Dating, Relationships, & Sex, Pop Culture, Race & Politics, Theory & Essay

The Ho’s Uniform: How Ines Sainz Proves “Victim-Blaming” Isn’t Always a Bad Thing

Tuesday night, I met several friends at William Penn Tavern–a popular Pittsburgh-area sports bar—for their weekly 30 cent wing special. While there, game two of the WNBA Finals happened to showing on the flat screen directly above our table. After making a few perfunctory jokes about the uniforms–Bing is written on Seattle’s jerseys instead of Seattle. No, Seriously. –and the Seattle Storm reserve who bared a slight resemblance to Justin Bieber, the topic shifted to what the WNBA could do to make itself more popular. Although everything from tighter uniforms to a 9 foot rim–so more players could dunk–was suggested¹, we all kept coming back to the same answer: Nothing

Now, this is no indictment on the WNBA. This league contains some of the most skilled and best conditioned athletes (male or female) on the planet, and the playoff games are just as intense and hard-fought as the NBA’s. But, sports culture–the players, the fans, the mythology–is decidedly and intentionally chauvinistic to the point of misogyny¹, and one of the bi products of this dynamic is the fact that, aside from a few exceptions, casual and diehard sports fans (male and female) are just not that into the idea of watching women playing sports.

This brings us to Ines Sainz.

Sainz, a reporter for Mexican television station TV Azteca, was reportedly sexually harrassed by members (players and staff) of the New York Jets last weekend. While the allegations aren’t especially vicious–she was apparently catcalled and whistled at a few times while attempting to interview Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez–I can understand how she might have felt objectified, disrespected, and even scared.

But, from her own words (read the tweets below), she was also dressed like this when at the Jets facility:

For the past few days, I’ve been trying to find a way to craft my thoughts about this situation in the most objective, politically correct and inoffensive way possible. I asked my girlfriend and a few of her friends for their take on this situation. I asked myself how I’d feel if Sainz was my daughter or wife. I even cited her possible cultural naivety–maybe she’s just not aware of how provocative her clothing is.

But, I’m also sure she has at least a peripheral understanding of the dynamics involved with sports culture, and I’m certain she’s aware that of all the major American sports, football is widely considered the most hypermasculine. And, when you enter that culture on their territory with an outfit explicitly suggesting your tits and ass are the only parts of you meant to be taken seriously, it shouldn’t be a big surprise when your tits and ass are the only parts of you taken seriously.

With this in mind, I can’t help but think she just got what she was asking for.

I realize the danger of that statement. Hospitals, court rooms, college dormitories, and graves around the world are filled with rape victims whose perpetrators would have said the exact same thing. For some sexual predators (and enablers), all a woman needs to do to “ask for it” is be born.

But, I think we’ve become so PC on the side of  “a victim is always just a victim” that we’re reluctant to admit that victim-blaming isn’t always a wrong concept. This wasn’t a curvy woman getting harassed while walking to work or even a drunk college girl who was taken advantage of at a frat house. No, she’s a grown and perfectly lucid woman who made the conscious decision to dress in a provocative manner while at one of the most male-dominated, hyper-hetero places of business in the country.

If I get beat up, stabbed, or shot while walking through a known Crip area at night with a Chicago Bulls jersey and two red bandannas around my neck, sure the criminals need to be caught and brought to justice, but that sh*ts on me too. Did I deserve to get assaulted? No. Was my intentionally reckless behavior a major contributor to said assault? Yes. Admitting your personal culpability doesn’t absolve the perpetrators of any blame.

You know, the more I think of Sainz’s situation, the more I think this really had little to do with sex. Or, more specifically, it had little to do with her gender. Type-A, alpha male type of men–the type of men found in spades on NFL rosters and staffs–regularly intimidate, ridicule, mock, taunt, and sexually humiliate other men as a way to assert their status (they wouldn’t be alpha males if they didn’t do this), so it’s no surprise they’d treat an outsider, an outsider with attire suggesting they’re weak, whimsical, and irrelevant, that way. Trust me, they would have been just as quick to tease and taunt an inappropriately dressed man, and they probably would have been even meaner.

Through all of this, I’m not suggesting Sainz’s harassment should be ignored. I’ve shared my feelings about the ills of NFL culture before, and whoever’s responsible for this incident needs to be punished and even suspended. But, there are many other attractive female reporters in NFL locker rooms, women treated with respect and courtesy because they dress and act in a serious manner. And, if Sainz wants to treated professionally, she should probably stop dressing like she belongs to the world’s oldest profession³.

¹There were men and women at this table, btw.
²Sure, most of us would encourage our daughters to join sports teams and be active at a young age, but once you remove that personal connection, the fact reminds that aside from maybe hip-hop, there’s no other major industry that cultivates latent sexism the way sports culture does. The WNBA will always struggle to gain traction with the much coveted 21 to 35 year old diehard single male and 21 to 35 year old casual single female consumer because the things we associate with top athletes—hyper-aggression, cold-bloodedness, feats of physical prowess—are the complete antithesis of what most of us have been socialized to associate with femininity. Also, diehard sports fandom is largely driven by  sexual vicariousness. Basically, while a base part of most diehard male fans wants to be Kevin Garnett and Peyton Manning, a base part of most diehard female sports fans wants to be with them, and I don’t think that same dynamic applies to top female athletes.
³For the record, I know saying she’s dressed like a “ho” is a pretty excessive, but I just thought titling it with the Chappelle line and ending it with the “professional/world’s oldest profession” play on words was cool. #contrivedbutstillcoolwritingdevices

—The Champ

Filed Under:
Damon Young

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB. He is also a contributing editor for EBONY.com. He resides in Pittsburgh, and he really likes pancakes.

  • http://testorshia.blogspot.com JustCallMeTes

    I’m reminded of Dave Chappelle…
    “Just because I am dressed this way does not make me a whore….Just because I am dressed this way does not make me a police officer.” It’s all about presentation in my opinion. If she wanted to be taken seriously, she would’ve dressed…well…more serious.
    Most ladies I know only go out in jeans that tight for one of two things.
    1) “I still got it!”
    2) “See girls, I told ya’ll these jeans still fit!”

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      “Most ladies I know only go out in jeans that tight for one of two things.
      1) “I still got it!”
      2) “See girls, I told ya’ll these jeans still fit!””

      would #3 be “they’re attending a camel toe contest”?

      • http://testorshia.blogspot.com JustCallMeTes

        Because nothing is more appealing than seeing a woman pull out a camel toe repeatedly and winning a prize for it

      • mssmtaylor

        “would #3 be “they’re attending a camel toe contest”?”

        I just fell on the floor!

    • jamesjones

      Cause she is def “wearing a whores uniform…”

  • VSB Lurker

    Hmmm…I believe this is one of the first times I disagree with The Champ…

    • http://testorshia.blogspot.com JustCallMeTes

      If you don’t mind my asking, what is it you disagree with?

    • http://thecochranfirm.wordpress.com/2010/08/05/what-are-you-doing-here-last-fm/ Dasher of The Newport Dashers

      Well mami is not a real journalist. According Jamelle Hill, she is a journalist/model who’s past behavior and stories are generally about sexual objectification of herself and the players. Once a switch is flipped where people a person conditions people to not take them seriously, it is difficult to have that switch flipped back into the opposite direction.

      • Omar

        Honestly, Spanish television is notorious for this type of thing most of their shows especially sports (google: republica deportiva) shows feature some sort of scantily dressed women, often showing cleavage, so to a certain extent this is kind of culture clash.

        However with that said it is unintelligent to go into a football team’s locker room dressed like that, it is like walking into a frat house bathroom with guys in there wearing skimpy clothes and expecting no one to try you.

    • Sula

      Me too.

      I so totally and fundamentally disagree that I would have to actually write a post to disagree… I’m lazy though.

      • TH

        I disagree, too. I’m tired (so very tired) of everything being blamed on the woman. Why can’t we actually expect men to act like ADULTS and not whoot and holler? Why is it HER fault for wearing those outfits? I’m not saying I agree with her decision to don those clothes (her ass is pretty fabulous, though-no lie) just that it’s so often our society expecting women to know better instead of asking me TO ACT BETTER! They shouldn’t be given a pass on behaving themselves just because they get paid millions of dollars to throw a ball around. C’mon, Champ. We can agree to disagree but I expected you to be a whole helluva lot more open-minded about this.

        • TH

          I mean “asking MEN to know better”. iPhone fail.

    • Divine

      So, I disagree with Champ too, but here’s why.

      #1 – I think this is simply a big culture clash. I don’t know how many nights I’ve flipped through Telemundo and stopped because the chick doing the news was absolutely beautiful and very scantily clad. And I’m a woman! But Latino cultures embrace their sexuality in all forms of media.

      #2 – Ines was not the one who filed the sexual harrassment claim. She just continued to do her job. It was another woman who overheard the catcalls that filed the claim. My thing is, let me file if it’s offensive to me. Don’t bring me into no big PR campaign about me cause your panties are in a bunch. If you’re offended, you handle it on your terms and don’t drag me into it.

      #3 – She never disparaged the team or the management for this unfortunate incident. She’s proud of her work, proud of her outfit and happy to covering football. She wants to keep doing that. She’s not asking for money. She’s not seeking the publicity. This was all thrust on her. I think she’s doing a great job handling the situation.

      That’s my two cents. Back to lurking…

      • http://tdhurst.com Tyler Hurst

        Not to take this TOO far, but are you alleging that she is Monica Lewinsky to the suit filer’s Linda Tripp?

        If this is true, and no, I’m not accusing Saint of pulling a Lewinsky, but shouldn’t she denounce the suit if she disagrees with it?

        • Divine

          Interesting analogy. I do think it’s a little Monica/Linda Tripp-ish. I think the issue is that she won’t denounce someone else if they felt harassed. She’s simply vocal that she never personally felt harassed.

  • http://twitter.com/eazylittle Eazy

    Very well said sir. I haven’t kept up with the intricate details of the issue, but I wonder what’s her rationale for dressing er…….a bit more provocatively than the typical reporter? What does she expect?

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      the more i think about it, the more i think it’s a cultural thing. but, if she’s a professional, she should have done her research and learned certain things don’t fly the same way here.

      • Toch_L

        I agree with you champ that its a cultural thing. Have you watched some of the spanish channels news or other programming? Many of the females anchors, commentators (20 to early 30s) all dress like that Ho-ish uniform

        • miss t-lee

          Yeah they’re off the chain on Telemundo and Univision. It’s been like 7 in the morning and I’ve seen newscasters on there wearing tube dresses and 5 inch heels. I’m like “this is the news?” LMAO I chalk this whole case up to cultural differences. Ms.Sainz obviously didn’t see anything with her outfit since that’s the norm for her culture. She’s a brave chick, ain’t no way I woulda worn anything remotely close to that knowing I’d be in a locker room full of dudes.

          • MImi

            If I was in Ms. Sainz shoes, I would’ve worn a burka, a pair of Ugg Boots and a hockey mask would’ve been covering my face.

            • V Renee

              The image is cracking me up. I would have never thought to put a burka with Uggs. LOL

              • Mimi

                And I wouldn’t even shake their hands either.
                With some of these athletes, I think a woman can get pregnant through a simple handshake.
                You can go into a football locker room to interview a few players, but end up leaving an hour later, in your second trimester.

              • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

                The image is cracking me up. I would have never thought to put a burka with Uggs. LOL

                i’ve seen a burka and patent leather jordans before, so anything is possible

          • http://www.twitter.com/sweetchicgeek Sweet Chic Geek

            This right here.

            Every situation deserves to be looked through thoroughly, but blame puts the onus entirely on the person in question – which in the case of a victim isn’t right.

            It doesn’t sound like Sainz feels she’s a victim, which I suppose is the most important thing – but the general response is very disheartening.

    • whykendra

      i think everyone is missing the point. by suggesting that the way she dressed provoked…whatever. its promoting the whole “boys will be boys thing”. if thats her body then she shouldnt have to wear a potato sack just so the excitable 13 year old boys (i mean grown men…i mean…whatever, same thing) aren’t overwhelmed. certain things are unprofessional (like those tight ass jeans) but that changes nothing for me, she should deserves the same amount of respect as a woman in a snow suit. i dress conservatively because im afraid of getting the wrong kind of attention. but my fear isnt justifying another woman being harrassed if she does. my fear and this situation as a whole is just one of many examples of how women are constantly constricted by ridiculous ideologies, and then criticized after the fact for ‘reckless behavior’.

  • Malia

    When I first, first, saw this story, and saw the photo without the headline, I thought she was a cheerleader. Not a journalist.

    • YAYER

      me too, lol!

      :)

  • Charisse

    I’ve never commented before have always read. I do want to say, Champ, I’m not sure if you saw this morning or if it aired in your area. However, Inez was on the Channel 5 Morning News for New York and she indicated that she knew that her clothes were provocative and that she can not help it that she is sexy and she is not going to make herself ugly to get her work done. Also, that the players should just do their jobs as she is doing her regardless if she is sexy. In the end, I agree with you, she kind of asked for it period! And the ridicule of Clinton Portis is stupid. She walked into a locker room of naked men, knowing she was “sexy” so ….

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      i haven’t heard her voice yet. my knowledge of this situation has been all through internet articles. but, if that’s what she said, i think she’s missing the difference between dressing “ugly” and dressing appropriately. you can still be sexy with a pants suit that doesnt look to be painted on

      • Yeah…So

        “she knew that her clothes were provocative and that she can not help it that she is sexy and she is not going to make herself ugly to get her work done.”

        “she’s missing the difference between dressing “ugly” and dressing appropriately. you can still be sexy with a pants suit that doesnt look to be painted on”

        Clearly her priorities are in the wrong place as well. When I get ready for work I’m not thinking “well, I’m sexy (and BOY am I ever) so I’m NOT gonna hide it”… No, I’m thinking “well, sh!t I got about 4 meetings today so that means I’m gon’ be running all over… flats it is!”

    • Mimi

      “…Inez was on the Channel 5 Morning News for New York and she indicated that she knew that her clothes were provocative and that she can not help it that she is sexy and she is not going to make herself ugly to get her work done…”

      This is the kind of stuff that I cannot stand about SOME (not all) women.
      Besides, I refuse to believe that she was sexually harrassment, unless she has some concrete evidence. If she said that catcalls were the only thing that she experienced, then I don’t think it was horrific. I have been sexually harrassed before (in the past and I’m sure there are plenty VSS who experience it as well) and if I had to pick the lesser of two evils (catcalling or the groping), I settle for the ‘hey ma, you got a phat a$$’.

      • Dom

        If she said that catcalls were the only thing that she experienced, then I don’t think it was horrific.

        Exactly. Like, what do you expect when you’re walking in to a locker room full of men, all hyped up from ramming into eachother at top speeds for three hours? Take the catcalls and whistles and move your a__ out the way.

        • Mimi

          Which is why I believe she (or her managers) is more offended that these Americans (both black and white) are speaking about her in such fashion.

  • OftenConfused

    i’m trying to be objective, but for right now I disagree. Using your example…while it may not be smart to walk around in all red in a crip area, you definitely don’t DESERVE to be shot, beat up, etc… Was it stupid? yes! do you deserve to die because of your mistake/ignorance? NO!

    ….maybe i need to sleep on it.

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      Was it stupid? yes! do you deserve to die because of your mistake/ignorance? NO!

      i agree with this, and in no way did i suggest she deserved what happened. but, she should shoulder a part of the blame

    • http://www.pinchmycheekie.wordpress.com Cheekie

      Ain’t that exactly what Champ said?

      “If I get beat up, stabbed, or shot while walking through a known Crip area at night with a Chicago Bulls jersey and two red bandannas around my neck, sure the criminals need to be caught and brought to justice, but that sh*ts on me too. Did I deserve to get assaulted? No. Was my intentionally reckless behavior a major contributor to said assault? Yes. Admitting your personal culpability doesn’t absolve the perpetrators of any blame.”

      I know Champ is an edit-freak with his writing, but I have to actually give props to him for putting it the way he did. I think that’s the mistake folks make when they automatically get up in arms when you mention how someone should’ve made a smarter decision in a situation like this. They automatically assume you mean they “deserve” it, and the perpetrator is completely let off the hook. Which, no, it’s just not that black and white. Little in life ever is…

      • V Rene

        They automatically assume you mean they “deserve” it, and the perpetrator is completely let off the hook. Which, no, it’s just not that black and white. .

        Yup!

        Just like I wouldn’t go into a prison group with a bunch of inmates who haven’t smelled poo-nanny in years, wearing a short tight skirt and halter. Instead, I wouldn’t shower for days, leave my hair uncombed and slap on the burka that Mimi mentioned upthread and then maybe enter the lion’s den. LOL

      • http://thatswhatgemsaid.blogspot.com Gem of the Ocean

        @Cheekie

        “Ain’t that exactly what Champ said?”

        lmao i HATE when ppl dont read!!!! esp on VEE ESS BEE–home of the very smart folk. reading is fundamental, yall.

        • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

          LOL, to her credit, she probably posted that comment before I made my final edit. maybe the part about “not deserving” hadn’t made it in there yet

          • http://www.pinchmycheekie.wordpress.com Cheekie

            Oh, okay I kinda thought that, but wasn’t sure since she mentioned the Crip example specificaly. But you edited within that example. Editing a*s.

          • Oftenconfused

            Thank you champ…I posted this at 12:14. I dont recall that portion. If it was there hey it was late and I could have skimmed by it.

            In either case I will change the first line from “i’m trying to be objective, but for right now I disagree” to “i’m trying to be objective, AND I AGREE THE BLAME CAN BE SPLIT BETWEEN THE TWO PARTIES”. The rest of my comment can remain unchanged…BETTER?!

  • Charisse

    I’m not sure if you saw this morning or if it aired in your area. However, Inez was on the Channel 5 Morning News for New York and she indicated that she knew that her clothes were provocative and that she can not help it that she is sexy and she is not going to make herself ugly to get her work done. Also, that the players should just do their jobs as she is doing her regardless if she is sexy. In the end, I agree with you, she kind of asked for it period! And the ridicule of Clinton Portis is stupid. She walked into a locker room of naked men, knowing she was “sexy” so ….

    • Neila

      So they should act like they have a damn brain and act appropriately until she leaves. Is it really asking too much that dudes just shut the hell up and be happy that they get to see an ass instead of it being hidden under a burkha?

      Do you really think they would have found her less attractive in a nice tailored suit? I doubt it. Her ass couldn’t be hidden unless it was under a tent.

      • Sula

        So they should act like they have a damn brain and act appropriately until she leaves

        I mean seriously!

  • Sasi Quaia

    I most certainly agree with the matter! She should’ve dressed the part, what the heck did she think would happen. Not gay, but she got a “black girl booty” in those jeans and surely that would get the attention that she prolly wasn’t looking for. She was a slab of ribs in the lions den! Just what was she thinking?

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      thats the thing: i dont think she has a particularly big butt. she’s curvy with a tiny waist, but she’s wearing the type of jeans that are intentionally cut to announce every single one of you assets

      • http://www.divinetranquility.wordpress.com Miss Patterson

        “i dont think she has a particularly big butt.”
        say what?

        it’s pretty d@mn round.

        • http://uphereoncloud9.wordpress.com/ Wu Young Agent of M.E.

          She does have nice behind for realz. It should have been in a pants suit but it is nice.

      • JessicaL

        Watchumean, her butt isn’t big? It looks like her booty is eating her pants.

  • hehe

    I don’t agree. This is another example of men trying to control the behavior of women. Was it wise for her to dress that way if she wanted to be taken seriously as a reporter? No. But why is it our first reaction as a society is to make sure that she change her behavior instead of the men being respectful and not being disrespectful and chauvinistic. They knew she was a reporter when she walked in there, so There is no way you can justify their reaction.

    • oftenconfused

      ITA with this…

    • hehe

      That men will be men b.s. will not fly

    • dudette

      here here.

    • http://testorshia.blogspot.com JustCallMeTes

      I think what Champ was trying to say is not everyone who cries victimization is a victim and that at some point, personal accountability has to come into play.
      Were the men wrong for harrassing her? Of course. They are professionals and should behave professionally. But are they the only ones at fault here? I don’t think so. In a professional setting you come professionally dressed.
      I ask you, would you go into bank and apply for a job dressed as she dressed? And if you did get the job dressed that way, wouldn’t you question your employer’s motives just a bit?

    • Leila

      “why is it our first reaction as a society is to make sure that she change her behavior instead of the men being respectful and not being disrespectful and chauvinistic”

      Big co-sign! These are grown men and they know that she’s a reporter. Treat her with respect and let her do her job. I don’t think she looks like a ho at all. Even if she dressed more conservatively, it doesn’t mean the guys would treat her with respect. I know from experience that men will be men. I have curves (top and bottom) and dress conservatively at work and still deal with men and their looks/comments.

      • YAYER

        @Leila

        forgive me for saying this but it is EASIER to assert that the problem is with the men (and not you on any level) ,ya dig?

        • Leila

          True. I’m just sayin that even if she dressed down a bit, she’s still an attractive woman with a curvy body. Walking into a locker room with the football players will still get her cat calls and guys harassing her. Guys think that women dressing in tight clothes are asking for the attention, but believe me, looser clothes does not hide curves and women will still get unwanted attention.

      • Alvin

        Let us also not forget that she has toyed the line with sexual provocation with football players in the past.

        1. She allowed the Colts’ football players to carry her on their shoulders.

        2. She showed up at a practice field for the Cardinals, I believe, and held a bicep measuring contest.

        Champ should have listed these examples to present a fairer view of what took place here. This woman wasn’t some unsuspecting victim. She was compeletely aware of the environment she was entering.

    • Vacra-The Queen of Spades

      I feel like this is a blank check for men to do whatever they want. “she was dressed that way, I couldn’t help myself.” Things like this scare me and make me worry for the future of women. Our bodies are always under the control of men and we have to walk on eggshells not to excite them…..c’mon son??!! They need to show some decorum and act like decent people.

      This seriously pisses me off.

      • Eric

        And what control is your body under? Seriously, miss me with that crap. Men aren’t controlling women and the way they dress. You’re a grown woman and you know what’s considered provocative and sexy. Stop crying wolf just because you got some attention. If men ignored women when they dress provocative then you’ll rant about that too.

      • Mo (VSS)

        THIS^^^^^^^^^^^^^

        And anyone who doesn’t agree that our (female) bodies are always under the control and scrunity of men, then think of all the legislation on abortion. Hell, even the STATE wants to tell me what I can and cannot do with my body. While a man can rape a woman/child and do some time in prison (not nearly enough) no one ever says “maybe we should enact a law that after a first rape conviction we, as a society, should consider castration.” Nope.

        Instead society is taught that we have to dress differently, behave differently and hell…even children are blamed when they are raped. Men though…there’s always the “well, that’s messed up” but no real discussion on how to gain control over their behavior by gaining control over what they can/cannot do LEGALLY with their bodies.

        Also, if you want to take it even deeper, men bodies are heralded in our society. In the medical community, there are all types of drugs and enhancements in order to preserve “manhood” (i.e. erections) and libido. But for women, what do we have?

        When men get testicular cancer, the first option is not to cut off their balls. But when women get breast cancer…that’s the first thing the medical community advocates. When women get cervical cancer, the first line of defense is to advocate a hysterectomy. Why? We don’t have any comparable situations that men have to go through regarding their bodies and what is considerd the essence of them. But, as women we are often reduced to body parts, and that’s in large part to how MEN view us….men in the medical community, men in society, men in the church, etc.

        So, for anyone who thinks women’s bodies aren’t a subject of control, be it conscious or unconscious, needs only to sit down with a woman and ask what her experience has been in this regard.

        Now…this woman in question didn’t have on anything that was inappropriate. She had on jeans and a shirt. Tight? Yeah, but she’s been doing this for 9 years and never had this type of issue before. Also, I’m sure she could have walked in wearing a 3 piece suit and some dude would have said something. So, while she “could” dress differently, it’s not as if she walked up in there wearing a halter dress and 5 inch clear heels.

        So, ho’s uniform? Hardly! You missed the mark on that one Champ.

        • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

          “Now…this woman in question didn’t have on anything that was inappropriate.”

          the fact that you’re able to put coherent sentences together tells me you don’t really believe that statement. there’s no way in hell you can be obviously intelligent and still feel she was dressed in an inappropriate manner. none.

          it feels like your argument is based more on “anti-oppressive” principle instead of common sense

          • Mo (VSS)

            Champ, she didn’t have on anything inappropriate. Albeit, her cleavage was out and her jeans were tight. And, I’ll admit…it wouldn’t be my first choice of clothing for the men’s locker room interview. But honestly, what she wore was dressed down for the type of stuff I’ve seen of her via pictures.

            That’s my opinion. And what I wrote upthread was directed at those who don’t think women’s bodies are always in a constant state of “control” by the masses. It is and because you chose not to address it, I’m sure you know in some respect it’s true.

            • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

              And what I wrote upthread was directed at those who don’t think women’s bodies are always in a constant state of “control” by the masses. It is and because you chose not to address it, I’m sure you know in some respect it’s true.

              i didn’t comment on it because i dont think it’s really applicable in this situation. plus, your statements aren’t leaving any room for nuance or gray. is it true that women are routinely objectified? Yes. Is it true that in this particular instance, this particular woman dressed in a manner that was inappropriate for her occupation and the setting? Yes

        • http://www.pinchmycheekie.wordpress.com Cheekie

          “And anyone who doesn’t agree that our (female) bodies are always under the control and scrunity of men, then think of all the legislation on abortion. Hell, even the STATE wants to tell me what I can and cannot do with my body.”

          I think everything has a consequence. Every action has a reaction. It’s like, if you go to work with a skirt that barely grazes your cooch to corporate america, best believe you’re getting written up at the very least. As for her, no one is telling her what to do with her body. They’re telling her what to expect when she wears certain things. Doesn’t mean these guys have a right to do anything to her, because like I said, every action has a consequence. If they touch her inappropriately or continually harrass her in a way that is legally inappropriate, she can then take legal action. There’s this thing called a line, and if they cross it, it’s on them.

          “Also, if you want to take it even deeper, men bodies are heralded in our society. In the medical community, there are all types of drugs and enhancements in order to preserve “manhood” (i.e. erections) and libido. But for women, what do we have? ”

          If anything, this reminds me of breast implants. That, because what you have naturally isn’t good enough, you have to resort to outside measures to improve it. Nothing about peen enhancements scream “herald man parts” to me…it is the same superficial theme that influences people to tell chicks to get bigger boobs.

          But, I agree with you that it ain’t a ho’s uniform by any means. Maybe that was exaggeration on Champ’s part…maybe purposely.

        • Eric

          “When men get testicular cancer, the first option is not to cut off their balls. But when women get breast cancer…that’s the first thing the medical community advocates. When women get cervical cancer, the first line of defense is to advocate a hysterectomy. Why?”

          When you say things like this it really detracts from any credibility you may have. When a man is diagnosed with testicle cancer, the first thing they do is remove the cancerous testicle. Now, he can choose to only have the part that is cancerous remain but it’s very risky because the rest of the testicle may become cancerous AND spread.

          Again I say, miss me with that BS.

          • MzPW

            Y’know bro….I gotta say, I ‘kinda” agree with you about the whole “miss me with that b.s.” response and all, but I can’t help but to wonder….when will the attention from the whole issue of harrassment be turned towards the men? In other words, I think it’s safe to say that Ms Sainz had some type of understanding of what’s appropriate and what’s not, cultural differences aside. However, does her clothing choice really make it okay for the fellas to respond the way they did, simply because they are men?

            Maybe that’s the whole question of the issue. I don’t think anyone is debating that the way one carries themself will ultimately have an impact on how others will respond, but WHY is it okay and “to be expected” for men to act like jackasses when a woman is in their presence, dressed in a certain way?

        • CudanJ

          “When men get testicular cancer, the first option is not to cut off their balls. But when women get breast cancer…that’s the first thing the medical community advocates. When women get cervical cancer, the first line of defense is to advocate a hysterectomy. Why?”

          From a scientific standpoint, you should WANT to have your breast removed if there’s a history of breast cancer in your family. This has NOTHING to do with controlling women’s bodies.
          Leaving even a small portion of that tumor will more than likely cause those cells to grow back.

          So…women should keep their carcinoma infested tissue just to prove to men that they have the right to keep their body? please….

      • Sula

        “she was dressed that way, I couldn’t help myself.”

        Exactly. And it’s even scarier when you think of where this conversation is taking place… It’s truly scary.

    • JessicaL

      I agree and disagree all at the same time. You can change your behavior way faster than expecting a locker room full of guys to change theirs. It may be a cultural thing but would you show up to work looking like that? I have seen plenty of adorable pant or skirt suits that can still be sexy and professionally at the same time.

      • V Renee

        I agree and disagree all at the same time .

        I’m with you. I agree and disagree……

        Let’s not forget she WAS in a locker room where naked men run around. If I were the men, I may feel slightly violated. You’re a person of the opposite sex in the room where I shower, change and walk around with my pe.nis swaying around. I dunno……

        Why are interviews conducted in the locker room anyway?!?!

        • Dom

          Why are interviews conducted in the locker room anyway?!?!

          Yes! This is exactly what I said down thread. I dont think women should be allowed in there period. Conduct your interview outside and let the men have some privacy.

          • http://tiffanybbrown.com/ tiffany

            “I dont think women should be allowed in there period. Conduct your interview outside and let the men have some privacy.”

            replace “women” with “reporters,” and you might have a point.

        • http://www.pinchmycheekie.wordpress.com Cheekie

          “Why are interviews conducted in the locker room anyway?!?!”

          Best question evah. It’s like “welcome to the lion’s den” and “oh yeah…act professional” o_O

        • http://twitter.com/olivya23 olivya23

          Men nor women of the media should be allowed in the locker room. This is why they have media rooms, where you can conduct the interviews and ask questions. Every sports team needs to invest in a media room if they haven’t already and ban the media from the locker room. Period.

      • James

        That’s just it. She wasn’t sexy or professional. She is just trashy. Her only talent is flaunting her body. This is all about publicity. It’s well planned. Why leak a sex tape when you can show up to work like it’s freaknik and get a week’s worth of national media coverage by claiming you were uncomfortable. Jeans aren’t supposed to go ALL the way up your crack. Open a VS catalog and even those size 0 and size 2 models appear more modest in skin tight jeans. She is talentless, but smart enough to know how far the “white woman down” syndrome can get her. This is something every woman deals with every second of every day. Every woman on here knows how to walk into that situation and get respect. The idea that latin woman/entertainers are just so naturally sexy that they just don’t know what it does to regular people is a joke. She has a publicist, a manager, a stylist a producer all telling her to play this up so her sexuallity can BE the story instead of what she is while she’s reporting the story. Because the Jets are not a story. They suck. If she was interviewing TO and commented on his abs, would that be harrasment.

        • Dom

          @ James

          Spot on.

    • noladarling

      AMEN!!!

    • http://kamakula.wordpress.com kamakula

      I can answer why the first reaction is that she should change her behavior. There is a greater expectation of professionalism on her part. For example, even though we have certain expectation of children and their behavior with adults, we know that when playing games, they will play and joke and sometimes get out of hand. We have different expectations for the gym teacher. We don’t allow him or her that kind of leeway.

      If you look up photos and stories she’s done with players, there is a lot of her measuring people’s biceps, sitting on shoulders, pretty much engaging in behavior that walks the line between being a professional reporter and a professional bartender. And you can bet that all the guys have been playing back.

      Sure, it takes two to tango, but she helped generate a working environment where people relaxed the standards of professionalism around her. And so, like it happens every friday night, somebody or bodies crossed the line for her.

      Example: You are a male in an exclusive relationship. You have a female friend who is interested in you. You continue to spend time with this friend, allow her to touch you, playfully feel you up, sit on your lap. Perhaps all of these excursions never happen for more than a second. She was only seeing how “strong” you were. She was commenting on your shirt and had to touch you to do it. Then one day, in all that playing, she gives you a kiss. And suddenly you want to put 100% of the blame on her? No. Like it or not, you are to blame. And like it or not, you bear more of the responsibility in this situation. You are the one who is supposed to be in an exclusive relationship, not your friend. Regardless of what you may think of people’s behavior or someone outside of a relationship respecting the boundaries, it is the people in the relationship who have the most responsibility for keeping stuff like that from happening.

      • Ivy St.

        You are one smart brotha!

    • Chris

      All of these “let’s have these men be more respectful,” and “death to chauvinism” comments are a crock of shit for this situation. If we want to talk about the players being more professional, let’s hold everyone else to the same professional standards.

      This means she would get reprimanded for wearing unprofessional attire that can cause unnecessary distractions and more importantly this means the men would be afforded the privacy in the locker room. They’re not in the WNBA locker rooms doing post-game interviews and I thank them for that because I’m not exactly waiting for the Diana Taurasi sextape to leak. Who here works at a place where theyre ass naked, but have to remain professional?…so no strippers read this blog?

      I’m pretty much saying we can’t hold these men to a standard while not holding everyone else to that standard.

      • chris

        p.s. I want to be able to wear my earrings and sweatpants to work and have a kneck tattoo, but society won’t let me…because it’s not professional. How dare society for wanting to treat me like a nigguh if I came to work like that as opposed to the professional my creditionals assert me to be.

    • Eric

      Actually this is more of an example of WOMEN trying to control MEN’s behavior. And for those who say that “,men will be men” line won’t fly, we don’t need it to “fly”. It is what it is. It’s not gonna change and it ain’t going anywhere. You can live in the world thinking about how things SHOULD be or you can wake up and come deal with it the way things ARE.

    • http://thatswhatgemsaid.blogspot.com Gem of the Ocean

      @hehe

      hey knew she was a reporter when she walked in there, so There is no way you can justify their reaction.

      so you’re saying its only necessary for MEN to change their behavior?? for men to go from being naturally visually stimulated beings, who are not only amped up on testosterone but also adrenaline after a game to just IGNORE the fact that this woman has come into their cave man dwelling in tight clothes? GTFOOH.

      this and this are going to distract men. of course they should be able to act more professionally and try to control their hormones but why test the waters and tempt them?? THAT makes no sense. th

    • Alvin

      The exact opposite of what you said is true. It isn’t men attempting to control women, it is women attempting to control men. She entered a male dominated environment, was subjected to behavior typical of men in that environment, and the Association for Women in Sport’s Media raised a complaint.

      To be fair to all sides, females shouldn’t be allowed in the locker room. Football players can barely control their conduct on the field, (look at the Jets’ penalty statistics from Monday), I wouldn’t expect much restraint in the locker room.

      Perhaps she should switch over to reporting at the next Oprah show.

      • http://thatswhatgemsaid.blogspot.com Gem of the Ocean

        *standing ovation*

        say that!

        • http://thatswhatgemsaid.blogspot.com Gem of the Ocean

          but let it be known, i dont agree with the idea that women reporters shouldnt be allowed in the locker room.

          • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

            but let it be known, i dont agree with the idea that women reporters shouldnt be allowed in the locker room.

            i actually agree with you. well, put it this way, i dont think ANYONE should be allowed in there, but just saying “no women” gives a professional advantage to the male reporters, who now would have more access to players and, subsequently, better stories.

            • Alvin

              Professional advantage?

              In today’s 24 hour sports cycle of news, where every story is analyzed and then reanalyzed by hundreds of people, there is no more advantage to exclusivity in breaking a story.

              If anything, there is a disadvantage for women with Antonio Cromartie lurking around impregnating them with his mind. Now Ines Sainz has to miss 9 months of work because Cromartie winked at her.

            • V Renee

              i dont think ANYONE should be allowed in there .

              ME EITHER!!!! Why the locker room for interviews?!?!?! I don’t like people at work talking to me in the restroom. After a game, I’m sitting there taking a sh*t and a reporter runs up talmabout “What changes are you going to make to your defense next game?” I’ma be like “I think the defense should tackle yo azz and drag you out of here right now. Don’t you see me taking a sh*t?!”.

    • Omar

      This is not an absolute behavior change, just behavior in certain circumstances. A locker room is a glorified bathroom, what if at the gym a women in a sports bra and tights went into the men’s locker room, it is entirely unreasonable to not expect a reaction from someone.

      I’m all for professionalism but generally professionalism is asked for in places where penises don’t get pulled out on the regular… I’m just sayin…

    • Caballeroso

      “why is it our first reaction as a society is to make sure that she change her behavior instead of the men being respectful and not being disrespectful and chauvinistic. They knew she was a reporter when she walked in there, so There is no way you can justify their reaction.”

      I see your point, but let’s beat this horse with a different whip.

      Why is it our first reaction as a society to make sure that men change their behavior instead of the women being respectful and not parading her body in front of half-dressed perpetually horny men. She knew that men are easily distracted by sexuality when she walked in there. For all those guys knew she could have been a ho disguised as a TV reporter to get locker room access.

      • miss t-lee

        ” For all those guys knew she could have been a ho disguised as a TV reporter to get locker room access.”

        Hmmm. Interesting take.

      • Sula

        women being respectful and not parading her body

        And therein lies my problem… How is the way someone chooses to dress themselves respectful and/or disrespectful??? It could be called tasteful, it could be called unimaginative, it could be called ugly…. but disrespectful? To whom? And why?

    • Sula

      our first reaction as a society is to make sure that she change her behavior instead of the men being respectful and not being disrespectful and chauvinistic

      Bingo.

      Maybe it comes from the fact that I grew up in a place where a woman does NOT even have the choice/voice to complain about ANYTHING… whether she’s wearing a burqa or not.. Slippery slopes are real… So if a man says that a strand of her hair was so blond that it aroused him, then what? What is considered “reasonable” in these cases?

      • Yeah…So

        “So if a man says that a strand of her hair was so blond that it aroused him, then what? What is considered “reasonable” in these cases?”

        But see that’s the thing… even I’M a little put off by her attire and I don’t like chiks that way but when I say I feel like I know what this chick looks like naked I mean it, like “D@mn Ma put a towel on!”

        A blonde hair?… a little excessive and I’m sure ANY woman would stand against a claim like that. This chick right here… I can’t even do it.

    • Yeah…So

      “They knew she was a reporter when she walked in there, so There is no way you can justify their reaction.”

      Uh did they know? I myself like a couple others upthread mentioned they thought she was a cheerleader or something of that sort at first before reading the post. Yes. I agree women should be aloud to dress and express themselves how they deem fit without being objectified BUT we should also be mindful of our audiences…

      Would you say the same if instead of it being a scantally clad reporter in a NFL locker room it were a white man walking ALONE through the most drug infested projects dressed in expessive garb from head to foot. Obviously, no one SHOULD bother him… but the odds of him being left alone PUH-LEEZ. He should use common sense much like she should have.

      • Neila

        So a woman should fear for her safety when around some dudes because again men have no control over themsevles whatsoever?

        Yeah, they knew she was a reporter. Odds are they know their cheerleaders and their cheerleaders aren’t standing in the middle of the locker room with a mike in their hand or some sort of crew.

        • Neila

          I meant mic.

          I know what you mean but I think we need to swap our way of thinking. You should be able to walk down a street no matter where it is. Fix the real problem.

          • Yeah…So

            The only problems you can fix are those that you control PERIOD. And I totally get what you are saying but let’s be real… good and evil have ALWAYS been as well as right and wrong. So you know that. So what makes you so much more special than everyone else that the fundamentals of LIFE (that good AND evil exist) should bend for you because you wanna dress SEXY or walk around in the projects in your new $2,000 suit. Don’t afraid to do you but we need to use common sense. Hold people accountable yes, but use your common sense people. You mean to tell me the ONLY place she could wear that outfit was in an NFL locker room? She couldn’t find somewhere else to “feel” sexy?

            • Yeah…So

              Oh and to answer the knowing she was a reporter statement I’m just gonna repeat what my man Caballeroso said by saying…

              “For all those guys knew she could have been a ho disguised as a TV reporter to get locker room access.”

              And it does happen people… TRUST ME!

              • Neila

                Then she did a damn good job because no security personnel or player made a move to remove her so I’m pretty sure that at that point they either didn’t care or thought she was there as a legit reporter.

                Who says someone is special? No one is saying good and evil doesn’t exist. We are talking about professionals in a setting where they commonly do things pertaining to their job. Acting in a decent manner towards someone is bending? I didn’t know people were asking for a red carpet to roll out instead of asking that people not do shit like rob or hassle someone.

                I doubt that it was simply about her feeling sexy as opposed to her presenting the image that her station is comfortabel with her having. Again, look at some spanish channels and then get back to me about what is appropriate dress.

                If this were her walking down the street I would still shake my head at the dudes but we wouldn’t be talking about the NFL looking into it.

                As I said before, we are where we are now because we as humans can challenge and shape our society. In the past white men would openly call black derogatory names. In the past you could beat your wife and not get jail time. Is this one incident as bad as all of those things? Nah. Is it something that can get us started on the discussion about behavioral acceptance in interactions between the sexes. Sure.

              • Yeah…So

                @ Neila

                I get it. In some respects we are saying the same thing. We believe everyone should be able to be themselves and not be hassled for that. But, you do realize there is a give and take? While I get that the Hispanic shows tend to be more on a “liberal” dress schedule than American ones, does that mean when a Hispanic anchor comes to an American sports event to interview American players that the Hispanic customs should still apply? Is that what you’re saying? That because a Hispanic station is coming into interview your environment that you should adjust it to accommodate them? OR should they do their research afore and understand the environment in which they are embarking?

                Don’t get me wrong… I don’t think it’s appropriate for ANYONE to objectify another. I believe those players were wrong and the issue should have been addressed privately. To take it to the next level by calling it sexual harrassment all over the news and whatnot is just opportunistic and yes a great indication of her own lack of common sense. She is a woman walking into a MEN’s locker room… who is invading whose space and should plan accordingly?

  • Blackbuttafly

    I know that if *I* wore an outfit like that, I know EXACTLY the type of reaction I’m going to get. This woman knows better and should stop playing ignorant. Cat-calling may have been rude and disrespectful, but if you don’t want rude and disrespectful, then don’t put yourself in the situation. Playing innocent victim is just plain idiotic. Now, if someone had put their hands on her, that’s a different story

    • oftenconfused

      see to me if you start excusing the cat calling then the next step is a slap on the ass or a lil grab at the waist…i mean who’s to say the level of what she was “asking for”?
      i can hear it now, “well she new her ass was sticking out in the jeans…she wanted me to grab it”

      • JessicaL

        I don’t excuse any of that foolishness. I just have one question though. If you knew she were dressing in a provacative way did she really expect no reaction? She’s an attractive woman so I’m sure she’s been cat-called before and lol not gay or anything but she looks like she’s not new to male attention. Why fuel the fire simply because you can. IMO, that’s not very professional at all.

        • TrackStar

          Exactly. And I don’t buy the cultural differences mess as well. There is a time and place for everything. I am sure she was aware that the locker room was not the place for that outfit. I also agree with another commenter that the whole “sexy reporter” image is her thing. Her network and management purposely market her that way. Even the MTV VJs back in the day (LaLa, Vanessa, ect…) would wear appropriate outfits when doing sports interviews such as jeans and a jersey. That skin-tight Papaya/Wet Seal outfit was definitely chosen on purpose, and was not work place appropriate.

      • Caballeroso

        “see to me if you start excusing the cat calling then the next step is a slap on the ass or a lil grab at the waist…i mean who’s to say the level of what she was “asking for”? i can hear it now, “well she new her ass was sticking out in the jeans…she wanted me to grab it”

        Cat-calling: Freedom of speech
        A$S Slapping: Assault & Battery