hand. In the same way some of us men just have “it” as women would say, NY women can just have “it.”

  • Val

    There are a few reasons to go to the Boogie Down. The Bronx Zoo. Bronx High School of Science. Yankee Stadium.

    But, as someone who grew up in NYC, I’ve only been to the Bronx three times. Once for a school trip to the Bronx Zoo. Once for my sister’s graduation from Bronx Science. And once for a party in Co-op City. Which turned out to be one of the best parties I’ve ever been to.

    • ED

      Sin City is the only thing the Bronx has that I’m interested in lol. I’ve yet to go to a Yankees game and I’ve been to the Bronx zoo twice

      • Val

        Sin City? Mmm, okay, doesn’t sound like my type of hype. Lol

        • ED

          Lol. I hate to say it but the only bad thing I have to say about Sin City is that some of the Hispanic stirppers are way too aggressive.

    • LMNOP

      The beaches.

      • Val

        Huh?

        • LMNOP

          In the Bronx.

          • Val

            You mean on City Island?

            • LMNOP

              Yeah and I feel like there’s another big beach near city island.

              • Val

                Orchard beach?

                • LMNOP

                  Yeah. I just looked that up. Apparently there is actually only one public beach in the Bronx. Maybe it’s a big beach, idk, I haven’t been there in like 10 years.

                  • Val

                    Just the thought of going to the beach in the Bronx makes me itch. Lol We always went to Long Island.

                    • h.h.h.

                      the thought of going to a beach on long island makes me itch. lol.

                      (well, at least going into the water)

                    • Val

                      Mauntauk? That’s a great beach. Jones is okay for a quick trip and Fire Island is nice.

                    • h.h.h.

                      haven’t been to Montauk yet, i usually hang at Jones or Long Beach/ Lido beach…. long beach is dope at night

                    • Val

                      Try Mauntauk when you get a chance. It’s beautiful.

                    • ED

                      Don’t sleep on Far Rock

                  • Well, if you like Puerto Ricans and Dominicans in small swimsuits, you’re in luck. There’s a reason it’s called Chocha Beach…

    • Unicorn Tears

      Here’s the thing with the boroughs in general, NYC is huge and traveling to other boroughs that seem too far just doesn’t seem to make sense when you can do something similar that’s significantly closer. Now I was born and raised in the Wakefield section of the Bronx which is one of the last train stops on the 2 line. Growing up, I think I only went to Brooklyn maybe 3-4 times total. Staten Island I’ve literally only been to once when I was maybe 10. Why? Because it was too dam far and I could do pretty much the same things in the Bronx, Manhattan or Westchester. Queens I went to a little more frequently because I had family there and it’s a closer drive (if you want to pay toll). Most people from any borough will express the same feeling of traveling too far.

      What I tell most people, there are good and bad areas everywhere, so yes there are bad areas in the Bronx, but we have nicer areas as well (Throggs Neck, Riverdale, Pelham Bay, etc) as well as a lot of places to go (Bronx Zoo, Botanical Gardens, Wave Hill, City Island, etc.). The question is, if you live on the other side of the city and it’s a 90 minute commute by train or 45 min-1 hour car ride, are you necessarily willing to make that trek?

      Now factor in the rapid gentrification in the city which spilled over into Brooklyn and Queens but didn’t hit the Bronx because we border northern Manhattan. So all that funding went into gentrifying Harlem and now Washington Heights. So here we are in post-gentrified NYC 2015 where Brooklyn (a place where I would’ve had few reasons to visit growing up) is the most expensive place to live in the COUNTRY and neighborhoods in Queens and Manhattan are just as pricey and hipster-filled, of course that will lead to more funding, resources and activities in those areas which will cause more of an influx of tourists and professionals there. When you’re not seeing the same flashy, cool things popping up in the Bronx it’s easy to say there’s no reason to go there but that’s because you just don’t know where to go lol. I went away for undergrad and came back to live in the Bronx and I’ll have people visit and are “surprised” at the fact there’s working professionals living up here and nice neighborhoods because all they’ve seen are “the bad areas.” It just boils down to knowing where to go, which most people who aren’t from there just don’t have that knowledge.

      • Damon Young

        informative comment

        • The thing about the Five Boroughs is that it has more people than 41 STATES. Whatever stereotype a borough has, there’s a spot within it that defies it. The Bronx has Riverdale, which is White and well-off. Queens has a rep as a Borough of houses, but Long Island City can look like Manhattan with less traffic and wider streets. Brooklyn is known for hipsters and hoodlums, but there’s a large non-hipster White population, mostly to the south with the exception of Coney Island. (Coney Island is hood as f*ck, but they flood the area with enough cops to keep the tourists alive). Staten Island is the most Italian county in the union, yet where Eric Garner got bodied is hood as ALL fuck. Plus, they have enough forest land there that they have a Boy Scout campground there.

          Trust me when I say New York City is a very weird place.

          • Unicorn Tears

            It is. It definitely lives up to the term melting pot lol.

      • Cleojonz

        Every time I think I should at least ride the Staten Island ferry I figure nah I’m good. I’ve spent a nice amount of time in every other borough (I’m in Southern CT) I don’t guess I’ll ever make it to Staten Island.

        BTW my dream is to hit lotto move and send my kids to Riverdale schools. No lie.

        Is Wave Hill worth a visit? I keep seeing they have events there and I’ve been meaning to check it out.

        • Unicorn Tears

          @Cleojonz, Dude! Horace Mann in Riverdale is ranked one of the best schools in the country and is one of the most expensive so the person who commented how poor the Bronx has definitely never been in that area. If I had the money I would absolutely send my kids to school there too.

          I think Wave Hill is worth the visit, especially if there is an event there. It’s not particularly big but worth it if you’re attending an event or having lunch somewhere uptown.

        • Wave Hill is lovely – great views of the Palisades and little garden type stuff.

        • HeyBooHey

          Everytime I drive through SI on my way up to Queens, I think the SAME thing. “I should ride the ferry and see what Staten Island is really like”. Never happens. My mom used to go to school out there waaaayyy back when and said it’s nice. I’ll just take her word for it smh

          Riverdale though?!? Smh, my mom knows someone who lives in that real high falootin part of the Bronx that few people know about. Man listen…

        • HaitianMarie

          During the very first week of HS we were trying to get to know our new schoolmates; I asked the tall blonde a few lockers away where she was from. She said ” Riverdale”. I thought, how the fuck did you get into this school when you’re from some place in Jersey? Westchester County? Maybe even CT? So I inquired further and asked, where is that? She said with what sounded like a damn valley girl accent to my Carribbean BK ears,” Riverdale! Riverdale! Ri.ver.dale.?!” As if this would jog my memory of a place I’d never heard of. Thankfully the other white girl who turned out to live in the tippy tip top part of Manhattan-so they caught the train together I guess, said, “it’s the Bronx”. It dawned on me that apparently the Bronx is a tale of 2 cities.
          And yes, if I hit the lotto, I’d move my moms there.

          • Cleojonz

            I like your description of a take of two cities. It’s almost like driving down U.S. 1 in Florida and you will literally see a mansion right next to a trailer park. Definitely two vastly different living experiences in the same geographical location.

      • Val

        *scratches head* I’m not sure why your reply is aimed at me. Like I said, I grew up in NY so yeah, I get what you’re saying. I guess you just wanted to get the ‘I grew up in NY and here’s what I know’ comment out of your system?

        • Unicorn Tears

          @val please don’t be sensitive. My comment was more for Damon. If it was directed to you I would’ve @ your name. I just so happened to add it under your comment because it was apart of the whole BX thread . #tisall Have a good day!

      • Guess Deez

        I appreciate this post… (sniff sniff)

      • S Emm

        I agree here. I grew up in Queens and literally didn’t visit Harlem until college when all the boughie black transplants started moving in. there was just never any need. I went from Queens, to BK, to the city.

        But low-key, don’t sleep on Staten Island. I worked out there for 3 months and had some of the BEST Italian food of my life there. I ALMOST want to get on the ferry to make that trek again.

      • HeyBooHey

        I’d agree. I was born and raised in Queens, never went beyond unless I had to in HS. On the train, anything beyond parts of BK and Manhattan was too damn long and far out so you never went. I didn’t hit the Bronx until I had friends who lived there Senior yr. and barely went outside of Midtown until I got lost and ended up in Harlem. There’s literally so much to see and do in NYC and all the boroughs have different things to offer. I find myself missing it enough to wanna visit more…in the summer…ok maybe spring/early summer cuz mid-late summers in NYC is another damn story…

    • Damon Young

      And Chicago is always colder than where you are. It’s definitely always colder than NYC.

      this is true. chicago is the coldest city on earth

    • S Emm

      +1000000000000 on the Chicago note. The Chicago cold makes you question your ENTIRE existence.

    • Asiyah

      The Bronx Zoo is amazing!

      Hiya, Val! <3

      • Val

        Hiya, Asiyah!

        *waves*

        The next time I’m in NYC I need to visit the zoo again. It’s been a while.

  • pls

    i love ny. ny’ers are always on one, though.

    • The thing is that if you take a bit off, you could have a life changing experience. I mean death or serious dismemberment. The schemes and craziness are DEEP here.

  • CNotes

    I used to live in the Bronx years ago and I agree that it is not on most people’s list of places to visit (I didn’t even like living there….lol). However, I must say that I have had some of the BEST pizza and Jamaican food (outside of JA) at restaurants there. Even while living in Brooklyn, I had some amazing food, but still found myself craving food from the BX spots. Stone me if you must, but it is true.

    • And there is Belmont. That place is a random Italian food Wonderland surrounded by guns everywhere.

      • uniquebeauty79

        I’d have to take my chances on it, iLove me some Italian. Authentic will get me shot but I don’t care I would die happy. lol

        • Belmont is fun, but cross an invisible line, and you’re in a hot block. LOL

          • uniquebeauty79

            LOL, I’ll keep you on speed dial and check blocks as I cross!

    • *hugs*

    • Val

      “…the BEST pizza and Jamaican food (outside of JA…”

      I have to disagree, CNotes. I can’t imagine any borough or any State for that matter that has better Jamaican food that in Brooklyn on Flatbush. And Queens has the best pizza. :-)

      • CNotes

        @disqus_QGKOTi1oX5:disqus …… I’ve had great food in BK on Flatbush, but I do love Rocatone on White Plains Road in BX. Now, pizza in Queens……I cannot challenge because I have never tried it there. So, the next time I’m there I will give it a shot. :-)

        • Val

          Try Gloria’s Pizza. They have a few different locations so just go0gle them. The best!

          • CNotes

            Will do…Thanks!!!

          • uNk

            Well im headed to NYC in early September, ill have to try that place….im gona need a reference for best Jamaican food in Brooklyn

            • Asiyah

              Do give the Bronx a chance, too. It’s much more diverse than people give it credit :)

            • cake211

              blakes international on church ave and troy ave. CnJs on Utica and Linden stays open until 2 am if you having a late night craving for a decent taste.

        • Unicorn Tears

          Rocatone and GoldStar on White Plains Road for the WIN!!!! That section of the Bronx is also known as little Jamaica so all the West Indians live up there.

          • CNotes

            Yep! :-) I lived in that neighborhood and learned pretty quickly that it was dubbed little Jamaica. I felt like I was the only American around those parts.

            • Unicorn Tears

              @cnotes:disqus I went to elementary school not too far from there. Everyone in my school was West Indian. I honestly didn’t meet a “regular black” person (which was still few and far between) until high school which took me a while to get used to because everyone’s parents were from somewhere lol. I’d be like…..”so you’re parents are just from here? So where are you grandparents from?…..here too?!?! what??” Lol.

              • CNotes

                To be a black American in that area was to be foreign. LOL….too funny!

                • But very accurate. And around Yankee Stadium has become home of the African immigrants while the Puerto Ricans all move to Westchester or Orange County.

          • Jamaicans have their own little hideaway boxed in between White Plains, Pelham Parkway and the Dyre Ave line. Fun spot there.

      • MSNY

        Been in NJ now a year and I still crave that East Flatbush Jamaican food.

    • cancergirl08

      Any recs on spots in Brooklyn for Italian and Southern food? I’ll be there at the end of May.

      Oh and if you have lounge recommendations for the 25+ crowd, I’ll take those too!

      • Do you want boogie or downhole southern food? For boogie, go to SoCo and thank me later For down home, there is this spot on Atlantic Ave and I want to say Vermont. Go to Yelp though. They’ll give you the precise address. Trust me.

        • HeyBooHey

          Ditto on SoCo, food is bomb and the atmosphere is pretty cool. Wish I could remember the Italian spot I went to in Chelsea, had the freshest ingredients I’ve ever had in my life.

          • Based on your description, it’s probably Eataly. I’ve heard nothing but good things about them.

            http://www.eataly.com

            • HeyBooHey

              Ugh that wasn’t it, but now I wanna go there!!! It wasn’t a chain restaurant, I actually went for work while I was at NYC Tax Dept so I wonder if they’re even still open lol. You’d totally miss it if you walked past, it’s either Chelsea or the SoHo area actually. Cutest place and I still dream about that food…

      • CNotes

        I like Ruthie’s on Myrtle Ave. And I am very picky about my southern food being that I’m from Louisiana. :-)

        • What’s the cross street? I may swing through.

          • CNotes

            Emerson Place, I believe.

    • Medium Meech

      Clem.. CNotes!

      • CNotes

        Hahahahaha!!!!! What up Meech! XOXO

    • uNk

      Im still at a crossroads with the best Jamaican food in the US coming from Miami or NYC…..

      • CNotes

        Hmmm….I did actually go to a spot in Miami for Jamaican food (can’t remember the name, but it is pretty popular) and it was good.

    • Mika

      I may have to say the BX is up there for jamaican food, not a lot of people know about it, which is great lol. We frequented the BX (gun hill road to be exact) to get some good jamaican grub when I used to live in dirty jersey.

    • Asiyah

      The Bronx is amazing. I absolutely love it. I moved from Harlem to the X 6 years ago and I never want to leave. Especially now that I moved from the dirty ghetto of the X to Kingsbridge Heights/Riverdale. Todd’s been up there to see me. Can you tell I’m happier, Todd?

  • 1. Very well stated. The pace seems throw out of towners off. Also, you’re easy to pick up by body language. Be careful.
    2. NYC weather is strange. Manhattan, the Outer Boroughs, the inner suburbs (roughly within I287 and the Seaford Oyster Bay Expressway) and the Outer Boroughs have very different climates. That Canyon and heat Island effect is Real. Plus the Mountains and East End of Long Island have their own weird quirks.
    3. I blame the passengers. I’ve seen some bizarre f*cksh*the done because of them. Like serve across 5 lanes of traffic at 45 meh strange.
    4. #facts
    5. Explained how I felt every time I came home from college.
    6. The Bronx has its positives. City Island (aka seafood restaurant wonderland) is official. Plus the best burrito spot East of the Mississippi (Tlaxcali Taquiera) is there. But the Bronx is po. Like can’t afford the OR poor.
    7. OVERRATED! *CLAP CLAP CLAPCLAPCLAP*
    8. I struggle with the idea that nothing can be open at places. There is usually something open.
    9. Yep! Then again this is someone who walked into the Empire state building. And by walk in, I mean faceplate into it while running off of 2 hours sleep.
    10. It’s a trap! Avoid the tourist and rich people spots, and your booze bill will go down like 50-60%

    • Val

      Oh, yeah, I forgot about City Island. I’ve yet to meet anyone who is actually from there though.

      • Cleojonz

        I don’t think there actually are any black people from city island. It seems to be mostly Italian and the houses never go on the market they just pass from family member to family member. Apparently there’s a bunch of artsy stuff to do there too and cute boutique shops. I’ve only ever been for seafood though.

    • Damon Young

      tell me more about this city island

      • Unicorn Tears

        @Damon Young:disqus City Island is THE place to get seafood in NYC. There’s one main strip that is lined with all seafood restaurants. All different price points and vibes. It’s a summer staple for anyone from the Bronx, Westchester or upper Manhattan. Serving sizes are huge so you’ll definitely get your monies worth on some of the best seafood anywhere. This also goes to my point further down thread that if you’re not from the area you may not know it exists but it’s definitely worth the ride to go.

        My only advice is to AVOID that place on holidays (Mother’s Day, Easter, 4th of July, etc). There’s only 1 bridge to get on the island and you may be stuck in traffic an hour or longer just to even make it on there.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Island,_Bronx

        • h.h.h.

          ^^ Truth Speaker right there.

        • Cleojonz

          Don’t forget Southern CT. I remember many a Saturday summer night where my parents would randomly be like we’re going out and would be at like 11 o’clock at night. Well they would be headed for the pier at city island. I was probably like 11 or 12 and we could be trusted not to burn the house down. CPS would be called today lol.

          • Unicorn Tears

            Lmao at your parents…..sigh, this makes me want to go to City Island this week-end lol

      • I was going to type my response, but Unicorn Tears nailed it. Also, it’s a cheap getaway for the wife person. It looks like a quaint fishing village, and because it’s an island surrounded by a park, you can buy it, so long as you pretend the Co-Op City buildings in the distance don’t exist.

  • thepopculturist

    As a native Pittsburgher having lived in NYC for the past 10 years now, whenever I complain about the cold, people always say “Aren’t you from Pittsburgh, you should be used to this!!” Yes, Pittsburgh is usually colder temperature wise than NYC in the winter. The difference is, in Pittsburgh and pretty much every other city in the US, people drive everywhere. NYC is a walking city, so yes it is going to feel colder because you actually have to face the elements. Plus all the tall building tend to create wind tunnels. And having to trudge through snow and sludge and dirty slush puddles every day on your way to work. Don’t know if you ever noticed, but NYers always have very stylish yet functional winter boots lol.

    • #facts Depending on whether I’m driving or traveling on foot affects how I dress on a given day.

    • marwilli

      And the walking everywhere just eats up your shoes. I’ve had salt consume a pair of leather chukkas I owned and have replaced the soles and heels on multiple pairs of shoes many times.

    • Damon Young

      “The difference is, in Pittsburgh and pretty much every other city in the US, people drive everywhere. NYC is a walking city, so yes it is going to feel colder because you actually have to face the elements.”

      good point. never considered how much more outdoor walking i do there than anywhere else

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