Sherry Hall (AKA “Officer Becky”) And How The “Big, Bad, (Black) Dude” Is America’s Boogeyman » VSB

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Sherry Hall (AKA “Officer Becky”) And How The “Big, Bad, (Black) Dude” Is America’s Boogeyman

CBS46 screenshot

 

We keep cycling through the same macabre Groundhog’s Day events of learning of an egregious police shooting. Then protesting. Then simmering down. Then learning of yet another death. But perhaps the most ridiculous police-involved shooting in September shed no actual blood.

Sherry Hall, a White female police officer from Jackson, GA, claimed a Black man shot her and then galloped into the woods. Without her bulletproof vest, she swore she would’ve been a goner. The horrified, usually crime-free city of Jackson left no stone unturned. They stormed through the forest to defend the virtue and honor of the assaulted White lady cop. Her daughter even went on television and begged the unknown gunman to turn himself in.

Well, as it turns out, Officer Becky made the whole thing up. Authorities discovered she likely shot herself. Her tall tale unraveled less than two weeks after she conjured up the image of a wild, 6’1”, 230-lb Black boogeyman on the loose. She’s since checked herself into a facility for treatment. Her fellow officers will arrest her the moment she leaves the facility.

Thankfully, no Black men died as a result of her fraud, but the lie still wasn’t a victimless crime.

University of Florida law professor Katheryn Russell-Brown coined the term “racial hoax” in 1998 to denote a false reporting of a crime based on another person’s race. Overwhelmingly, Black males are the primary victims of racial hoaxes in America. Someone commits a crime or desires attention and decides the perfect person to blame is a big, Black dude. It’s happened over and over since slavery.

Each time I hear of a White woman inventing crimes perpetrated by an imaginary Black man, I think of Susan Smith. In case you don’t know or forgot, Smith lied in 1994 that a Black man kidnapped her two sons. She had actually driven her car into a lake and drowned the boys.

As with Officer Becky, it only took the police a little over a week to discover that Smith was lying. This tells me one thing: the story of a “big, black man” never has to be well thought-out. All the lie needs is the right person to sell it.

But Black people have a keen nose for bullshit. In Smith’s case, Black folks cocked their heads and wondered what sane Black man would steal two White kids who aren’t his? What brother argues with a lady cop (Officer Becky), shoots her, and then runs into the woods? What Black man carves a backward B into a White woman’s face after a mugging to make her vote for Obama? No one who exists.

The racist imagination not only transforms Black men into monsters, but it also makes their actions seem inscrutable. The boogeyman has no logic; it’s not human. The public readily accepts strange fiction surrounding Black men because it believes the big, bad boogeyman is capable of anything. People will mobilize without question to hunt down the boogeyman. People will shoot an unarmed teenager and say they saw a demon.

The danger in Officer Becky’s fraud becomes most apparent when the police do find someone who “fits the description” or who resembles the boogeyman lurking in their racist imagination. It’s what makes Stop and Frisk sound like a picnic. How many Black men get mistaken for the boogeyman? The belief in Black male inhumanity kills Black men weekly. Terence Crutcher looked like a “big, bad dude” to a police officer all the way up in a helicopter. Police pulled Philando Castile over because he “matched” a suspect with a “wide-set nose.” Darren Wilson described Michael Brown as Hulk Hogan.

It’s no coincidence Sherry Hall (Officer Becky) would pull a stunt like this while the country suffers from heightened unrest between cops and Black communities. Her easy reach for the shadowy Black male boogeyman is not a mental health issue: it’s symptomatic of American racism. She exploited a fear White America yet refuses to admit it harbors. And as long they imagine Black (boogey)men looming larger than life, they will always find a reason to hunt or shoot brothers to death.

Dara Mathis

Dara T. Mathis is a freelance writer newly based in the DMV and the sweet & snark behind TrulyTafakari.com. She tweets for the love of biscuits.

  • Adrienne_in_MTown

    “They stormed through the forest to defend the virtue and honor of the assaulted White lady cop.”

    What makes these white women so trustworthy? Why are they ALWAYS innocent until proven guilty and the people they lie on are guilty even after they are proven innocent? White women are not precious, rare stones. Many of them HAVE to lie and scheme for attention. Take these teachers – all white women that I’ve seen* – who sexually assault their students. They are not deemed monsters by the media, yet they ARE the worst kind of monster: a predator of a minor. It’s gross and they all need to stopped.

    *there are cases of male teachers doing the same things but there seems to be more activity in the white female that’s under age 25 teaching community when it comes to inappropriate relationships with students

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      Why? How?
      Generalized Thirst or pathological hatred of the black

    • Negro Libre

      Her claim that an armed suspect was still on the loose instilled fear in the small central Georgia city of just over 5,000. Jackson mayor Kay Pippin said she was “disappointed anyone would contribute to such fears.”

      “For two weeks, the good people of the city of Jackson poured out their hearts in expressions of concern and support for what we believed to be a police officer – one of our own – harmed in the line of duty, Pippin said.

      Basically, it’s two things.

      A) There’s a general “assumption” that no sensible person in a community of 5000 would ever dare to think that the story was BS…it came from a Police Officer after all.
      B) The Cop is “One of our own”….tribalism.

      • Adrienne_in_MTown

        I get it, I get it. It’s just frustrating. Black women have to have rallies, petitions and news conferences to get things done about the abuses they’ve suffered.

        • grownandsexy2

          And still no one cares.

    • Women abusing boys is a horrible sin as is. Still, a lot of this belief of White women is pandering to the p*ssy, point blank. They hope if they save her, they can hump her.

    • cyanic

      Women as predators of underage boys in the straight world is seen by most as a socially unspoken rite of passage. Either they wanted it but didn’t get it or they got it and it wasn’t a big deal. But I know quite a few who were ruined by a grown woman taking advantage of them before they even cared to go down that road.

      • That game is what keeps toxic masculinity in place. The idea that admitting the babysitter forced herself on you makes you less of a man is ridiculous. It’s insecurity and fear of being seen as weak in front of other men and it always saddens me when I see dudes doing this kind of thing to each other. Even worse when women mock men for being “soft”. WTF does that even mean?

      • Blueberry01

        Me too. Sexual assualt is sexual assualt.

        There are also alot of AA male celebrities (e.g. Chris Brown, Lil’ Wayne) who were assaulted when they were young, (probably did not receive adequate healing or therapy), and have displayed erratic behavior in their adulthood.

    • Maestro G

      I believe it stems in large part from the historical perception of white women as ‘pure’. White men perpetrated this myth since the beginning, in order to justify both their continued subjugation of Black folk as a whole, as they specifically targeted Black men for extermination based on fear, while at the same time targeting Black women to be their sexual slaves, to do things to them they wouldn’t do to a white woman because she was “too pure”. Jump forward to modern times, and they get the benefit of the doubt in almost every situation where it is her word against any POC, especially Black men.

      Not painting all 2520s with the same broad brush. Just taking a look at it from a historical perspective.

      • Tambra

        Exactly. In the Caribbean, where few islands had a large resident white population, white women were seen as the civilising element, even though there was evidence to prove the they were just as horrible slave owners. Further to ensure that black people or persons who had black blood in them knew their places, slave laws were changed so that children got their status from their mothers. Further elevating the position of white women.

        • I saw a documentary a couple weeks ago from the BBC (irony of ironies) on British slave owners. Did you know that 40% of the were women? It was common for windows to buy a plantation to generate an income to support them.

          • Tambra

            Not surprised because with the exception of Barbados, and to a lesser extent Jamaica, a lot of estate owners were absentee and estates were left in the hands of managers and management companies. So it would be easy for a woman in England to own an estate in the Caribbean. Hence that is why we have the Thomas Thistlewood and his wonderful diary. Its a good read if you can stomach it. Its a real Darby dose. Yup.

      • Blueberry01

        Exactly.

    • finisterre

      They’re only trustworthy when accusing a black man. When they accuse their own race they’re pretty much automatically disbelieved.

      • Adrienne_in_MTown

        How crazy is that?

        • Blueberry01

          White male supremacy > white female superiority

  • Buster Cannon

    How many Black men get mistaken for the boogeyman? The belief in Black male inhumanity kills Black men weekly.

    It stems from them not really seeing them as human. If you don’t actually spend time with black people but you police them, you see them more as a set of stereotypes and statistics instead of an actual human being. I think it’s one of the reasons why a white guy will get more lenient sentences; a white cop will more likely see a white dude the way they’d see their friend/sibling/cousin/etc. The same cop will run into a black dude and see him as a potential threat/murderer/killer, never mind the fact that he’s never spent and quality time with a black man a single day in his life.

    • -h.h.h.-

      (in my opinion) a lot of us see each other, as the other, which may be the basis of humanity’s prejudices (good and bad); that bein’ said, when police do it, it rarely ends well.

    • Negro Libre

      I think it’s simpler:

      White person – individual
      Black person – representative (especially when it’s a negative)

    • Question

      Or never mind the fact that he actually does spend time with black men every day – his colleagues, peers, other parents at his kids’ school or at church etc – but he exceptionalizes those black people in favor of stereotypes. Why? Because those stereotypes ultimately reinforce notions he has about himself – that he is superior.

      I don’t buy the “I don’t know any black people therefore I’m racist” line of reasoning.

      • QueenRaven23

        Wow. I love this statement.

      • cedriclathan

        I grew up in a white neighborhood. When bussing started in the ’70s, black kids were bussed to my school. The white kids lined the fence and chanted, “Here comes the bus, here comes the ni%%3rs.” I grab one and punched him in the mouth, at which point he replied, “Oh, we don’t mean you, you’re a good ni$$3r.” So, yes, exceptionalism is the norm for white people who don’t interact with black people.

        • Question

          Exceptionalism is also the norm for people who DO interact with Black people. I had to cut ties with a VERY close friend when I realized (slowly, over ~15 years) that she exceptionalized me and my family. That the default in her mind for Black folks was bad and that me and my family whom she knew well, were “different” and “good”.

          That realization sucks. Man does it suck. :(

          • L8Comer

            I had a similar experience. It did suck. I also realized she was using me as her token black friend. Someone called her out for a racist comment and she was telling me about it. And she let me know she cited me as a reason that was impossible .

            • Mochasister

              Lol! I can relate. I have a coworker on my job who I feel might be trying to claim me as her “Black” friend. Especially since her other good Black friend retired last year.

              • L8Comer

                lolol, im sorry but this made me chuckle. I can just imagine her like “Damn, I lost one…. oh Look!! Another!”

                • Mochasister

                  Actually I do think it’s kind of like that. She has told me about how she never knew about racism growing up until she moved to California. I just listen and smile my “wypipo full of booboo” smile at her.

                  • L8Comer

                    oh brother lol, i guess she wants to tell you all about what she’s learned for a gold star

                    • Mochasister

                      Yes. And the funny thing is she’s not as unprejudiced as she thinks. One time we were in the staff room and she starts talking about immigrant Latino men and how they leave their families in Mexico (because all Latinos are Mexican) and come here to start new families and that was a shame. Then she turns to my coworker, who is Latina, and asks her why Latino men behave this way. I was mortified.

                    • L8Comer

                      Wow! Smh! She’s going to catch the wrong person on the wrong day and I hope it’s not u and that you get to witness it lol

            • Blueberry01

              I’ve come to the realization that white people just don’t WANT to understand the definition of racism.

              I think they believe racism means, “one without friends of minority race”

              • Mary

                You know what? I don’t care if they don’t hang out with any minorities as long as they know that we human and rational beings.
                Exceptionalism means the token is human and rational but no one else is, and that’s still as dangerous as Be my the cop and Susan Smith.
                I don’t hang out with Asians, but I know they’re human and rational , so no boogeyman stories gonna fly out my mouth. Long as I don’t put their lives in danger it doesn’t matter whether or not I ever have Asian friends.

                • Blueberry01

                  …which will probably still take another century for them to acknowledge…SMH

            • Gibbous

              I hope you cut her! I had to do the same this year. I called her on some racist crap in her fb, and she cried about how hurtful I was! Bish, What!?!

              • L8Comer

                Smh, yep I did. I had to. I was so disappointed it really hurt. Oh well lol

          • Blueberry01

            Yup. It surely does.

          • I have been the recipient of the “but you’re the good kind” example but it went horribly further. I’m very light, even for a mixed girl and this woman after stating when it came up in conversation that she had previously had no idea that I was “colored” (no, really) asked me why I didn’t just pass myself off as white- “wouldn’t it just make things easier?”. Soooo…. you’re not racist, and you don’t really think racism is a problem but you just acknowledged that being white would make my life easier and encouraged me to shed my blackness to make everyone else comfortable and as a reward ride in the front seat of the privilege train??? You know how hard it is to politely explain that I love my black (not colored) instead of hitting a person dead in the mouth in a workplace setting? I also get the, “but you’d never know you’re black because you don’t talk like you’re black” speech quite a bit. I can’t with folks sometimes.

            • Mochasister

              I don’t doubt for one minute that wypipo know they receive better treatment simply for having white skin. Deep down inside they know. They like to deny it because they realize it’s unfair and that they’re not as special as they think they are. That’s why I appreciate the comedian Louis C K for acknowledging it.

              • lkeke35

                I know they know. Deep down inside, they all know. Just ask one of them if they would truly trade places with any random black person, of the same socio economic station as them, and see how they answer. If their answer is no, then ask them why not.

              • I’ve experienced it for myself- I check MY privilege because I know I get preferential treatment based on the way I look, people act like I’m in the club and then suddenly when I say something about being black suddenly I go from funny to “cray”, silly to “ghetto”- seamlessly. I laugh when folks try to tell me a single dayum thing about how folks get treated. The difference between how I’m treated vs my also mixed but much darker husband is shameful. One day I’ll write my “memoirs about a girl you ain’t know was black!”

                • Mochasister

                  Sounds like a good title for an interesting book! Oh, they know. But many of them like to pretend that we’re all drinking Coca-Cola and singing Kumbaya around a camp fire (don’t ask. I was born in the seventies. This actually was a cheesy commercial from my childhood.) Instead of them actually doing some serious work in dismantling their oppressive system of white supremacy (and yes I put the responsibility for that work on them. They created it. They should dismantle it.), they want to hold onto it and still have a “relationship” or “connection” with nonwhites.

            • Question

              But…but…but you’re not supposed to like being Black – you’re supposed to be ashamed – because all Black people are ________, right, except you (and your family, and probably most people in your family, and your friends, and their families, and…etc etc etc?

              I remember when House of Lies first came out – the Don Cheadle show based on consulting. At the time it came out, I worked for one of the big firms, so there was a lot of talk about the show. And one of my Managers over dinner said “yea, the show is so unrealistic, especially cuz like Don Cheadle is the senior partner”. Screech. Music stopped. The partner at dinner tried to change the subject, and I piped up, looking dead at the partner “interesting, what do you mean?”. Stammer yammer blammer. Forget the fact that the head of our office is a Black partner, who’s also the head of nationwide MBA recruiting (Blackman recruited HIM), one of the most well liked partners in the country AND one of the youngest people in the firm’s history to make partner (he did it in his 20s). And he’s not the only Black partner in the system (there aren’t many but there is more than one).

              They refuse to connect the dots.

              • lkeke35

                Honestly, I ve encountered this, some of them are so myopically narcissistic that they can’t see anything outside their own personal bubble.

                It’s like an entire race of people are just walking around with one eye closed and the other one only half open, (if they’re awake at all.)

            • lkeke35

              Black people have always had to WORK very very hard at having patience. Them muscles is flexed. It’s gotten so bad that even professionally smiling Black people, in tv, have had to take a deep breath, before they lose control of their hands.

              • Mochasister

                We have to maintain control over ourselves. Losing control of ourselves quite literally could mean the difference between life and death. It was that way in the past and it still is like this. Show a little too much anger and you get branded an angry Black b****/ni66er. If you’re lucky, that’s all that happens. If it’s your unlucky day, you’ll have the police called. And we’ve all seen how empathetic the police are to the Black experience in the States.

        • Gibbous

          Reminds me of the chapter on being the “black friend” in Batatunde Thurston’s book, “How to be Black.” Also the chapter on how to be Black at work!

          Painful, but true.

      • Diego Duarte

        Ashamed to say I “exceptionalized” my black friends from High School as well. During the first year after I moved to the US I had some notably bad encounters with Blacks (mostly neighbors and kids being arseholes), so I had no frame of reference regarding African-American culture. This being Texas, Whites were all too happy to reinforce any negative views I would have about Blacks. It wasn’t until I became friends with Blacks that I realized how full of sht my views were. By then I’d been living 2-3 years in the US.

        • Mochasister

          You are Latino, no? Do you feel that white people “exceptionalize” Latinos?

          • Diego Duarte

            Good question. I’d say it’s been half and half.

            I was already fluent in two languages (Spanish and French) before I moved to the US, I was in honor roll and had perfect attendance, I took AP classes in High School and passed the French AP test with a 5/5 in 10th grade, I picked up English in a little over a year after moving to the US, ended up becoming an attorney. In short, I was a nerd (who am I kidding, I still am).

            Even then, I still experienced loads and loads of racism. I was frisked for drugs with no better excuse than “I don’t trust Latinos with black jackets”, I was labelled an illegal several times and a beaner (despite the fact that I’m not Mexican), I’ve been called $pic more times than I care to count, and one of my close white acquaintances would routinely treat me like an ignorant immigrant.

            Regarding the people impressed by my achievements, when it’s whites it was mostly back-handed compliments regarding how “remarkable” I was for a Latino. It was always about race for them. I remember this gay dude from high school picking up my report card and saying “Huh, I guess they do have SOME education in Peru”. It’s as if I didn’t have any business having the kind of brains I did as a Latino. And when there were comments made in my presence about Hispanics in general (some kid said in front of me “All Spanish speaking countries are $hit”) they were quick to make it clear that I was an exception to that general rule.

            • Blueberry01

              So, in short, yes.

              • Diego Duarte

                Yup. Not as badly as people exceptionalize Blacks though. Thing is, Latinos is a very broad term. People assume all Latinos are brown, but it couldn’t be farther from the truth. Latinos come in all colors. I know plenty of Latinos who could pass for white people, including my father who’s of Portuguese and German descent.

                Which would explain why a lot of Latinos are actually racist. The reason why it’s mostly Latinos of indigenous descent immigrating to the US is because there’s plenty of racism, from Mexico to the Patagonia (tip of Argentina). They are subjected to a treatment similar to African Americans in the US, and are less liable to get called for good jobs. Seeing how our economies aren’t as good or productive as the US’s economy, they usually choose to immigrate North or to Europe, where they’ll still be discriminated but at the very least they’ll have better economic opportunities.

                This goes back to colonial times and the implementation of Spanish “castas”. Where the “pure blooded” Spanish immigrants where labeled as “peninsulares”, the offspring of Spanish immigrants born in the colonials were called “criollos”, and the mix between the Spanish and the indigenous population were called “mestizos”. Beneath them were the “indios”, the “negros” (blacks), and the combination of them “zambos”.

                That mentality still persists today, and Latinos take pride in being a lighter shade of brown than their brothers. Being lighter than Blacks, we’re also less liable to be discriminated. I’ve always been conscious I don’t get it as bad you guys do. It’s a wonder you haven’t rebelled yet.

                • Blueberry01

                  Sí, estoy de acuerdo contigo y sé sobre “la mejora de la raza”.

                  • Diego Duarte

                    Es una maldita tara del colonialismo que todavía no se abandona.

            • Mochasister

              Thank you for your response. I sometimes wonder about other people’s experience with them. I am sorry that you’ve had these experiences. It can be infuriating at times.

              • Diego Duarte

                I’ve yet to meet people more ignorant than whites (be them anglosaxon or Hispanic). And I’ve yet to meet more ignorant whites than American whites. People from back home can hardly believe the anecdotes I got from the US.

                I recall this one instance this white friend of mine, was b1tch1ng about having gotten caught skipping class and being sent to detention. She was livid because other people had been skipping too, but nothing happened to them. So I decided to make a point through an analogy:

                Me: “Ashley, have you ever gone fishing?”

                Ashley: “Diego, are you retarded? This is an island! Of fcking course I’ve gone fishing!”

                Me: “Have you ever caught all the fish in the ocean?”

                Now, you and I can perfectly understand the point I was trying to convey. Not miss “Becky of the year” and her white cohorts though. They spent the remaining 45 minutes trying to educate this third-world savage on how it was impossible to catch all the fish in the ocean, and how if you did it you would be causing irreversible, ecological harm (as if whites ever really cared about that).

                I’ve got plenty of these stories. PLENTY. I grew up hearing dumb-blonde jokes back home, but they NEVER made much sense to me until I immigrated to the US.

            • Mary

              And you’re so articulate, my! *eyeroll*

              • Diego Duarte

                My sister and I once went to a French restaurant in jeans, and we were getting some serious shade by a family of whites who had come dressed in their fanciest clothes. Now, having attended a French school from kindergarten all the way to middle school we speak perfect and fluent French, so we exchanged the most devious and evil of smiles, sat down next to their table and proceeded to speak French for the rest of the night.

                You should’ve seen their faces. Forget a picture, I wanted to pull out a canvas and immortalize their shock for posterity. Maybe even hang it at the Louvre Museum.

            • lkeke35

              I’m a total geek girl and I’ve gotten that and I know a lot of nerdy black people have experienced that, too. I’m sorry you had to walk through white peoples sh**.

    • Moderate Democrat

      Or the fact that black males murder each other per capita more than any other group?

  • La_Dee_Da

    I had a thought the other morning about the current (and historical) state of affairs concerning America’s police force.
    I wonder if in the grand scheme of things, these murders committed by officers, are a part of a more tragic trait.
    Authority preying on the vulnerable.
    I couldn’t help but think about the instances of nurses abusing our Elders in nursing homes…
    Or daycare providers abusing our babies…
    Or teachers sexually assaulting our students…
    Slave masters – doing ALL of what they did (rape, beatings, Psychological damage etc.)
    Abusive spouses abusing spouses…
    I wonder if in some of us, there is just this really ugly and sadistic nature to prey on those we deem vulnerable. In saying this, I am not dismissing the racial element of this murders of black people at the hands of police officers, but I can’t help but think that they are displaying a side of “human nature” that we aren’t always willing to acknowledge.
    In regards to the lying troll cop – white women have been lying on black men for centuries!!! (and I don’t understand why some black men still just gotta have that snow bunny. She gonna get you killed!)

  • “They stormed through the forest to defend the virtue and honor of the assaulted White lady cop.”

    Soooooooooooo the same chit that worked in Rosewood, still works in 2016? Got it!

    http://www.remarxofexcellence.blogspot.com

  • This kind of is like colorism for Black men. Sort of. There are degrees of difference in how “scary” of a Black man you are to non-Black people. Not that we aren’t all considered N*ggers at the end of the day. Someone that looks like me is going to register lower on the “Scary Black Man” than a dark skin bearded Black man that’s 6’3″ and 200lbs+.

    • I definitely agree. I’m the Super Saiyan N*gger, who is going to destroy European led civilization. You’re just different.

      • Freebird

        Call me Hannibal…prepared to lead the dark forces over the alps to attack Rome.

    • True. I don’t think any white person would look at you and feel threatened due to your stature alone.

    • Buster Cannon

      More traditionally masculine traits = higher perceived threat

    • I fully agree. Smaller stature and lighter skin is always going to be seen as LESS threatening (but…not entirely safe) Also…hairstyle plays a role. A clean cut (well dressed) tall dark skin man won’t be seen as threatening as a the same man…with maybe…like some fuzzy braids…or locs…and facial hair. Like…there are so many variables that make black men (and women) more or less acceptable.

    • A small snake is still a snake, Ricky. The method of dealing with the snake which ranges from avoidance to destruction is what makes it all so terrible.

      • “A small snake is still a snake” *writes this down.

        • Other_guy13

          Phrasing???

        • Brass Tacks

          I laughed.

          • Speaking from personal experiences @disqus_cV0KzUqZML:disqus ? *takes out note pad again*

            • Brass Tacks

              You want to be the judge?

      • miss t-lee

        Say it.

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      Which is how light skinded men are able to get away with so many crimes.

      Yacub’s blood.

      The prophet O’Shea Jackson once opined that the Devil is a savage mother effer, which is why he was lighter than the average brother.

      How else can we explain Drake, Malcolm Little, and Huey Newton?

      • ? jesus

        • Brooklyn_Bruin

          Him too.

          Hair of wool, skin of bronze, child of an unwed mother of suspicious parentage..

          Laying around with women of ill repute, thieves,

          Turning wholesome water into wine, stretching some bread into a fish fry…

          Which then ultimately lead to the subjugation of dark skin peoples of Africa leading us to the here and now.

          Perhaps there is something to this idea that the true enemy of the black man is the the light skin black man.

          *looks askance at Bob Marley*

          • MsSula

            You win the internet. LMAO.

      • A lot people think Malcolm looks like Denzel and was from Detroit.

        • Brooklyn_Bruin

          Lansing stand up!

          Is there a statue or a plaque?

      • brothaskeeper

        I seent it. It’s found in the Book of Cube 1:87.

  • Let me just say it. CUCKOLD. Yep, that’s it.

    Notice that White women cry fear of r*pe and murder Black men, while White men just get nervous about kicking it to Black women, like they aren’t interested. What’s the difference? The former forecloses $exual access, while the other one enhances it for White men.

    It’s America’s $exual original sin. The regulars know how I get down, and one can reasonably guess what it is that I do. Still, I’ve found it amazing that people who are willing to be beaten up and tied up and humiliated (or dish it out) find simple intercourse with a Black man to be beyond the pale. For all the toys I have in my bag, the scariest one lies between my legs.

    Once you get that, the Susan Smith’s of the world make sense. They tap into a deep fear inculcated in anyone born and raised in this country. Homegirl wanted to engage in self harm for sympathy, and she knew exactly how to frame it.

    • Other_guy13
      • Where did I lie though?

        • Other_guy13

          You didn’t…you just didn’t hold back at all..i wasn’t ready

          • My activities have made me face this stuff in the mirror hardcore.

            • Other_guy13

              People look at me crazy cuz I don’t rock with them…I just don’t trust em.

            • brothaskeeper

              I’m waiting for the #HotTodd memoirs to drop on Kindle. A page-turner!

          • LMAO nor was I.

            • NonyaB

              Me three neither!

          • PhlyyPhree

            Actually, Todd’s been really tame lately. I was wondering if he had a “Come-to-Jesus” moment.
            Either that or a gag order.

            • Tambra

              Me thinks you will have to probe further.

            • The correct answer is Yes

            • Other_guy13

              Gag order….really. I need to get my mind right lol

              • L8Comer

                Hahaha my mind went there too.

            • Kas

              Gag ball?

              • PhlyyPhree

                He did say he had a huge bag of toys

        • brothaskeeper

          I have no qualms.

      • Mochasister

        Love this gif!

    • miss t-lee

      Welp.
      We can just pack in today’s post.

    • Negro Libre

      The cuckolding thing is two folded: the actual thing act itself isn’t that bothersome, it’s the public knowledge or more importantly public “suspicion” of it that is. That’s why Donald Sterling was so mad at his sidepiece: he almost expected her to be jumping on black D, he just didn’t want his friends or others suspecting it, with all the pics she was taking on instagram, twitter and the rest.

      As for the mental health thing, I probably wouldn’t look at it this way, but Americans tend to be gullible when it comes to the diagnoses of mental health patients; they hear enough tragic stories of past family life, chexual abuse, bullying and depression and then you can pretty much convince most people that that somehow is the source of OCD, NPD or some other 3-Letter Acronym for a disorder that people simply do not understand. Blame Freud and Psychoanalysis. People should be more skeptical about a profession that claims that about 1/4 of the entire population suffers from one kind of mental health disorder or the next and voila, they have the cure, especially when their methodology for deciding whether you do or do not have a disease is based off spectrums rather than experimentation.

      • Mr. Mooggyy

        Americans seem to be gullible for the mental health patients who are non-POC! Alla the San Diego Suburbs.

        • blueevey

          There was so much wrong with this encounter. SD has emergency psychiatric response teams (pert) that weren’t called out that should have been. I hope the cop that shot Alfred Olango is charged but our DA is shady af.

          (I’m from san diego)

      • Brooklyn_Bruin

        Somebody at Pfizer is making money off of this.

        Though one like myself can imagine a meeting at corporate where someone actually uncovers an off label use of a drug that made people not racist.

        Should we market this?

        Should we take it ourselves?

        • Negro Libre

          It might actually happen in the next decade or so; the DSM is heavily influenced by Social zeitgeist.

          We can call it Xenophobic Melanin Oppositional Disorder.

      • About the mental health thing, it’s scary how variable the biological basis can be. Things like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are well nailed down biologically. Then you have anxiety and depression on the other end of the spectrum. Yikes!

        You’re so right about public knowledge being the key accelerant. It’s a way of covering for their own insecurities about whether they deserve a woman. They know they feel inadequate, so they have to puff themselves up to hide it.

      • Blueberry01

        How would you conduct an experiment to determine if someone is depressed? Would you count the number of times they drank excessively, maxed out their credit card, had unprotected chex with a stranger, or gained/lost weight within two weeks?

        • Negro Libre

          Yes and no.

          There’d probably have to be a long series of sets of behaviors that didn’t match up with a person’s behavior with the vast majority of his/her life before they started to seek out assistance, there’d also have to be active attempts to take certain positive actions, with a consistent result of impotence to do so. And then there would be an experiment to see if with a certain guide or in a different environment, if such problems would still remain before declaring that a person was suffering from depression or not.

          For most people in the health industry, including sometimes the patient, it’s much easier to list 5 or 6 different possible disorders, write a prescription and then let roll the dice to see how things come out.

          • Blueberry01

            Then, you’d be relying on their self-reports of their past behavior (which may or may not be accurate or complete); thus, you couldn’t have a control group. This would not be a true experiment – instead a qualitative look into someone’s perceived life.

            Therapy would be an effective measure at this point to determine what range of behaviors this person exhibits (or has exhibited in the past), as well as how it is affecting their daily life. In terms of prescribing medicine, it is an option, but giving a laundry list of behaviors just to receive medicine (which a lot of patients do) is never effective in the long-run. Instead, coupling talk therapy (in whatever discipline you prefer) with medication (if you even need it) usually works best.

            • Negro Libre

              Let me just say, from personal experience, I’m one of those who views meds as last resort, just pointing out the realities of the profession, that usually the interests at play prefer the pill be given, whether it’s the insurance company, which doesn’t want to deal with the unpredictability of the duration of therapy, and the interests of the client, who usually has to pay 100-150 /hr out of pocket per session.

              Secondly, unless you’re willing to go the neuroscience approach and analyze the actual brain, you’re relying primarily on the testimony of the client to give you his or her history of behavior. The purpose of this isn’t necessarily to determine whether the person is suffering from depression or not, but rather to see what the person is going through period and whether or not it is consistent with a long range of other disorders including depression. This is typical of what is done with general practitioners.

              • Blueberry01

                Yes, I’m well aware of it, too. This was one of the main reasons I decided not to go to medical school, in hopes of becoming a child psychiatrist.

                But, you’re initial statement was, “People should be more skeptical about a profession that claims that about 1/4 of the entire population suffers from one kind of mental health disorder or the next and voila, they have the cure, especially when their methodology for deciding whether you do or do not have a disease is based off spectrums rather than experimentation.”, which suggests that you could run a true experiment to determine whether someone had a mental heath disorder.

                But, you can’t and we both explained (and know) why. This is why we have to do as you stated, “…see what the person is going through period and whether or not it is consistent with a long range of other disorders including depression”.

                Now, I believe that your true concern revolves around the current methods for identifying the type and severity of a depressive disorder (for example) in a patient. Or, maybe it’s your disatisfaction with how mental health professionals use the spectrum to assess behavior.

                Either way, I agree.

    • mr. steal your costco samples

      man the worst thing you can call a 2520 GOPer now is “cuck”

    • Valerie

      “for all the toys I have in my bag”

      Hmm….

      • Brooklyn_Bruin

        He needs to teach a class! If there were dms on disqus, that box would be overflowing.

        • Valerie

          LOL that statement just took me off guard.

          • Brooklyn_Bruin

            I’m sure. *wink wink*

      • Other_guy13
        • Valerie

          I am curious but I think I’ll just stay curious. No need to fall down the rabbit hole lol

          • Other_guy13

            You choice of words today…anywho….curiosity has it’s own reason for existing I suppose. I’m sure you know what’s best lol

            • Valerie

              LOL!!!!!!

          • L8Comer

            Please do. And report back

      • I kept it somewhat light, but this is a real, and sad, issue.

    • Asiyah

      It is all pretty sexual. You have a great point.

    • NonyaB
    • Brass Tacks

      I’m counting that “For all the toys I have in my bag” line as a bar.

      *Inserts three Flame emojis*

      • Other_guy13

        Bruh know what he doing…i’m just gone sit back and watch today…this should get good.

        • Brass Tacks

          Yea… Ruby is stirring up shenanigans down below that I also find interesting.

          3H…dove in #forallofus, so i’m content to stay in the boat and watch this all unfold through the glass floor.

          • Other_guy13

            Hmm…Ruby…stirring up nonsesnse…why am I not surprised? I may peak but I don’t think I shall engage…I actually need to work today lol

        • If I could find a way to keep myself and people from being easily tracked down, I could write a regular series on this ish. Trust.

          • Other_guy13

            I have been advised not to write about my stories. I really really want too as well. Some of these situations are too funny/ interesting for the public not to know. I’ll live vicariously through you once you do decide to drop a few post.

            • PhlyyPhree

              Same advice for you.
              Write it anyway. Folk can’t get mad if it’s truuueeee

              • Other_guy13

                I’m sure bae would leave me…esp if my name is associated with it

                • PhlyyPhree

                  Tell her the people have a right to know and then get a ghostwriter. She can thank me later when the profits roll in.

          • PhlyyPhree

            You should. Give them all letters instead of names. Or something.

          • LMNOP

            Fake name?

    • LMNOP

      I’m impressed that you managed to tie in your Chex life into a post about racist police. We don’t call you Hot Todd for nothing.

      • I’ll put it to you like this. Recent months have gotten me more conscious about what I do, and has made it clear that we can’t and shouldn’t, isolate ourselves from the larger world.

        • L8Comer

          That’s great Todd

    • AnswerMe

      I feel like if I somehow gained access to the special places you practice in, I’d just know you when I saw you. Nod and think that’s Magical Todd’s azz right there.

  • :..The danger in Officer Becky’s fraud becomes most apparent when the police do find someone who “fits the description” or who resembles the boogeyman lurking in their racist imagination. It’s what makes Stop and Frisk sound like a picnic. …:

    Shiddy part is – no matter what or who they dedcribe, they’re gonna find SOMEBODY. She could’ve said “…with a unicorn horn, and a brother would still be hauled in.

    • AmberFU
      • Taken in for sure!

        • AmberFU

          Did you see Officer Becky? Did you use your horn to menace Officer Becky??

      • brothaskeeper

        That came on the other night. One of those movies that I HAVE to watch all the way through everytime it comes on).

        • RhetoricalReverie

          This was my first DVD purchase. I still have it. Bruce Willis makes some of the best awful movies.

        • Gibbous

          I actually found a CD of the musician who performed the Alien aria. I love this movie in SO many ways. (My BF’s dog is named Leeloo.)

    • PDL – Cape Girl Shero

      I know this is a serious issue but I cackled at your last line.

  • Really…he “galloped” into the woods. These people are wild with their made up stories. I remember the story of Susan Smith…I was all of 10 years old and thought to my self… “she’s a liar”. Everything about her just reeked of LIES!

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      Galloped. Yet I’m betting the verbal score on the SAT isn’t nearly as loquacious.

    • miss t-lee

      Galloping is where you knew this was some bullsh*t.

      • Tambra

        He is an animal after all.

      • LOL exactly. Who describes people as “galloping” No one…that’s who. No one who was really just shot at anyway.

        • miss t-lee

          No.
          One.

        • KeyBrad

          I actually imagined a black man galloping into the woods…that takes a lot of effort.

        • grownandsexy2

          I ain’t ever seen a BM gallop. LOL

      • Asiyah

        Galloping is an interesting adjective considering the only favorable stereotype of Black men that her kind hold on to for dear life.

        • Tambra

          Beast of burden. Why is that so hard to understand?

          • Asiyah

            It’s…not…lol

        • NonyaB

          Interesting point; stallion vs galloping.

        • MsSula

          She was in the middle of her Erotica fantasy…

          • Tambra

            * dead*

        • miss t-lee

          Definitely.

      • Jae Starz

        Agreed!

      • cedriclathan

        I’m going to have to see a white woman and just randomly start galloping. Film at 11:00….

        • miss t-lee

          Thank you for this laugh…lol

    • Mochasister

      “Galloped.” Smdh. Was she talking about a human or an animal? Oh, wait. Everyone knows Negros have supernatural abilities that other humans don’t.

  • Other_guy13

    Well this has been a thing for a while…ever seen King Kong

    http://www.dailykos.com/story/2009/5/29/736561/-

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5066156

    There are a few other articles on this but I think you get my point. Nothing new…she is just keeping in line with the narrative.

  • miss t-lee

    I ain’t believed one of these white women’s tall tales since Susan Smith.

    • Adrienne_in_MTown

      Tall tales… LOL

      • miss t-lee

        Gotta call em what they are…lol

    • Cleojonz

      I had to google her. I totally forgot about this case. And wow it’s been 22 years.

      • miss t-lee

        Yup. Time flies.
        Them poor babies.

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