Featured, Race & Politics, Theory & Essay

The Search For The Soul Ben Carson Once Possessed

Dear Ben Carson,

Yesterday, you said that enslaved people were immigrants, and whether you believe that deep down in the soul you used to possess, one can never know. Nevertheless, I am going to talk to you even though I fear you vacated your body a long time ago. I believe you sent yourself away where no one could touch you. You went crazy first and now you exist in parts. You, dear Ben, are a man who once was. But being a woman of hope, I ask: can you walk a ways and see where your heart is? I imagine it used to beat with such vigor and passion, a magic heart.

I believe you are dying a slow death in the shell of your skin, because what else could bring you to say enslaved human beings who were stacked atop each other with no room to move or breathe or relieve themselves, who were starved and whipped and raped, who were ripped from their husbands and wives and from their children—many of whom died during the treacherous journey, their bones their only song now at the bottom of dead seas made holy now by their gleam—were immigrants? They were enslaved, Ben. They were worked, often, to death, for nothing. That’s call slavery, Ben. It went on for four centuries. Ben, did you know they were in chains? Ben, what immigrants be in chains? Ben, you sound so stupid, but unfortunately, you are not merely stupid. If you were merely stupid, this would not cause us such outrage. Ben, we knew a while ago that you had become…different. Conservative. Ignorant. Bigoted. You didn’t look or talk like the Ben who was once ours—the way the Temptations are ours, the way Barack and Michelle are ours, the way Anita Baker is ours, the way Maxine Waters is ours, the way gospel and the blues are ours. But we weren’t enough for you. Our love wasn’t good enough for you, and neither was self-love. Even the best Uncle Toms can be said to have been bought. Oh, Ben. I do not believe anyone bought your soul; I believe you just gave it away. And you can’t stand yourself no more. I might’ve felt bad enough to weep for you, except you chose this.

I don’t know where your hands have been, even though I know what they used to be: beautiful, brilliant hands, soft as an angel’s wing, doing God’s mighty work. Ben, you think you doing God’s work now? You ain’t. No one loves you enough to tell you because everyone in your circle is still clinging to the Ben Carson you used to be in hopes that, maybe, you could return. But I sense no one is holding their breath on that. Your new, white friends must love all that you have become: a lonesome shell that is either silent or, when he speaks, deadly.

Though I believe you are gone, gone, gone, I got to at least tell you about yourself. Ben, how many Black boys and girls wanted to be doctors and surgeons because of you? But look what you did yesterday: you made racist white people—and even non-racist white people—get off for slavery. Yeah, you did that. I know it can’t sting you just right because you deadened yourself a while back. Nevertheless. You made them believe we wanted that torture and terror. Ben, do you realize you made them believe it was okay to steal us from our first homes? That somehow, slavery was part of our striving? Ben, do you know you told them we wanted that? That we believe it was all worth it for the American Dream, which for many of us, remains a trick? Ben, your hands dirty. They ain’t just dirty, though, Ben. Your hands bloody. Your hands bloody with Black blood. You put bodies on those ships yesterday. You put chains on little children. You said “immigrants” as if we chose. As if that could even be possible. If you were only stupid, Ben. But no.

It’s sad that you have chosen to be comatose because they were jealous and couldn’t take your Black genius, how you understood the brain—back then— the way Morrison understands language or the way Miles knew his horn. Ben, you are probably struggling with whom I mean when I say they. I mean white people. I see you shaking your head at that Ben, but they were lesser than you because they couldn’t stand all the genius you were. They hated the way your mind outmaneuvered theirs. Oh, Ben. I can only imagine the landmines of micro and macro aggressions you withstood, on the regular. You were a beautiful brown tree, and they were a hurricane. A fist formed to pound you. I can only imagine the word “nigger” on repeat and all the countless, creative ways they called you that, day in and day out. After all, their greatest creativity is their brutality. The more creative your genius became, the more they reviled you. The more rootless you felt. You let it sink into the bone, how much they hated you. You let them wear you out. Their whiteness haunted you. Their whiteness said you ain’t shit, and you believed them because you wanted their love.

Why was our love not enough? Did we not hold you up? Did we not whisper your name at Sunday dinners? Did we not pray for God to keep working through your hands? Did we not know your name like we know Dr. King’s? Oh, Ben. Our love is the best love, baby. It’s a shame you couldn’t know that when it mattered, back when your soul was in its place, back when your heart beat on time. Your hands used to do magic work. Oh, Lord, your beautiful hands! Now they don’t have no witness to speak of. They just fold in your lap. I can almost hear them: Well, Lord. We tried.

Ben…what happened to Ben Carson?

I know he gone. But do you know where you put him? Did you drown him where they drowned Emmett? Was he shot in his driveway like Medgar? Was he bombed on Christmas Eve? Did you lock him in a cell and throw away the key? Did you cut out his tongue when you took away his heart and his soul? Can you count the lives you touched? Then broke? Does Ben know that number?

No, you don’t even dream anymore.

Ben, I have always believed Baby Suggs, holy, of Morrison’s Beloved when she said, “There is no bad luck in the world but whitefolks. They don’t know when to stop.” Then she died. I thought that was the end-all. But you have bested even her. There ain’t no bad luck in the world, I offer as revision, but a Black man who hates himself. Because that man can do no good. All he can do is make the folks who once loved him wonder if it was a phantom all that time. You made the descendants of the so-called masters feel like they were doing us a favor. Four hundred years of “good looking out.” Oh, Ben. How you disappoint. 

You need to know you should stop talking. I believe silence is golden right now while you go out there and find your real tongue—the tongue that used to raise people from what would have been a certain death without first your tongue declaring what you were about to do, then your hands doing that magic on operating tables. Lord, how you used to shine in that operating room. How you used to shine everywhere. Don’t you miss your shine? Do you remember how it felt to glow? Naw. I don’t imagine you do.

Ben, I can’t stand you no more or the sound of your voice. I remember who you were, though. Part of why we’re out here dragging you for life is not just because you deserve it, but because your mouth is an open wound, and you hurt us with your lies yesterday. We bear the memory of what you used to mean to us. Once, I would have loved to introduce my son to you. That time has passed. I’d believe you might have a chance to come back if it wasn’t for your eyes. They are such lifeless, dead things.

You still got breath, from what it looks like. You have to have breath to be talking, even though you should stop. Can you use your breath as a starting point? I’d hoped you might’ve left your soul someplace where you can go back for it. But yesterday, you snatched pretty much all hope of that. Still and all. I write to you. Maybe something inside of you is still alive. You owe us an apology, you sad, sad shell of what used to be a man worthy of our esteem, our respect, our devotion, and our love. Now, all we got for you is shade. And scorch. Even if you uttered sorry, all we would hear is lifeless noise. So. Keep it.

But this:

Ben, put your eyes back in. See what you did to yourself. Amidst a sea of brown love that washed over you, back then, as a prayer, you waded out into deep water and went under. Now you work for a spoiled, hateful, incompetent soul. You salute to him. Those splinters in your feet are from the pedestal we put you on, that you shattered. Oh. How you bleed.

I leave you, bewildered but not surprised.

Tameka Cage-Conley

Tameka Cage Conley, PhD is a literary artist who writes poetry, fiction, plays, and essays. She has received writing fellowships from Cave Canem, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, the Vermont Studio Center, the August Wilson Center for African American Culture, and the Squaw Valley Community of Writers. She is published in a number of journals and literary magazines, including Callaloo, African American Review, Fledgling Rag, and Huizache, and is completing her first novel and poetry collection. She is an MFA Candidate in Fiction at the Iowa Writer's Workshop.

  • jigg_uppa

    Carson was given a seat at the table of white supremacy a long time ago. He aint never getting up.

    • Mary Burrell

      And that’s a tragedy

  • grownandsexy2

    Clearly Ben Carson didn’t watch “Roots.” Not that I did either, because I had to work the next day with 2520s, but even I know we didn’t come by way of Ellis Island. We were not willing participants. The slave narrative and the immigrant narrative are two whole different animals.

    • Tam

      The series or movie? Saw the movie read the book and as a student of history I used to read a lot of first hand account. I would recommend that Dr Carson read ” In Miserable Slavery” , or any other first hand account.

      • grownandsexy2

        The series. I have never watched the movie or the series and it’s shown periodically. Always hated history until I took some black history courses in college cause no one looked like me. Ben needs to read something.

        • Tam

          Ok. Didn’t pay attention to the rebooted series. As a WI we were taught all about slavery from primary school, so there was no getting away from it.

          • grownandsexy2

            We were never taught about slavery in school. What I knew was from older family members.

            • Tam

              So everyone just came over on the Mayflower?

              • grownandsexy2

                Pretty much. lol. What we learned about Africa and its people was learned on Saturday morning in front of the TV, the Tarzan series with spear chucking Africans in loin cloths being showcased as ignorant and backwards savages. Africa and anything connected to it was and still is a source of shame for many older blacks.

                • Tam

                  But you know that many persons still have that view of Africa. I have heard retired teachers making statements akin to the fact that all Africans aren’t running around in loin cloths or aware of western clothing. Btw, have you ever seen ” the god’s must be crazy” in retrospect that movie is as racists a frig

                  • grownandsexy2

                    Yeah, even young people have that view. Philly has a pretty sizable African population and every once in a while, one of their children is in the news for getting harassed, ridiculed and beaten by their black classmates for that very reason. Ignorance. They’re harassed and ridiculed because of their accents, skin color and ignorance of what Africa is really like.

                    A few years ago, a group of black women visited Africa and were actually laughing and making fun of the natives physical features, which as it was pointed out, looked just like their own features. So what does that say about how they view themselves?

                    I haven’t seen “The Gods Must be Crazy” but I’ll check it out.

                • Alessandro De Medici
              • Mr. Mooggyy

                Naw. There was also the Negro, Pablo and the Santa Ma-Arabs! We came along behind the WhiteFlower, looking for peace and volunteering our services for free 99! Don’t forget about the Natives! They were ecstatic to help the 2520s colonize their land!

                • La Bandita

                  haha and now EVERY wyte has native blood. Where were you guys during the trail of tears?

                  • Val

                    Right. Lol Including Elizabeth Warren.

                    • Mr. Mooggyy

                      I like ol’ Beth Warren! But, she does pander a bit much!

            • can i ask where you and your family is from?

              • grownandsexy2

                I was born and raised in Philly and both my parents were born here also. My maternal grandmother and father were from Georgia. Paternal grandmother from St. Stephens, VA, paternal grandfather from North Carolina.

                • Kas loves Jamaican Breakfast

                  You seem so cool I was sure you had a branch in Arkansas. :)

                  • grownandsexy2

                    Arkansas, huh? People from the states ask if I’m from the south, cause friendly, easy to talk to and I get asked if I’m from the islands a lot. Africans think I’m from the motherland. From them I get, “so where are you from in Africa.”

                    • Kas loves Jamaican Breakfast

                      The best people are from Arkansas. Texans will tell you differently, but don’t believe them.

                    • grownandsexy2

                      “The best people are from Arkansas”
                      So I’m told.

            • Brown Rose

              I remember my fifth grade teacher dismissing slavery out of hand. She was way more passionate about the plight of Native Americans. Luckily my Dad had a lot of “Black books” including roots. at 10 I read up to the part where Kunta got captured along with the the slave ship journey and threw it down and wouldn’t read the rest for months. I was traumatized.

              • grownandsexy2

                Was your fifth grade teacher black? My elementary school teachers in first, second, fifth and sixth grade were black but slavery was not part of the curriculum. The limits of our mis-education was George Washington Carver, Marian Anderson and maybe two others whose names escapes me.

                I always read a lot so I always had books, but my dad had firsthand accounts from my paternal great grandmother who was born in slavery and lived with my grandmother after both were widowed. She was lucky to have survived slavery and live as long as she did. She was 100 when she died.

                My niece has family in New Orleans and when I visit, I pick one of the elder’s brain for history. She always says, “Chile, the things I’ve seen.”

                • Brown Rose

                  White teacher. Catholic school. A black teacher huh? Man it never ends. I am thinking now , I learned about the black experience through my Dad’s books, my Dad, and my grandma mostly. My own research as I got older. Library of Congress has some recording if trump and Bannon and miller don’t burn them.

                  That is amazing that you had actual first hand experience from elders about slavery. Impressive. Have you ever thought of putting their stories down in a book or recording?

                  • grownandsexy2

                    I don’t blame my black teachers tho for not teaching black history. II suppose they were following the curriculum. I also remember learning a little about the holocaust. My third grade teacher was Jewish. I sent my daughter to a black private school, whose founders and teachers were black and black history was part of their everyday. I still remember some of her black history homework that was taught to poems for every letter of the alphabet. lol.

                    Funny you should mention putting the elders stories in a book or recording. I have. I thought about a recording. A neighbor and I were discussing her dad’s time in WWII, his experiences traveling the world and his trials and tribulations as a black man navigating during those times. She had to do a project for a class she was taking and used her dad’s experiences and recorded them. She said before that, he had never discussed them with anyone. Anywho, she made me consider doing something similar. Especially since I’m in the process of putting the family tree together.

                    Every now and then I see a comment from white folks saying no one alive today knew any slaves. They forget, slavery wasn’t really all that long ago and there are a lot of older black folks who have a history of longevity in the family (such as my dad) who remember their enslaved family members.

                    • Brown Rose

                      That is wonderful. I really wish I could research my tree in a coherent manner. Its pretty scattered. I really hope that you do put it to recording either voice and/or video. This is the kind of history that needs to be treasured for posterity–to remind us all about who we are as a people.

                    • grownandsexy2

                      Stop wishing and make it happen. You can research your family tree and it’s free too. You don’t have to go to Ancestry.com where they charge you. Familysearch.org and Familytreenow.com are two wonderful search engines. Census records and everything is right there. I even found my parents’ marriage application from the 1940s, when we were referred to as “colored.” lol. Some of the records list whether they were renting, their level of education, occupation, etc.

                      Sometimes you can discover other search engines when you’re looking for people. I was looking for an acquaintance for a friend and came across a site called Mooseroots.com, where you can locate deceased love ones in whatever cemetery they’re buried in. There are people I lost touch with, looked for, only to find out they had died which is always a bummer.

                      That’s my other pastime, looking for people for friends and family. I get a kick out of it and am thinking about hanging out a shingle with, “If they’re dead I can find them, if they’re living I can find them too.” lol. And when friends find out I can find folks, of course, everyone has a long lost love they want me to find and I’m happy to oblige. Making love connections everywhere. lol. So give it a whirl. You may be pleasantly surprised.

                    • Brown Rose

                      OMG you would make gobs of money as a skip tracer. I am serious. You probably should hang out a shingle. Its true. I started a little but records were bad in the Caribbean and parts of the US. I did find out that my grandmother was right about my grandfather–that he was a welterweight boxer–when I did a search, what I didn’t know was that he lost just as many fights as he won. But you are right–I need to look a little bit harder.

                • Nik White

                  The two names were probably Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King (possibly George Washington Carver & the peanut ).

                  • grownandsexy2

                    I just cackled when I read your reply cause I’m no spring chick. lol. I did mention that we learned about George Washington Carver in school. But any education I received about Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King was not in school. It was in the daily paper, Jet and Ebony magazines and on the tongues of every black person as it was unfolding in real time. In other words, I lived the experience. I was a young un during that time. I was old enough to march with MLK and wanted to attend the March, but my parents were worried for my safety. So I was glued to the TV set that historic day.

                    When I visited the new AA museum with my granddaughter this past Thanksgiving, I remember her saying, “Lord, grandma, you lived through some of this stuff.”

                    The other one or two figures that were mentioned in school still eludes me, so imma have to check with my girlfriend. Maybe she remembers.

              • grownandsexy2

                Dayuum shame how our history was ignored and dismissed. I can’t stomach slave movies so I never watched Roots. Folks are generally surprised when I say that. I remember when my granddaughter was young, she asked me why I hated white people. And then she saw Roots with my great niece. She came storming in my house one day, pissed off. lol. I still chuckle when I picture it. She told me, “I see why you hate white people.” My niece said they were both hollerin’ and throwing shoes at the TV. lol

                • Brown Rose

                  Me neither. I refuse to watch the original Roots. Cannot deal with watching anything related to slavery or even really the Jim Crow South. I used to read and research a lot of that stuff when I was younger—but now I am really fatigued and it saddens and angers me. The weight of our history the legacy of slavery, degradation, and debasement and how Black Americans fought and continue to fight it–makes me so proud, yet profoundly angry.

                  • grownandsexy2

                    I hear you. I get too angry, and look at white folks differently. Would you believe one of my niece’s classmates is named Kunta Kinte? Why would they do that to their child? Why??? He has a black dad and Puerto Rican mom I think.

                    • Brown Rose

                      Kunta kinte?!? I can’t even. Weird man. Nope my imagination is very vivid. I really don’t need more visual aids to understand slavery and Jim Crow and America in general. It’s a painful, horrible past, that is always with us. Always.

                    • grownandsexy2

                      My niece said the school has a rule where the kids aren’t allowed to call him by his full name and says he takes his name in stride. I wonder how he really feels tho. It’s bad enough that we’re discriminated against seeking employment if your name immediately identifies you as black but can you imagine what awaits this poor kid? I’d get my name changed if I were him.

                    • Brown Rose

                      I can relate. My real name is definitely Black or at least foreign. I definitely have gotten discriminated or ignored because of it. Poor kid.

                    • grownandsexy2

                      Even if you have a name that’s not identifiable as Black, discrimination can still rear its ugly head once there is a face-to-face meeting. I remember one story of a Black man who got a call back based on his resume and being lauded during a phone interview for having gone to a stellar business school. The powers to be were excited to meet him until he actually had an in-person interview. He said they were really surprised to see that he was a Black man as was apparent in their faces and the awkward 45 second silence that followed. He said he knew right then he wasn’t going to get the job and he didn’t.

                      Zip codes are another way to discriminate. If you live in a zip code that is populated by Black folks, you may not get a call back. I can think of one law firm in the city where all the attorneys are Jewish and all the support staff are Irish. Jewish because the hiring partner is Jewish and Irish because the hiring manager is Irish. SMH

                    • Brown Rose

                      This is not surprising. Sad nto surprising. Another form of racism that apparently nonblacks dont believe. Of course this happened to me. I always sound great on the phone. Even with my name they are surprised when I am black.

          • Mochasister

            The American public school system doesn’t really teach about slavery or any of the achievements that Black Americans have done here. If we want to learn something about ourselves, we either have to read history books on own or wait to take African American history courses in college.

    • C. M.

      Word. I don’t know any black folks that consider themselves immigrants to the Americas.

    • Nik White

      He’s old enough to have seen the origins and purchase a set up tapes for his vcr! Don’t make no dang sense!

  • Val

    So, we all seem to assume that Carson once had a soul. My question is, did he? Honestly I wasn’t familiar with him prior to him being involved in politics. I have no idea what he was like before then.

    Was he spewing respectability politics back in the day? Was he giving poundcake speeches? Has he always been a Republican? A c00n?

    Anyone know? Because we might be wasting out time on someone who was a lost cause long ago and doesn’t want to be saved.

    • He’s from Detroit, right? It’s a soulful place.

      • Val

        I watch Parking Wars Detroit so I happen to know for a fact that Detroit Black folks have a soul.

        • truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

          Detroit has a long history of strong, soulful black people indeed.

          • Nik White

            Ben is a pod person

      • Nik White

        Indeed it is but ole boy ain’t lived here in years.

    • Brown Rose

      My initial clue is his religious affiliation. Fundamentalist Adventist. However his tone was more moderate back in the early 2010’s. It became much more craven to white people–which just shows that he knows what he is doing and makes him even more bankrupt.

      • Jennifer

        I got SDA friends who are asking what can be done about Carson. They are not happy with him either.

        • Brown Rose

          Glad to hear some adventist saying that

    • Epsilonicus

      He was not doing that at all. He was all about telling little Black kids that they have dreams and can achieve it. He came to my schools and after school programs so many times. He was not a Cosby or Larry Elder.

      • Jennifer

        Even when I was living on B-More a decade ago, he was still doing this positive message.

        • Epsilonicus

          Right. I know folks who worked with him closely and even they are confused.

          • orchid921

            Same here. They’re stunned.

          • Question

            Yea hubby tells stories of him coming to his all-boys school in Baltimore and Carson going out of his way to pay more attention to the questions of the young black boys in his class…

            • Epsilonicus

              Which school did your hubby go to if you don’t mind me asking? I attended one in Baltimore too

              • Question

                Gilman.

                • Epsilonicus

                  I attended St Ignatius. Did Friends for HS

                  • Question

                    Friends is down the street right?

                    • Epsilonicus

                      It’s literally shares a backyard with Gilman.

                    • Question

                      We’ve got Friends homies in the neighborhood (surprisingly there’s a strong Baltimore contingent in our little neck of the woods) but this def not the forum for “do you know…”.

    • Nametaken
    • josh gibson

      A little late to the party, but others are right. This has not always been him. My eldest is a doctor, because of this man. As my son put it, he was so inspirational before he went insane. My son attended a Ben Carson Academy when he was in middle school and never looked back. I heard Dr. Carson speak a few years ago and he was amazing-humble, thoughtful and very compassionate. I stood in line to get his autograph and I don’t do autographs, for my son. The white people who surrounded him really didn’t want me to talk to him, but when I told him mine was in med school in part due to his inspiration his grin almost broke his face and he shook my hand extra hard.

      I hate he turned out like this. I can’t think of any good reason why. I do know this. White people didn’t hate him, they co-opted him. I been watching this happen all my life and I been around for a minute. Think Michael Jordan or Tiger Woods. This is how they reacted to Ben Carson that Sunday a few years back when I saw him give the King Day address at the school where I taught at the time. Like he was an honorary white person. Maybe somebody can come up with a vaccine.

  • Tam

    In his 2012 book “America the Beautiful,” he made the same point: “Long before the Statue of Liberty landed in America, however, other immigrants came here in the bottom of slave ships who worked even harder for no wages, but they too had a dream that one day their great-grandsons and great-granddaughters might pursue freedom and prosperity in this land.”

    http://www.politico.com/story/2017/03/ben-carson-immigrants-slaves-235771

    The problem with very smart people they tend to be deficient in some areas or after a while their smartness turns them stupid

    • Val

      Ah, so his mea culpa yesterday was just BS. He meant what he originally said in the speech.

      • Tam

        Exactly.

      • Alessandro De Medici

        Yeah if you listened to the whole speech, you could tell.

        There was no pandering whatsoever, he said it as easily as saying 1+1 = 2.

        • Mr. Mooggyy

          It was almost amazing wasn’t it!? Not a pause whatsoever!

          • Alessandro De Medici

            That’s what makes his c00ning more pronounce. Unlike David Clarke who c00ns for airtime, Ben Carson almost doesn’t know how not to c00n.

            • “M”

              This makes … WAY too much sense, unfortunately.

            • Overtymem Usicradio

              I really hope that you are wrong, but you are probably right.

        • assman35

          Obama made exactly the same comparison:
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zH91wZppWb4

          Bad anyways there is no need to “compare” the slave trade to immigration. The importation of slaves into the US was immigration. PERIOD. Unless of course you believe slaves are not people. The movement of people from one country to another is immigration for any reason whatsoever: war, trafficking, whatever. That is the definition of immigrant.

          In exactly the same manner 1+1=2 by definition of 1, 2 and +.

          • The_LG

            Appeals to semantics and any subsequent Merriam-Webster posts about “immigration” aside, the key here is context. What was said by Ben Carson was nothing less than erasure. The re-writing of a historical event in a way that is less grotesque, visceral and true in exchange for a White ideal that is more pleasantly palatable and forgiving. Arguing for the pure sake of definition means that either you agree with what he was trying to say (in which case, you are in fact complicit with an act of genocide) or you are missing the point completely, and I’m not sure what’s worse.

  • A few scary thoughts on Ben:

    Could this happen to the resto of us. Surely I’ve seen some people age and turn to the dark side. How do we prevent this coldness from infecting others?

    2) Should we have know when Cuba Gooding Jr. played him in a movie?

    3) Where is his wife? Cookie should eat blame for some of this mess.

    • Tam
      • we’re all capable.

        as the villian said in “The Killing Joke”….

        all it takes is one bad day.

        • Tam

          Not I , I may be “evil” but not like that

          • i like the think the same thing.

            when i was younger, i was probably way more…ahh…”revolutionary” compared to my present self. i’m way more pragmatic now, and seeing my father (who i’m quite sure still watches fox news from time to time) whos to say i dont take that same path?

            who’s to say you won’t become more conservative as you get older and become ‘evil’ to the youth?

            that being said, as a history major, what Sec. Carson said was probably foolishness and i wouldn’t co-sign it

            • Tam

              I think I am moving the opposite direction

            • Val

              “…was probably foolishness…”

              Probably?

              To your other point; yep, people tend to get more conservative as they get older. But Carson is beyond conservative.

            • La Bandita

              You need a new revolutionary outfit to get you back on track..

              • i quite like my current outfit

      • Something had to happen to him. He’s from Detroit. That’s not how the D is.

      • Mr. Mooggyy

        Never underestimate a ni99a desperate for acceptance!

    • Brown Rose

      The Carson are fundamental Adventists. Women are strictly in the background–so his wife is complicit in his beliefs and may even mirror them. Compare their marriage to the Obama’s in which you see an active partnership.

      Black people turning on Black people is as old as the hills. Its why we use the word C*on and Tom.

      • BlackMamba

        Crabs in a bucket.

    • Mary Burrell

      I thought Carson’s wife was named Candy.

  • Mary Burrell

    “All skin folk ain’t kinfolk “

    • truthseeker2436577@yahoo.com

      Amen Sister.

  • Kelsey

    Brilliant and beautiful.

  • Peter

    Beautiful.

  • Glo

    For the life of me, I can’t figure out what issue Disqus had with this comment:

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9d3ce4773dc72bcd737cedbaec9a990b0bedf7bac0927067cba72ba8a18a6072.png

    • Tam

      He’II is what did you in

      • Glo

        But I can say fucking? Disqus is so weird.

        • Kas loves Jamaican Breakfast

          Indeed

      • miss t-lee

        Yup. It gets me every time.

    • BrothasKeeper

      You didn’t capitalize Black.

      • Tam

        Hey sweetie.

        • BrothasKeeper

          Hey, Tambourine!

          • Tam

            You ready for the weekend?

            • BrothasKeeper

              As ready as I’ll ever be! Mrs. BK is taking me to the rodeo, and then to the shoe model establishment.

              • Tam

                Eh heh. Yee Haw. I remember the pics you posted

              • Mochasister

                Is it the Bill Pickett rodeo?

                • BrothasKeeper

                  Houston Rodeo, Carnival, and Livestock Show.

      • Lol, you’re good.

    • Alessandro De Medici

      This is why –>

      He + ‘ + ll

      That’s what gets you all the time lol.

  • NonyaB?

    Great post.

    The first time I heard of this cretin during US election, I looked him up and noted amongst other things, his # of malpractice lawsuits exceeded his industry standard. So, maybe he was gifted once but it wore down quick and his rot has been a long time coming. Booksmart was never equal to street smart. Between his “Obamacare is worse thing since slavery” and slaves were immigrants bullsh*t, I gotta say, if I walked by and Ben SelfLobotomy Carson being drawn and quartered, I wouldn’t stand in the way.

    • I_AmU

      SAVAGE…..I likes

      • NonyaB?

        Gotta keep 2017 cøøn free!

    • Mr. Mooggyy

      I thought we traded Ben a long time ago….

      Wasn’t a group deal with Stacey Dash and someone else? 2 for one special on c00ns!

      • Tam

        So what did we get in return

        • Mr. Mooggyy

          I think they tried with Gary Owen, but we said naw! It was either Michael Rapaport or a liter of fine Brown Liquor and a Wu-Tang album! But my mind is a bit blurry at this point!

        • cedriclathan

          He11, I’d take Rachel Dolozel at this point.

          • Sweet Ga Brown

            Point. Well she has stayed true to how she identifies herself…
            Wait!
            Nah.

        • BlackSnake

          I think we got Jon B.

    • Doreen Gaffney Barr

      Is every black person who befriends any white person an Uncle Tom? I hate that term. What makes someone an Uncle Tom? I would seriously like to know. I get angry when I read that.
      And as far as the #of malpractice suits, perhaps he had a higher number because of his superior knowledge and skills kind of forced him or drove him to operate on the sickest of the sick. The ones that no other Dr would take a chance on. There would always be a higher percentage of bad turnouts in that group. The best physicians treat the sickest patients.

More Like This