Featured, Music, Pop Culture, Theory & Essay

The Hip-Hop Dalmatians Are the Greatest Rap Group That Never Was. Probably. Maybe.

As far as late-’90s and early-2000s black cinema goes, Brown Sugar is probably my favorite movie. The Wood is as close a second as you can get, much in the way thatReasonable Doubt is my favorite Jay Z album but I can listen to The Blueprint all day every day. In fact, The Wood is a movie I loved so much that I was actually sad when it ended and wished for another 15 to 30 minutes of movie. Of course, that could be because I had the pleasure of watching it with the black community at Magic Johnson’s theater in Atlanta’s Greenbriar neighborhood, which means that the experience was just as entertaining as the movie.

RIP, Greenbriar 12.

(Late Pass Edit: I actually re-watched The Wood last night. The movies are tied. I repeat: the movies are tied.)

But back to Brown Sugar: I realize that Love & Basketball is probably a better movie and that they are forever linked because L&B came first and Brown Sugar is pretty much the same movie except with hip-hop instead of basketballs, and it similarly included Sanaa Lathan as the main love interest. For those reasons, I can understand why Brown Sugar isn’t universally lauded the same way. But it was funnier (Love & Basketball wasn’t really that funny at all), Mos Def was tremendously hilarious, Taye Diggs was super corny and wore leather pants in the early 2000s in a movie about hip-hop, and Lathan was Sid Shaw, a music journalist who took over XXL magazine and was writing a hip-hop memoir of sorts, so it scored beaucoup points for personal relatability.

The fact that Brown Sugar came out in 2002 and I didn’t start blogging until 2004 is also a moot point, considering that R. Kelly said he came up with the remix to “Ignition” before the original song. The man created a remix to a song that didn’t actually exist yet.

Let that sink in.

Brown Sugar had love and it had hip-hop at the same damn time. It had New York City and the tension between selling out and “keeping it real.” It had the super-funny scene where Andre Romulus Ellis (Diggs) rolled up on his wife, played by Nicole Ari Parker, at the restaurant while she was out on a date with Richard Lawson (he sounded educated) and told the waiter that they were going to celebrate their divorce with an expensive bottle of champagne.

We had rapping ball players (in the vein of Allen Iverson or Kobe Bryant) in Boris Kodjoe’s Kelby Dawson. The movie had everything. It even had a ridiculous definition of “brown sugar,” for which the movie was named. It had Blackalicious songs playing throughout the movie—effectively, theBlazing Arrow album was the soundtrack (Blackalicious have long been one of my favorite rap groups, and they are the group that owns my favorite rap-group name of all time), with a few Kanye West-produced songs sprinkled throughout. It had Kanye West production!

And most important, it had the Hip-Hop Dalmatians.

If ever there was a rap group whose album I wanted to hear, it was them. They were Ren and Ten, a black-white rap group who weren’t sure who was named who, but they wore Dalmatian-looking furs and black-and-white clothes to illustrate that they were representing that whole unity thing. Because black and white. They take you one place, then they “go 160 degrees to the other side” and do something different!

The one song we partially heard, “The Ho Is Mine,” would have been a stone-cold hit. They remade­­—on Dre’s joking assertion in an impromptu meeting—Michael Jackson and Paul McCartney’s “The Girl Is Mine” into a song that I’d pay money to hear because in 2002, it perfectly summed up taking that old shit and turning it into that new shit that was super questionable. But in the words of the Hip-Hop Dalmatians, it was “real hip-hop, dawg!”

The Dalmatians were the type of group who took their nonsense seriously. Not once did they think they weren’t going to be the next best thing or were a novelty. No, they were “the real deal, Sid!” They brought something to the table, and nobody could tell them otherwise. They were every one-off rap group that ever existed. They were Smilez and Southstar before Smilez and Southstar, who coincidentally dropped their one song worthy of note, “Tell Me,” in late 2002. While I think that “Tell Me” would have been too sophisticated for the Dalmatians, it ain’t far off from their modus operandi because you can’t tell me that Smilez and Southstar didn’t take themselves seriously even though anybody who saw their video knew we’d never hear from Orlando, Fla.’s finest again.

But here’s why I believe in the Dalmatians and why I believe they would have ascended the ranks of hip-hop’s faux elite (at least until 2003, when 50 Cent changed the game back into gangsterisms for a spell): The little bit we heard would have been par for the course in the hip-hop landscape, except that they had a ridiculous gimmick, and that song was (potentially) fire! If they were any good on the mic­—which they probably weren’t, but neither was Silkk The Shocker, and look at his career—they could have been fun. And they would have hit right before hip-hop took itself too seriously with the death-and-demolition days. Keep in mind, Cam’ron was a thing during this time and he had computers ‘putin as he told you to ‘get ’em girl’.

Since we never actually heard them rap except for that one quick nonsensical freestyle when they were out with Dre and Reese and ran into Sid and Kelby at the restaurant, we don’t know if they were any good. But they had the swag and the confidence to be the greatest terrible duo of all time, and they were ready to take Millennium Records to the next level. They couldn’t take their shit to Rawkus because it wouldn’t fit with the “1-9-9-9” steez that Hi-Tek, Common and Sadat X were bringing to the table. (Side note: The story of Rawkus’ rise and fall is an amazing one. I read an oral history many moons ago, and it was a fascinating read.)

Now, I realize you may think that any love given to the Hip-Hop Dalmatians is ridiculous. And that may be true. They’re a fictional group, not unlike CB4, intended to point out the trash that the music industry was willing to stand behind and push in order to make money. But the truth is, the Hip-Hop Dalmatians are 95 percent of rap groups that existed from the late ’80s through the ’90s, marginal talents riding gimmicks to success. (Being a gangsta rapper from Los Angeles was a total gimmick in the ’90s, just as much as being part of the damn Wu-Tang umbrella, which featured something like 3 million members.)

We don’t know if the Dalmatians could rap, so I’m willing to give them the benefit of the doubt. The Dalmatians could have been great because they were going to be fun on the way to the inevitable split due to creative differences, when one wanted to keep doing the standard-issue pop-rap stuff and the other gained a knowledge of self and wanted to make music that better reflected his newfound understanding of humanity. Mostly, though, they had a real hit on their hands that I was pissed about never getting to see released on the soundtrack.

Ren and Ten might have been trash. But in 2002, they were the kind of trash you’d see in a Hoarders episode in 2011.

To the Hip-Hop Dalmatians, I salute you.

Real hip-hop, dawg.

Pun.

Panama Jackson

Panama Jackson is pretty fly (and gorgeous) for a light guy. He used to ship his frito to Tito in the District, but shipping prices increased so he moved there to save money. He refuses to eat cocaine chicken. When he's not saving humanity with his words or making music with his mouth, you can find him at your mama's mama's house drinking her fine liquors. Most importantly, he believes the children are our future. You can hit him on his hitter at panamadjackson@gmail.com.

  • OSHH

    “But the truth is, the Hip-Hop Dalmatians are 95 percent of rap groups that existed from the late ’80s through the ’90s, marginal talents riding gimmicks to success.”

    That is a strong statement, I don’t know if I agree.
    Sure there were trends, but is a trend a gimmick?
    And of course you had a few gimmicky folks, but hip hop itself was quick to call them folks out during this era.

    • panamajackson

      I don’t know yo. I feel like half these folks steezes, though trendy, were their rap gimmick. It’s the reason why we got a Lil Half Dead album.

      • JamesInstagram

        I agree with you, Panama. We’d like to look at our past wearing nostalgia goggles. But every decade has both brilliance and mediocrity. For every Kendrick Lamar, there is a Tyga.

        • WORD. For every Enter the 36 Chambers, there were cats like Sagat putting out “Funk That” and that Don’t Want No Short D man. Also, Wu Tang didn’t get *that* much airplay for anything that wasn’t them on someone else’s remix. Just facts.

          • OSHH

            Does radio determine dopeness?
            Most of what I listened to didn’t get NO airplay and we are talking gimmicks not wackness although most gimmicky folk are wack.

            • Radio doesn’t determine dopeness. What it does determine is what the casual fan is listening to. Radio follows the crowd, and the crowd was following that Bullsh*t.

              • Quirlygirly

                Please speak on it!! I was not immune either. I know I listened to some BS back in day. But I also knew the good stuff when I heard it

      • OSHH

        Interesting.

    • This is wrong on so many levels. For one, the Shiny Suit Era did happen. We have the recordings, and the videos and the articles. People forget how many units that stuff moved. Even MCs with longevity like Busta Rhymes and Jay Z were sucked into the trap. Let’s not rose colored glasses let us forget what happened. There was a reason that for a hot minute, the only commercial radio I listened to was Ed Lover in the Morning and Star and Buckwild.

      Still, every era has bad music. It just does. The good news is that you can pick it up from the blatantly obvious gimmicks they use. Though sadly, gimmicks can destroy careers. Das EFX had their whole style straight jacked to the point no one wanted to hear them anymore, and now they pay cafes in Germany for chump change.

      • Quirlygirly

        Miggy mic checka …1..2..checka..

      • Then DMX came…

        • Epsilonicus

          No ill word shall be spoken of early 2000s X

          • It’s Dark and H*ll is Hot was like the 1st album I was listened to. Like the one I purposely sought out and listened to it front to back. I relisten to his 1st 3 albums and am always surprised that he was at that point bigger than Jay. DMX popularity was definitely right place right time.

            • Epsilonicus

              I can literally recite every sng from Its Dark and H*ll is hot. That was also the first hip-hop album I bought.

        • DMX came out at precisely the right time. Five years earlier or later, he’s a trivia question. It’s not that he’s wack, but he’s so intense that he kind of needed the poppy stuff to balance his energy.

          • Epsilonicus
          • Right. And it’s not that he was a great rapper. He wasn’t terrible, but he got on because of charisma and Swizz Beatz. I’m pretty sure all 15 million or whatever of his first 4 albums sold almost entirely to the tri-state area.

            • Val

              I can’t speak for the rest of the country but DMX was huge in California back then.

              • Epsilonicus

                And Baltimore

              • Banged in the south too.

              • PhlyyPhree

                DMX was huge everywhere.

                • *re-listens to X-Is Coming* HOW

                  • PhlyyPhree

                    *swaps it out for What these B!tches Want*

                    That’s how Sway.

                    • Quirlygirly

                      I love that song. It gets me hype a fcuk!!

                • miss t-lee

                  EVERYWHERE.

                  • Earl’s issues aside “Slippin'” may be one of raps best insights into mental illness.

                    • Val

                      Along with, ‘My Mind’s Playing Tricks on Me’. Which is a classic. And it doesn’t get its due.

                    • CheGueverraWitBlingOn

                      “Aw man homeh…”

                    • miss t-lee

                      Indeed.
                      ‘Face has a few songs too. I’m looking forward to checking out his book that just dropped.

            • His charisma is off the charts high. But Swizz Beats did take the edge off and allow him to cross over. Still, his energy and the fact he can actually spit behind his craziness got him to sell units.

            • Did Swizz of Dame Grease carry the production load on that first DMX cd?

      • Wizznilliam

        I like your comment and agree in general but I can not get past the fact that I think that shiny suit reference was a shot at MC Hammer.. And yea he had the shiny hammer pants, and the crazy dancing (that got destroyed by Cube and others)… But dammit… I liked Hammer!.. I still get hype’d up on “Let’s Get It Started” and a few other Hammer joints. I look fondly back on my early teen years bumpin’ Hammer and wearing biker shorts. We didn’t need or want 10 MC Hammers.. But one, the original, was cool with me.

        • Epsilonicus

          It was a reference to Puffy

          • Wizznilliam

            Ohhh.. I went way too far back then. Hammer was the original Puffy, without the business skills of course.

            • Epsilonicus

              Definitely without the business skills lol

              • Val

                Hammer is still losing sleep over losing all that money.

                • Wizznilliam

                  How??.. Why??.. I still don’t get how someone can lose that much money. It seems impossible.. Apparently not to black folks.. Hammer, Tyson, Holyfield.. so much money down the drain.

                  • He ain’t lose it. He was paying EVERYONE that was around him.

                    • Wizznilliam

                      Yea… He was just giving money away. Dumb…

                  • Val

                    Not just Black folks, I hear Charlie Sheen is headed toward broke. But it’s not that hard. You can spend a million dollars in a few minutes and Hammer only lost 30 million or so.

                    • Wizznilliam

                      Nah.. Not just black folks.. The problem for all of them, and also lots of athletes, is that they get those multi-million dollar customized homes and dumb cars.. Outside of that (and Hammer just giving away money) I don’t see most people spending that much money so fast.

                    • Val

                      “I don’t see most people spending that much money so fast.”

                      Okay, well I won’t mention lottery winners then. Lol

                    • Wizznilliam

                      True… True… Mo’ money mo’ problems I guess. I’ll still take my chances though. I won’t be giving up any winning lottery tickets.

                    • MsSula

                      I have been catching up with Ballers (Superbowl fever I guess), and I can tell you that money can go VERY quickly.

        • That was a shot at Puffy and his aesthetic. But Hammer was legit. I still say “hey, they say you aren’t banging in New York…WHAT?!”

          • Wizznilliam

            Lol.. Right. Now all them old Hammer-ism are slowly coming back to me and will be stuck in my head for the rest of the day.

          • Quirlygirly

            I remember the first time I saw that video from the very beginning, I laughed soo hard. ..” so what chu gonna do about that..hammer!!”

            • CheGueverraWitBlingOn

              *cough cough* *ahem*…I”M GON TURN DIS MOTHA OUT!!

        • panamajackson

          When I think Shiny Suit rap…I ALWAYS think of Puffy.

          • miss t-lee

            We all do.

          • Wizznilliam

            Yea. It makes perfect sense now. I forgot about Puff and Mase for some reason and jumped all the way back to Hammer.. The OG shiny suit man. Back when shining and dancing was still cool.

          • CheGueverraWitBlingOn

            Yup. That’s what it means by definition. Puff and Mase.

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      If you were getting promos back in the day, is absolutely the truth.

      One cd that came in my box

      Lil Blunt and Indo G.

      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Antidote_(Indo_G_and_Lil%27_Blunt_album)

      This was on the heels of the Death Row era.

      The promo boxes were full of this nonsense.
      Maybe 4 years later it was Stretch and Bobbito wannabees, trying to be the next Aesop Rock…

      If you weren’t deep in the game, you might think that the copycats and clones were few and far between. But if you were rocking hockey jerseys but didn’t know who Gordie Howe is you probably have fond memories of

      Mic Geronimo
      Urban Thermo Dynamics
      Rasco
      Trinity Garden cartel
      Skinny Pimp
      Esham
      King Just
      Shadez of Lingo
      Hard to Obtain
      Clever Jeff
      Grav

      Etc. Lots of people hopping on trends.

      • The Master IC enters now in the game? LOL (Even though I still rock that song every now and then.) But yes, I remember every single group you mentioned, and those lyrics were some straight shenanigans.

        • Brooklyn_Bruin

          I wouldn’t trade that era for the world. Catch me listening to Lords of Flatbush on the low back with the Bushwackas. Mean Green and Voodoo. Mister Voodoo and Mister Complex…

          Funny how Eazy E’s Pharcyde/Souls of Mischief clones the Atban Klann, transformed themselves into one of the biggest acts in the world.

          • WORD. I forgot their original name. Which is why I can’t take them serious with their poppy stuff. Like I remember when you cats were backpackers. Stop.

      • OSHH

        Welp I wasn’t getting no promos that is for sure.

      • Reemo

        Whoa whoa fall off of Indo G. “Remember Me Ballin” is a certified wood hit from the early 2000s

      • miss t-lee

        Trinity Garden Cartel.
        Old Houston classics.

        • Brooklyn_Bruin

          As classic as maybe the Botany Boys or Street Military, or Fesu.

          Can’t recall the last time I was at a Houston jam and the dj pulled any of those dudes out.

          Old don’t mean classic, ask Racola Jam or Ganksta Nip.

          Now “Power Up” by the Wreck Shop Family, that’s a classic.

          *pours out some lean for Sharpstown mall*

          • miss t-lee

            I’ve heard the Botany Boyz out and about. Been a whole hot minute though.
            Don’t agree about “Power Up” being a classic.–good song though. That would have to be “Mo City Don” or Moe’s”June 27th” verse even maybe “This Is For My…”

            Remember Choice, 20 2 Life, The Convicts?

            • Brooklyn_Bruin

              All of em. Was always mystified how the convicts intro came off that OG Style album.

              • miss t-lee

                Ha!

            • Val

              Miss T, I’ve noticed that you are a certified hip hop-ologist. Very cool.

              • miss t-lee

                I know a little bit…about too much. :)
                Thanks Val.

  • JamesInstagram

    It’s ironic to me that a movie called “Brown Sugar” is one of the most vanilla-ass rom-coms featuring black actors. I watch “Two Can Play That Game,” just to balance the universe.

  • like one unit. u-n-i-t… why? because. right. thank you. i like that. now lets go.

    omg this whole post is why we [used to] go together, PeeJ!!!! i love it so much, and i want to hug it.

    • panamajackson

      you should definitely hug it.

      • Lea Thrace

        I feel like there is innuendo here. I want there to be innuendo here…

  • Ess Tee

    The way Dre curls Richard Lawson’s name around his tongue during that eatus interruptus scene still makes me chuckle as well as when he tapped the wine glass while singing “my divoooorrrcceeee.”

    Brown Sugar has so many other gems, too (for example, when Cav is tryna spit game at Francine at the dinner party. He was so awkward).

    • Ari

      That was the best part of the movie. Kind of saved it for me.

    • miss t-lee

      My DI- VORCE!!!!

    • Pinks

      Sooooooo awkward – but cute!

      • Ess Tee

        It was! But that was because the movie came out at the height of my “I mean, I wouldn’t mind being in Mos’s harem” phase.

        • Pinks

          My dad is good friends with Pharoah Monche, so during that whole Rawkus Records phase I was able to meet Kweli, Mos, Organized Konfusion, Big L and a whole bunch of other cats. Looking back, I’m mad I was too young to be a trollop and try to come up.

          • Your pops knows Pharoah Monche? I’m a huge fan of his music. HUGE. Like if I never needed an entrance theme, Right Here would be on the short list.

            Then again, a love for Rawkus Records did get me someone in the scene who just happened to be a former intern, so there’s that…

            • Pinks

              Yep – I didn’t even know he was a “star” until we were in the car one time and my dad was so hype their song had made it on the radio. He was always just Troy to me. It wasn’t until I got older that I realized how influential he was. Take note of a young Pinks at the 2:33 mark wearing a navy blue flower getup:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ftx21X6Fd3I

              • Be glad you’re married. That’s all I have to say. LOL

                • Pinks

                  I don’t know how to take that, but OK lol

                • Val

                  *watches Todd mac on the sly*

                  • The funny thing is that based on her story, there’s a better than even chance she’s cool with someone I used to date. That’s the thing. LOL I’m trying to counteract the rumors.

          • Jay Howard Gatsby

            can we double the upvote here for using trollop?

            • Pinks

              One of my favs

    • Jay Howard Gatsby

      Yo. Cav is me. I am Cav. Trying to segue small talk into a discussion of “flutes” – indirectly referencing Queen Latifah’s breasts – was masterful.

      • Ess Tee

        And he called her food “delicious and nutritious.” Just fumbling over words. LOL

        • Jay Howard Gatsby

          YO. Game (or lack thereof) recognize game (or lack thereof). I am Cavi!

          • Epsilonicus

            I was Cav all through HS.

            • Jay Howard Gatsby

              I’m still Cav at 30. It’s not as sad as Drake on Hotline Bling and that’s what I keep telling myself.

              • Nothing is as sad as Drake on Hotline Bling. When his nasally voice trailed off when he sang “Hanging with some girls I’ve never seen before” a sad little angel got its sad little wings.

                • Jay Howard Gatsby

                  Aubrey was Bret the Hurtman Hart when he found out ol girl had moved on. Finding out your “good girl” is being bad without you. Ah man.

                  • The funny part of that song to me is that he assumed he was the one who taught her “All of those things”. I just find it hilarious when cats do and say ish like that.

                    • Jay Howard Gatsby

                      remember when Ye did that on Blame Game?? Ahh, man. Hip hop today.

                    • Yeah. Ego is something else.

                    • Pinks

                      That skit was an instant classic tho.

                      I say “Yeezy taught me” in a bird voice no less than twice a week.

                    • Jay Howard Gatsby

                      and we made “reaposted” a thing.

                    • Yeezy reupholstered my p*ssy indeed! Wooo!

                    • PhlyyPhree

                      My sister and I reenact that skit WAYYYY too often.
                      “a n igga like me ain’t supposed to be gettin no poosy like this!!! This is some Cirque dee solay poosy right here!”

                    • Pinks

                      You done took this s hit to the nother mothafuggin level

                    • MsSula

                      Favorite song on one of my favorite albums of all time… just because of that skit. Lol.

                    • MsSula

                      And we understand why the Clapback heard around the world was so powerful. He been trolling that girl for some years now! Lolll.

                    • PhlyyPhree

                      YEAARRSSSSSSSSSSSS

    • panamajackson

      Quick story: Because of that line about Richard Lawson sounding educated, I own the gmail account: richardlawsonsoundseducated@gmail.com

      • PhlyyPhree

        Are you serious? Seriously? Because that’s awesome. I’m about to start sending fan mail to that account.

      • miss t-lee

        Only you PJ.
        Only you…lol!

      • Ess Tee

        Word? Lol!

    • MsSula

      Brown Sugar has SO MANY gems. And that Cav spitting at Francine is one of them.
      Cav talking about Casablanca is another one. I guess I just liked Cav. Lol.

  • NaturallyNini

    I had a serious flashback to high school (skull caps, vintage jerseys etc ) when you mentioned Southstar and Smilez. Lmao!

  • Smilez and Southstarr….

  • IsitFridayyet?

    Brown Sugar is one film that I don’t believe has aged well. To get into it, you had to be a certain age when the movie came out otherwise it doesn’t translate well.

    • Londa

      I was gonna write “Blasphemy!” in big, bold font; but then I chilled out and decided to write: To each his own.
      (But, I’m whispering it, though)

  • Ari

    The first time I saw the the Hip Hop Dalmations my immediate thought was that the Brown Sugar writers were picking on the Ying Yang Twins. Little did I know that they were actually foretelling the future of hip hop as we know it. I was only in my early twenties at the time, so more than likely I was a little shortsighted.

    OAN it also seemed like all of the black movies of hat time were trying to repeat the same successful formula as The Best Man. Brown Sugar was the most successful at it (The Brothers gets an Honorable Mention), but IMO the best thing about the movie was the soundtrack.

  • Asiyah

    I still have Mos Def’s “Brown Sugar (Extra Sweet)” in my head at least once a week. Love that song.

    • Love of my life by Common and Badu will always be my joint.

  • miss t-lee

    I’m hollering because this actually made sense. Although I thought the names were Rin and Tin? Like the dog? Maybe I’m wrong, but anyway.
    You really dug up Smilez and Southstar? Gold star for you.

    I also love Brown Sugar, so much that I own it.

    • OSHH

      I own it also, saw it with someone I loved, we were both hip hop heads. He broke my heart though so now it always feels melancholy.

      • miss t-lee

        awww. I’m sorry.

        • OSHH

          Girl it is okay. That was many moons ago but it is funny how we associate certain things with certain people.

          • miss t-lee

            Oh I now. There are whole albums I can’t listen to anymore because of certain folks…lol

            • OSHH

              Joints be ruinT. LOL

            • PhlyyPhree

              I have a whole list of songs/albums/places/movies that I have to watch or listen to with caution….or lots of liquor in order to insulate myself from the inevitable feels associated with them.

              • miss t-lee

                RUINT.

            • Pinks

              The Evolution of Robin Thicke always reminds me of how mean I was to the dude who bought it for me. If you’re reading this, sorry Rob. I was in a bad place.

              • miss t-lee

                Just get rid of it…lol

                • Pinks

                  The physical CD itself is gone, but the memories? Oh, the memories. How they linger.

                  *cue violin strings*

                  • miss t-lee

                    Whew, girl I know.
                    I KNOW.

              • Val

                There’s a whole year of music I can’t listen to without getting sad.

                • Pinks

                  Crazy how one song or even a couple of chords can put you right back into a place like it just happened.

                  Y’all done got me in my feelings. Sh it.

                  • Val

                    *hands PinksThaGangster a tissue*

                    • PhlyyPhree

                      10/10.
                      She’s going to use the tissue to cover the surveillance cameras while she robs a bank though. Just saying…

                    • Pinks

                      *wipes tears, crumbles tissue into a ball of dust*
                      *continues thuggery*

                • CheGueverraWitBlingOn

                  Me too…There almost a whole genre of music I had to put down. Don’t even wanna mention it.

    • Dougie

      Definitely Rin and Tin.

      • miss t-lee

        *daps*

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