Pop Culture, Race & Politics

Rappers Do Dumb-Ass Things, And Say Dumb-Ass Sh*t. Why Is This News Now?

1365454852_ll-cool-j-brad-praisley-467

On the strength of his Ether-related “comeback,” there are few albums I anticipated more than Nas’s Stillmatic. (Honestly, Wu-Forever and MBDTF are the only other albums I waited for with that type of anxiety.) He didn’t disappoint, either, as tracks such as Second Childhood and Rewind exhibited the type of ambitiously—even painfully—detailed creativity long-time Nas fans had been expecting from him.

The album climaxes with One Mic, a track that somehow managed to pull all of Nas’s best qualities together to create a song that some critics called “the best song of the decade.”

Perhaps the most memorable and rewindable part of that song combines Jesus, bullets, and a bit of tricky math to create a four bar stretch that I considered to be one of the best, most creative, and most clever collection of lyrics I’d ever heard.

Jesus died at age 33, there’s 33 shots

From twin Glocks there’s sixteen apiece, that’s 32

Which means one of my guns was holding 17

27 hit your crew. 6 went into you

I listened to this song again the other day. And, while the track and those lines still sound as hot as ever, something dawned on me. A question. Three, actually.

“Wait, what the f*ck is he talking about? How the f*ck do you go from Jesus to shooting random n*ggas in a 13 word stretch? And, what’s the connection between Jesus’s age and the number of bullets you needed to murder this anonymous crew?”

Now, I’m not saying this to pick on Nas. He remains one of my favorite rappers. But, songs like One Mic and my reaction to it remind me of one of the first things I learned about rap:

Rappers are prone to say shit that sounds smart and clever and intellectual and witty but makes no f*cking sense. You could even argue that a very, very, very high percentage (I’d guess somewhere between 40 and 60) of the most clever, rewindable, and “higher-level” sounding bars are created because…

A) It sounded good

B) He figured out that “euphemism” and “new religion” kinda rhyme with each other, and thought it would be cool to find a way to put that in a song

Mind you, I’m not saying that all rap is like this. Most of the best rappers put a decent amount of thought and effort into constructing their lyrics, and even the nonsense is somewhat intentional. But, when an art form is based on braggadocio and hyperbole—and prominently features (relatively) uneducated street dudes—sounding “cool” and “clever” is going to take precedent over “making sense.”

I’m not making any new revelations here. People who follow rap are generally aware that what I’m saying is true. But, while the concept and the awareness of this concept aren’t new, the pushback they’re beginning to receive is. Yes, rappers have always come under fire for their lyrics, but between Rick Ross’s date rape anthem, LL Cool J’s bizarre forgiveness of slavery, Lil Wayne’s reference to Emmett Till, and Nicki Minaj calling herself as a Republican, there have been at least four instances in the last six months where a throwaway lyric from a popular rapper became headline news.

Making this pushback even more unique is that it isn’t really coming from people like Dolores Tucker or Tipper Gore but actual fans of rap music.

At the moment, I’m somewhat ambivalent about this trend. While a part of me is encouraged to finally see rappers asked to answer for their lyrics, this criticism seems a little disingenuous, and raises more questions than it answers. For instance, why now? We’ve all heard worse and more socially irresponsible lyrics than the ones being criticized now, so where is this pushback coming from?

Also, when does it stop? If we took a fine-toothed comb and went through the catalogs of each and every one of the 100 or so most popular rappers—even “conscious” and (generally) socially palatable ones like Lupe Fiasco, Talib Kweli, and Common–with the goal of boycotting the ones with questionable lyrics and content, rap would be left with exactly zero rappers.

Lemme put it this way: Rappers like Rick Ross and Nicki Minaj are easy targets anyone with a blog and a petition board could hit with a blindfold; low-hanging, resume-building fruit. Taking shots at them will give you quick praise and easy co-signs among most educated Blacks and non-Blacks. But, if we’re going to do that, why not also go after Jay-Z for making half a billion dollars off of selling crack, writing music about selling crack, and writing more music about how he got rich from writing songs about selling crack? Or the Obamas for inviting him to the White House? If you’re going to boycott Lil Wayne, will you also delete every Wu, Biggie, Nas, Tupac, Snoop, and Kanye song from your iPod? Does Nicki Minaj really talk more shit than Lauryn Hill did?

Even everyone’s favorite rap band has a song with a couple lines that, if taken literally…

And when I’m breaking it off
Its no denying the fact it’s wrong
‘Cause you got a man who’s probably playing his part
You probably breaking his heart

“You want it gripped up, flipped, and thrown
And get stripped and shown, the way to get in the zone”

…would play out pretty much exactly like the oft-criticized rape scene in Temptation. 

Again though, I don’t necessarily think that it’s a bad thing that rappers are facing some heat now. Whether it’s music, words, or just energy, we all should be responsible and accountable for what we put out to the world, and artists are no different. But, a part of me looks at the type of rappers being called out—and the people doing most of the calling out (college educated writers and bloggers)—and can’t help but wonder if there’s some intellectual class bias going on here. Basically, “smart” rappers—or, more specifically, rappers “smart” people like—are generally immune, while rappers we’re not supposed to like or support seem to be the targets.

As Nas would say…

Jesus was born in a barn

“Blog” starts with the letter B

so does bitch, Bane, and HBCU

Y’all need to listen to me!!!

Nasspeak translation: I have a tendency to include some pretty racist and misogynistic nonsense in my raps. But, as long as it sounds “smart”—and as long as I make the occasional song about my daughter—it’s all good.

-–Damon Young (aka “The Champ”)

Damon Young

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB. He is also a contributing editor for EBONY.com. He resides in Pittsburgh, and he really likes pancakes.

  • nillalatte

    I’m different, yeah, I’m different.

    What dafuk is that song saying? Okay, I really don’t listen to the words in some songs as much as I just like the beat. Therefore, I can’t argue why lyrics make no sense.

    Oooooonnnnn the other hand, I found a site once that actually broke down the references to the lyrics, which I thought was rather interesting, especially others interpretation of them.

    • iamnotakata

      ” I really don’t listen to the words in some songs as much as I just like the beat.”

      This is me and really the only reason I can tolerate a lot of the f*ckery being put out in the name of music.

    • Malik

      “I don’t listen to the words.” LIES. If all these women didn’t allegedly listen to the words there would be a massive increase in instrumental sales among women consumers. Or at least a significant amount of the hip hop purchased by women would be instrumentals. Neither are true.

      • The Human Spider

        +1

        And may I add (as is always the case during these discussions) -> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgPcXeO4zn0

      • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

        Yep!

      • Rewind

        Exactly.

        Besides..if women don’t listen to the lyrics, then why the f*ck are they singing the lyrics on the dance floor, in their car or at the gym?

        I call shenanigans

      • http://earthtonescomic.com ActuallyBrown

        No rappers are going to put out an instrumental album. And producers don’t get enough face time to get marketed to that audience. The thing that makes rappers sell, even with garbage lyrics, is THE HOOK. There’s some point in the song where, in the club, the DJ can hit the fader, and EVERYBODY screams out the words.

        That is unfortunately the main reason why women listen to rap. A fu**ed up form of (comm)unity. Belonging, fitting in. Not seeming lame or behind. Being trendy–you get the point.

        • The Human Spider

          The thing that makes rappers sell, even with garbage lyrics, is THE HOOK. There’s some point in the song where, in the club, the DJ can hit the fader, and EVERYBODY screams out the words.

          This. As someone who has (randomly) practiced the art of turntablism (at the local Guitar Center), there’s a certain set of lyrics/the hook that may get repeated or faded out so that the crowd can repeat.

          • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

            Popped a molly i’m sweatin…..WOOOOO

            its all fun and games til the molly’s come out FOR REAL

        • Malik

          There are PLENTY of hip hop producers who make a ton of albums/eps/mixtapes comprised entirely of instrumentals. The fanbase for these artists is almost unilaterally 20:1. Even popular underground rappers like Jay Dee (RIP) don’t have a large women fanbase (as far as percentage goes). Whereas underground rappers who attempt to hit it big trying to replicate the same sort music mainstream rappers make have a ration closer to 1:1 of male and female listeners. Even many women rappers have majority male fans. They’re usually gay, but yeah.

          Fact is, women by and large listen to hip hop for hyper-masculine braggadocio and fun times. Not saying it’s good or bad. That’s just where most women rap fans began and end their journey at.

          • The Human Spider

            There are PLENTY of hip hop producers who make a ton of albums/eps/mixtapes comprised entirely of instrumentals. The fanbase for these artists is almost unilaterally 20:1. Even popular underground rappers like Jay Dee (RIP) don’t have a large women fanbase (as far as percentage goes).

            SAY. THAT. LOUDER.

            Seriously though, as a beatmaker, it’s a little more difficult gaining a fan base than it is for a rapper. Shoot, even a certain female on here thinks that (female) J Dilla are the norm rather than the exception…

          • Justmetheguy

            “Fact is, women by and large listen to hip hop for hyper-masculine braggadocio and fun times. Not saying it’s good or bad. That’s just where most women rap fans began and end their journey at.”

            Yep, and make sure you add the fact that quite a few of them are turned on by certain rappers and many of their lyrics. It makes navigating gender relations confusing for a lot of young men (and teenage boys). It’s like they’re getting two conflicting messages about women and what they like/want from men.

            • Malik

              Blu – “Like my ex used to bump Xzibit and her favorite line was/I be catching b*tches while b*tches be catching feelings/Yet she don’t want me tricking around/See, she idolize the lifestyle but don’t want none of it going down”

              Blu on Another Day. Obviously the mentality of mixed messages about what you enjoy in music to what you like listening to isn’t gender exclusive. It’s still a mixed message though and mixed messages will always confuse some amount of people.

              • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

                Honestly i’m just tired of the double standard. Even if it’s just entertainment.

                I guess i can call anybody a b!tch if i do it to a beat.

                I think the only problem is when it reanslates to real life. You hit the nail on the head bruh. Some ppl just can’t distingish the two. It’s a confusing double standard that’ll probably be around the ENTIRE lifespan of hip-hop. This conversation will be had 2,000,000 more times with same result.

                But if art reflects life, nothing’s gonna change until loves change.

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

              “Yep, and make sure you add the fact that quite a few of them are turned on by certain rappers and many of their lyrics.”

              Case in point? Plies, for example.

              • Brother Mouzone

                “Case in point? Plies, for example”

                THIS… In my DJ experience, I’ve found that Plies has WAAY more female fans than male. And it’s not just the ratchet females.

                • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

                  I haven’t seen any male Plies fans- and that’s not being facetious, by the way. I’m dead serious.

                • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

                  If you play any ratchet music in a club wit some educated women, they will have a BLAST.

                  It’s they only wanna be hood for 3 minutes at a time.

            • http://www.twitter.com/IluminatiNYC Todd

              With women, you just have to watch their actions, not their words. The key is to sell it as something other than it is. Women don’t like to put out their desires, hoping that a good man will be smart enough to serve her public and private needs.

              • http://obsidianraw.bravejournal.com Obsidian

                @Todd:
                Boom! One of the very first things Mystery says in his acclaimed Mystery Method is just this: Women do not and cannot be held accountable for their actions or desires. Just not wired that way. This accounts for why the vast majority of them won’t approach guys and so forth, to say nothing of what we’re talking about right now. The only thing guys can do to make a dent in things, is to simply, calmly, call the ladies on what they do versus what they say – and especially when they make a stink outta things like the Rick Ross controversy, et al. I’ll have more to say about that in today’s commentary below.

                Oh, and if Malik’s reading along, bravo! Well done.

                O.

          • http://earthtonescomic.com ActuallyBrown

            Fact is, women by and large listen to hip hop for hyper-masculine braggadocio and fun times.

            I don’t believe it. We need an experiment/large-scale-survey on this one. But who’s going to conduct it?

            • Malik

              If I could do the study, I’d do it. Get that grant money up etc. Unfortunately, at this point I only have anecdotal evidence and personal experience. This coming from someone who’s dated both a woman who was at hip hop manager at a time and real hip hop head. Most women in general aren’t out here to look for all this beauty and creativity and complexity that does exist within hip hop. They tryna shake that a** for a couple minutes.

              Women like beauty and complexity and ish in music as a whole just not hip hop. I mean even when you look at it as culture the only 1 of the 4 elements women really have embedded themselves into is dance.

              • Rewind

                If I had the money, I’d vote you to do it in a heartbeat, because you’re absolutely correct. The ratio of women who actually love hip-hop to the ones that just want to lose themselves to the music is like 1 to 15000 at times.

                • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

                  and i think there’s the conflict. Brothas listen to hip-hop cuz we can connect with as a whole, lyrics included. Even in soul music like Al Green, Marvin Gaye, etc. music has been another OUTLET of expression. For women it’s an OUTLET to shake that @$$. I ain’t mad at it tho. I just turn a deaf ear when people shake their asses to one song, and then protest another and they’re saying the same thing.

                  Ain’t nobody got time fuh dat

              • Brother Mouzone

                Women like beauty and complexity and ish in music as a whole just not hip hop. I mean even when you look at it as culture the only 1 of the 4 elements women really have embedded themselves into is dance”

                DAMN!!! Malik is bringin’ the pain today!!! Very astute observation my brother!

          • http://www.twitter.com/IluminatiNYC Todd

            Ain’t that the truth. Hetereosexual women tend to prefer traditional masculinity. Shocked. Next, we’ll find out water is indeed wet. LOL

          • The Guy Formerly Know As Hmmmm

            “Fact is, women by and large listen to hip hop for hyper-masculine braggadocio and fun times. Not saying it’s good or bad. That’s just where most women rap fans began and end their journey at.”

            One of many elephants in the room when discussing what’s wrong/right with Rap.

          • h.h.h.

            thank you for reminding me…i need to buy that Dr Dre – 2001 Instrumental album again.

            outside of Dilla tho, it’s very hard to find an all-instrumental CD.

            • Malik

              Que? Captain Murphy (aka Flying Lotus) dropped an all instrumental along with his music.

              Madlib has for like 20 years. So has his little brother Oh No. Karriem Riggins. Blu releases instrumentals. Exile. Blue Sky Black Death. Knxwledge. MF DOOM has a massive collection. Adrain Younge. and more and more and more.

              • h.h.h.

                Well now i have a start point…thanks

              • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

                Indeed! Hit up soundcloud too bro. Some of the best ish no one’s heard.

          • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

            “Fact is, women by and large listen to hip hop for hyper-masculine braggadocio and fun times. Not saying it’s good or bad. That’s just where most women rap fans began and end their journey at.”

            this is the great rap paradox

        • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

          ~ That is unfortunately the main reason why women listen to rap. A fu**ed up form of (comm)unity. Belonging, fitting in. Not seeming lame or behind. Being trendy–you get the point.

          i respectfully disagree. i cant speak for other women but for myself and my peoples ? mmm not even.

          • http://runningwithhumans.blogspot.com/ dimaati

            Don’t worry Esa. You’re not alone.

        • Joanna

          Plies has MASTERED the art of a catchy hook and basic songs on a tight beat. College matters.

      • Lia

        LOL why did it have to be a lie though? She said that she doesn’t listen to the words in “some songs”, not that she doesn’t listen to the lyrics in any songs…

        • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

          Because it’s impossible. You’re going to hear and RECOGNIZE an obscenity when it is said. Otherwise it wouldn’t be obscene, and this convo wouldn’t exist.

          • nillalatte

            WOW! All these comments. Here is what you GUYS don’t seem to get (about me anyways, a woman, which you should know) I HAVE SELECTIVE HEARING! I want to hear the beat, dance, but I don’t necessarily break down the lyrics to decide whether or not I like the beat!

            There are a lot of other songs that I can actually understand the lyrics AND like the beat.

            One comes to mind is Where is the Love by Black Eyed Peas. There were two others I thought of, but I have now forgotten. Not all rap are shyt for lyrics. :)

            • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

              you know you’re talking to a thread of GUYS about selective hearing, right? we all have that.

              you hear them, you just choose not to acknowledge them. nothing wrong with that, until it is.

      • http://pinchmycheekie.wordpress.com Cheekie

        “LIES. If all these women didn’t allegedly listen to the words there would be a massive increase in instrumental sales among women consumers. Or at least a significant amount of the hip hop purchased by women would be instrumentals. Neither are true.”

        I think it’s not so much that women (actually PEOPLE) don’t listen to the lyrics as much as they tune the lyrics out because they’re so hype by the beat. I’ve heard plenty of folks say how the lyrics of a song is stupid but they would dance to it at a club because the beat is hot. This concept ain’t new and I think that’s what nilla was getting at.

        • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

          I think it was understood madam Cheeks. But you haven’t lived until you heard a club full of HBCU grads yell out “POPPED A MOLLY, I’M SWEATIN” like a church choir. Them lyrics ain’t gettin tuned out.

          Kneegrows just don’t care. And that’s perfectly fine.

          • http://pinchmycheekie.wordpress.com Cheekie

            That’s kinda the point of tuning something out tho. Because they not looking deeply into the lyrics, they’re just singing them without caring to know the meaning. And I can wager mucho Monopoly dollars that bulk of the folks who sing about molly don’t actually do it. They’re singing it out of pure entertainment. Not because they condone it.

            Which is not a new concept in rap… especially not just because women are talking about it.

            • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

              I agree that it’s not a new concept. I’m just saying that in a certain environment, it’s pretty much understood that no one is serious. And to those people in that particular moment and mood, the meaning of whatever they’re saying is irrelevant, and would probably even subtract from the fun they’re having if they paid enough attention to it. That’s why conscious hip-hop isn’t played in the club really, because its not the time light incense. its time to shake your ass and set the serious aside.

        • nillalatte

          Thank you Ms. Cheekie. Well said.

      • Brother Mouzone

        +3

        • Brother Mouzone

          Meant for Malik’s comment

      • a boy and his demondog 06

        yep even if you’re not listening….you still hear it…music speaks to the soul

        • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

          yess ~*~

    • http://earthtonescomic.com ActuallyBrown

      You’re talking about Rap Genius (run by some non-urban dude-bro guys that are heavy into young rappers out today). The site has a lot of potential, but I’m not happy with their content team or there presumed philosophical angle.

      But “I really don’t listen to the words…I just like the beat” is the EPITOME of a female’s take on Rap. If it ain’t catchy or singy-songy, lyricism is lost on our female audience.

      Don’t tolerate it just because it’s catchy. Hold rappers accountable if you’re going to support them. And support them if they show that they are willing to be reasonably accountable (there’s room for art and expression, but dammit you have to be GOOD to earn your poetic license).

      • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

        “But “I really don’t listen to the words…I just like the beat” is the EPITOME of a female’s take on Rap. If it ain’t catchy or singy-songy, lyricism is lost on our female audience.”

        The problem is when you point that out, the denial becomes fairly strong…

        • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

          This is, PA, there is a reason a lot of women don’t listen to the lyrics. Those lyrics are constantly calling us out of our names. So, in order for those of us who party to enjoy ourselves we have learned to tune the lyrics out, otherwise we’d be miserable every time a rap song came on at said parties.

          • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

            Should be, ‘This is,”. Sorry I’m sleepy. Lol.

            • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

              Darn it! Should be, ‘Thing is.’.

              See. Lol.

              • The Human Spider

                Blame it on the Autocorrect. Always works. :)

                • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

                  I know, right. Lol.

                  • http://obsidianraw.bravejournal.com Obsidian

                    @Ms. Val,
                    No excuses. Chris Rock has spoken quite pointedly and eloquently about all this, and completely renders your argument null and void.

                    O.

          • Joy2urwrld

            +1

          • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

            Excuses, excuses. They say the same exact thing even if the song was positive- which they have on countless occasions.

          • http://earthtonescomic.com ActuallyBrown

            You can change that. You have the power to change what DJ’s play. The only reason they play what they do is because girls come out to dance to that nonsense. It’s gonna take an Occupy Wall Street-level effort, but women need to raise their expectations of club music.

            Request more Common & Talib et al. The more often it happens, the more DJ’s have to alter their playlists to keep the patrons happy….because patrons buy alcohol, and make the club money…money that pays the DJ ultimately….

            • Kema

              Common and Talib need to get their beats from wherever rick Ross and 2 chainz gets theirs and sound just as animated when rhyming. But then again maybe we do like ignorant music when in the club. After all the club is the one place we can do hoodrat stuff with our friends. I can’t do my ‘mating dance’ to conscious rap.

              • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

                ~ I can’t do my ‘mating dance’ to conscious rap.

                (giggle)

                i’ve done it to just about any kinda music but there’s so weird truth about lowly music right here ..

              • http://obsidianraw.bravejournal.com Obsidian

                @Ms. Kema:
                Coolbeans – but then you can’t expect any Brotha to take any Woman seriously who gets their back up when Rick Ross says what is fully expected of a…

                wait for it…

                Rick Ross.

                Pretty simple. Guys tend to like logical consistency. Anything else, is BS.

                With all due respect.

                O.

                • Sweet GA Brown

                  All I know is I like to enjoy myself when I go out and dance however I see fit and I imagine that a guy would be attracted to me because Im enjoying myself rather than standing off to the side trying to come off approachable.

                  • The Guy Formerly Know As Hmmmm

                    That sounds fair. But do you complain openly about misogyny in rap lyrics?

                    • http://obsidianraw.bravejournal.com Obsidian

                      Boom!

                      O.

                    • mena

                      I personally don’t know any black women who do. It’s just simply accepted.

                    • Sweet GA Brown

                      No I don’t. So no “boom” there O.
                      I sing right along.

                • a boy and his demondog 06

                  i’m reminded of when all of those spellman gals were in a huff over nelly’s tip drill…i promise you though, that whenever that song comes on, it wasn’t dudes crowding the dance floor and bustin it wide open….

              • Sweet GA Brown

                Lol +100

              • Sahel

                Dedicates whisper song and salt shaker to Kema

                • Kema

                  OMG!! Those were my fave!!!

            • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

              i dont know. i think it is poor form to make requests of the DJ. they are artists. i dont interrupt. nor do i seek to change their style. let them live, thas their world.

              i think, if women want conscious music, they’ll go to the shows. Tools of War. Rock Steady Reunion. Zulu Nation Anniversary. DMC Finals. Battle of the Year. etc. it happens every year.

              it’s a small world. there’s always young girls, old girls, and not a lot of em but trust, it’s an inter-generatonal scene.

              • http://obsidianraw.bravejournal.com Obsidian

                @Ms. Esa,
                I’ve been quietly been checking out you work, both here at VSB and your own blog, etc, and have an appreciation for what you’re about in a general sense, so I’m going to pay you the compliment of being blunt.

                You know and I know that all those gatherings you mentioned are but grains of sand on the beach when compared to the kinds of rappers Chris Rock so famously discussed. You know it. In fact, you know there are Black Women, right in this very forum, who far and away are in the pile Chris Rock discussed, than the gatherings you mentioned.

                So let’s be brutally, utterly frank.

                Again: I have no problem whatsoever with who or what any Black Women chooses to share her resources with (which includes her time). What I have a ginormous problem with, is their hypocrisy – they clearly support, to the tune of millions, the very kinds of rappers who can be fully expected to do the things they do, but these Black Women suddenly are so very outraged. Ha! What. A. Joke!

                I know of exactly the kinds of events you’re talking about, and in fact have attended a few, and I can say firsthand that it is as I’ve noted in this comment.

                It’s real simple: where you put your time and resources, is what you ultimately value. And when it comes to Hip Hop, Black Women value the varieties of it that Chris Rock talked about, in the main.

                End of.

                O.

                • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

                  ~ You know and I know that all those gatherings you mentioned are but grains of sand on the beach ..

                  you put poetic imagery in my head .. a Tao verse escapes me at the moment.

                  ~ Women suddenly are so very outraged. Ha! What. A. Joke!

                  i am going to leave race out of this. it’s a Woman’s issue. i respect that.

                  on the flip, i recognize inconsistency as my birthright (giggle) ohh well ~*~

                  men dont like it. i know. i try to remember this, to think outside of myself.

                  ~ where you put your time and resources, is what you ultimately value.

                  YES. one hundred percent.

              • h.h.h.

                “i dont know. i think it is poor form to make requests of the DJ. ”

                at clubs, yes. (as a DJ, that was the most annoying part, when people come up to ask for a song that doesn’t go into a set)

                at certain … ah…posh..events? more likely.

                • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

                  i am sayinn :: anywhere ~

                  my boy spins records in his house. i’m there to take it in, not tell him what i want to hear. thas soo ..

                  boring.

                • Kema

                  Hah! I will make a request every time I go to the club. My request? Reggae! I’m in VA… If I dont request sometimes they leave it out. I need to Bruk it Down!

          • Charlie

            I dont think they are talking about you. And most likely not anyone you know.

            • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

              That’s the Snoop Dogg/ Russell Simmons defense.

              • Charlie

                Whoever defense it is doesn’t change that fact that its true. Im pretty sure rappers get behinds thrown at them by girls we call hoes, all the time. Why cant they rap about it? And when they do why do you assume its about you, or women in general, specifically black women?

                • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

                  Because they use words like b*tch and h*e as pejoratives rather than relating to specific women.

                  Your argument is like saying that when White racists talk about ‘the ni**ers’ they aren’t talking about all Black people so why let it bother you.

                  • Charlie

                    I don’t think they remember or even try to remember those girls names, but even if they did, why should they have to name names to make you feel sure that they are not talking about you or all women? And if a white racist is running around calling some black people n**gers, knowing the history behind it, just shows me his character. Because regular white people dont run to that word as a first response when a black person makes them mad.But B**ch and H*e are the first words many use when describing women who behave a certain way.

                  • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

                    It constantly amazes me how some men completely get racism but don’t understand the impact of misogyny.

                    • Charlie

                      im a girl.

                    • Kema

                      @Charlie… can you seriously not see the similarity in n*ggerbeing the go to word for blacksand b*tch or h*e being the go to phase to describe women? Yes regular whitesdont use the n-word. But that wasn’t until it was deemed wrong.

                    • http://www.twitter.com/mcnairian5 McNairian

                      Because we’ve been “misogynized”…male and female…the party never gets Crunk until you play the ignance; guess who knows all those lyrics? Guess who buys that because all the females are singing along?

                  • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

                    Oops, sorry. But, that just makes your defense of those lyrics even more problematic.

                    • Charlie

                      Your reason for being mad doesn’t make sense. Argh so
                      tiny.

              • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

                Mad? Who said I was mad. We just disagree.

                • Charlie

                  I paraphrased due to space; didn’t mean it in a you being angry way. But still dont understand why you personally take offence to what rappers deal with. Oh well, we’ll just have to disagree then.

          • Rewind

            I don’t know if I can agree with that Val. The lyrics, when talking about women, are for two kinds of women: ho’s, the chicks that wait for rappers after the show and bang the whole clique just to say she chilled with so & so, and end up doing all sorts of scandelous sh-it just to get some fame; and then regular ladies, when the songs are about love or making a girl #1.

            You’ll always know the difference between the two when you hear the lyrics. To say that since Ja Rule is saying Ginger the secretary is his “Down Ass B*tch” or Tyga is talking about Lucy at NYU in Rack City is really crazy because those songs aint about them in the least bit. One is about a thug chick who wants to be down for her thug, and the other is about strippers.

            You know the difference between Lil Wayne’s “How To Love” and “Good Kush” songs and how he’s talking about women in those songs…so we can’t let that excuse slide.

            • Sweet GA Brown

              I agree. I listen to the songs and say the words and I know they aren’t talking about me as an individual. I dont feel bad or like I’m disrespecting the next chick. Im singing a song and not speaking it into my existence. I understnad that there are a lot of ppl that can’t differentiate between what is their life and what is the songwriters song but thats their problem. I am what I believe I am. F@ck all that other mess.

              • Rewind

                That’s all I’m saying.

                If I sing lyrics to any song, 98% of the time, those lyrics don’t have a damn thing to do with my life. That doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy them. But unless I feel like my life is being described, I will never see a reason to be offended.

                In fact, the only time rap offends is the enormous amounts of songs that involves rappers saying “I’m smashing your chick”, and that irks me a bit because…THEY ARE NOT LYING. All the chicks they bang…some of those chicks got boyfriends, husbands, lovers, etc…yet they go out their way to smash a rapper, and end up as a subject for his next song involving his d*ck.

                • Sweet GA Brown

                  Lol. You have a point and those songs dont offend me either…because I’m a female. Ha!

          • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

            Val, you lyin.

      • That Ugly Kid

        Don’t tolerate it just because it’s catchy. Hold rappers accountable if you’re going to support them.

        But see, here’s the thing, who are YOU to tell someone how they should enjoy a song? If they like catchy, sing-songy rap, oh well. That’s their choice.

        • http://earthtonescomic.com ActuallyBrown

          I’m just a guy…but I rap as well. It pains me to know that the demographic I would like tends to lean away from me because I don’t pander. I can make that stuff, but not exclusively. Music as Art is not intended to be static. It evolves as the Artist does, as the person behind the art grows and has new experiences.

          Who am I? I’m a progressive human being. I’m somebody that wants to grow throughout my life, and somebody that wants my brothers and sisters to grow with me. If they stagnate, then I find myself alone on the far turn of the racetrack. That’s no fun, not for a racer, not for a person with desires of companionship (as all people have), and not for an artist that’s experimenting with his or her craft.

          I think that ‘who are YOU’ attitude is really deferring the cultural conversation we should be having with each other about being a more progressive people. We’re stuck in more ways than one, and music is SO INFLUENTIAL and instrumental in our culture that it is critical we uplift those creating art that strives to incite thought and a full range of emotions, and downplay those creating ‘whatever’s hot right now’.

          • Charlie

            We do “uplift those creating art that strives to incite thought and a full range of emotions” when we like how it sounds, with the message as a cherry on top, but nobody is thinking about that in the club. Sure there are artist who have found a balance in mixing pop with message, but that is still a cherry on top. If is sounds good without making us too uncomfortable… we dance.

          • That Ugly Kid

            Music is a form of enterntainment. Period. It doesn’t have to uplift, nor does it have to have deep messages, or bring forth a range of emotions. CAN music do this? Yes. Does it HAVE to? No. Not at all. If people enjoy listening to catchy hooks and loud, rambunctious beats, that’s their choice. It doesn’t make them wrong, nor does it mean they have poor tastes.

            • http://lifeloveandsuch.wordpress.com CBRADIO82

              +1

            • nillalatte

              Momma luvs you TUK. Muwah. Thank you.

      • Yonnie

        I feel about her the way she feels about music. She’s cute. She don’t like the words, she just like the beat and I’m thinking “me too.”

        ~ Everybody’s favorite a$$hole, Joe Budden

        • SankofaLady

          LOL

          Perfect timing

    • http://www.twitter.com/IluminatiNYC Todd

      Nilla, with that last paragraph, you’re likely thinking of RapGenius.com. It’s a great site. Their breakdown of “My Downfall” by Notorious B.I.G. was poignant, and I appreciated it.

      • http://lifeloveandsuch.wordpress.com CBRADIO82

        Check their breakdown of Frank Ocean’s “Pyramids”…

        • https://www.facebook.com/Aisha.Taylor.Lewis Scarlet

          Love the song (& Channel Orange overall). I’ll have to check out the site.

    • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

      LOL, I hate this d@mn song with a passion.

      • Sweet GA Brown

        I like that song because he is basically letting everybody know that he is doing his own thing. He is an individual and he doesnt care if ppl get him or not.

        • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

          Besides the inane lyrics, I think what annoys be so much is that he scream he’s different while being so much the same. I don’t know if he’s trying to be ironic or not. 2Chanins may be some kind of evil genius.

          • Sweet GA Brown

            He just may be.

  • iamnotakata

    Its funny you posted about dumb sh!t rappers say, because there was controversy stirring earlier today about some dumb sh!t Asap Rocky regular as$ had to say about women of color and cosmetics.

    This is what was so “eloquently” stated.

    “But for real, for me, I feel like with the red lipstick thing it all depends on the pair of complexion. I’m just being for real. You have to be fair skinned to get away with that. Just like if you were to wear like—f-cking for instance, what do dark skin girls have that you know fair skinned girls can’t do… Purple lipstick? Naw, that looks stupid on all girls!”

    I personally think he is a trapped in the closet coon.

    • Malik

      Coon? Seriously? Alright.

    • msdebbs

      Asap Rocky needs to take several \_ \_\_ the last thing he should be doing is giving advice about fashion and make up…..who wears braids in 2013??

      • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

        Not even braid but plaits. Lol

        • Sweet GA Brown

          Lol. Reminds me of Inkwell.

      • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

        Rocky was on the cover of the March issue of L’Uomo Vogue. the industry is starting to take him very seriously ..

        • Malik

          Modeled as part of Hood By Air as well.

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      I don’t think I’m cool enough to “get” asap rocky

    • h.h.h.

      maybe…and this is just me throwing out an idea…but maybe the concept of super bright red lipstick on most black women…isn’t his cup of tea? not sure how that makes him a closet c**n.

      but then again, i agree in the sense that excessive lipstick just looks like you had a session with a Crayola box…but i’m pacquiao’d.

  • The Human Spider

    Because rap has become a genre of music to market, and these rappers are in the public light. When Biggie made reference to the exploits of Gudda and DMX and Cam made rape a threat (openly, and using the word), rap was still treading waters in the mainstream. But this is all my opinion.

    Not helping Weezy, Minaj and Ross’s case is the fact that a percentage of people believe they are not talented. As a matter of fact, Nas & Jay did a song titled…wait for it…Black Republican. Very little smoke from an even smaller fire, at least around my way.

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

      “As a matter of fact, Nas & Jay did a song titled…wait for it…Black Republican. Very little smoke from an even smaller fire, at least around my way.”

      Probably because the song was garbage, LMAO!!

      • The Human Spider

        LIES! Jigga danced for 90 seconds at the beginning of his verse instead of going in. LOL

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

          …And that’s where he f*cked up, LMAO!!

        • Sweet GA Brown

          Did he do a jig?

          • The Human Spider

            I think it was a two-step.

  • http://www.iamyourpeople.com I Am Your People

    I totally forgive Brad Paisley for this bullisht – he’s a white man from West Virginia (a Union State *deep sigh*) with no Black friends. But why is the Black man from Queens, NY co-signing this?

    Is Canibus going to drop a dis track? Cuzhhe finally won

    • The Other Jerome

      I’m afraid not. Canibus’ free style fail is > LL’s if you forgive my do-rag, i’ll forgive you wearing a “SLAVERY/ RAPE AND GENERAL HOLOCAUST FOR BLACK PEOPLE” symbol.

      It’s cool. LL meant well :-/

      ….. ok maybe they’re equal……

    • http://stanoffewwords.wordpress.com Tristan

      HE’S JUST A WHITE MAAAAN

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

      ll has no facial hair, and we all know you can’t trust a black man with no facial hair

      • IcePrincess3

        Looooool pretty much

  • That Ugly Kid

    Eh, all of this attention over these past few months led me to ask a different question. Despite the fact that irresponsible and questionable lyrics can be found in almost any genre, why is it that rap is the only genre being targeted?

    And no, this song “Accidental Racist” does not count as an example of people targeting a genre other than rap. People are clowning this song because it is hilariously, offensively, bad.

    • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

      There have been plenty of occasions when rock lyrics have been called out. So, it’s not just rap.

      • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

        Country lyrics too.

        • Yonnie

          I’ve NEVER heard of a controversy over country lyrics. People say in general (usually jokingly) that “country is about alcoholism & women beating,” but like a specific lyric in a specific song? Nawl.

          • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

            “but like a specific lyric in a specific song? Nawl.”

            “I shot a man in Reno, just to watch him die”

            -“Folsom Prison Blues”, Johnny Cash

            “We’ll put a boot in your ass, that’s the American way”

            -“Courtesy Of The Red, White & Blue”, Toby Keith

      • That Ugly Kid

        Not NEARLY to the degree rap has been called out on since its huge surge back in the 90’s.

        • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

          Since it’s surge, yeah, rap is incredibly popular so of course it’s called out more now but, look at the history of rock and you’ll see the same protest or even worse happened regarding that genres lyrics and persona.

          • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

            It’s should be ‘its’.

          • That Ugly Kid

            Except rap has been protested against for over two decades straight, pretty much non stop. Protests of Rock lyrics happen in spurts. Being protested here and there. Nowhere near the massive media outcry rap has been the target of for a little over a score now.

            • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

              Read my reply to PA. Rock protests have been going on since the 50’s, TUK.

              • That Ugly Kid

                Yes, but as I said, it’s been happening in spurts. Rap has been consistently attacked, nonstop, since the surge of the 90s. Rock hasn’t. Sure it’s been attacked during certain notable periods (i.e the 70s), but it has never seen the ongoing attack and villification rap has seen (on a mass media scale) since it was recognized as a genre. The closest genre to get that same unrelenting heat, was heavy metal. But even nowadays, you don’t hear nearly as much outcry over that genre’s lyrics as you do with rap, despite it and other genres having similar lyrical content.

                • IcePrincess3

                  It’s not that complicated TUK. Whatever music is most popular, is the main target. Duh. In it’s heyday, Rock/metal used to catch all types of hell. The lyrics hit blamed for inciting violence, devil worship, you name it. 20 yrs later, rap/hip hop is now pretty much the music of the whole world. When you on top, drama comes with the territory.

                  • That Ugly Kid

                    Except, that’s not the case. Most of the people complaining about rap don’t actually listen to rap. They catch wind of a irresponsible lyric and then make a fuss about. Rap is not the most popular genre out. Pop/dance music is BY FAR the most popular genre out right now. Justin Timberlake’s album almost hit 1 million records sold in the first week. Lady Gaga’s last album actually acheived this. As well as Taylor Swift’s. So you’re wrong.

                    • IcePrincess3

                      “you’re wrong.” Two words NEVER to say to a woman! Lmao :-)

                    • Rewind

                      Most of the people complaining about censoring rock in the 80s didn’t listen to rock either. Your point aint hitting much because all this stuff goes in spades. In less than 10 years, the new music to hate will be electronica because heavy drug use will be associated with it.

                  • The Guy Formerly Know As Hmmmm

                    Jazz got it too when it was the popular music.

        • nillalatte

          90’s?! Damn. You do a disservice to the pioneers of rap, dear. Back when folks really created amazing lyrics… it’s like that & that’s the way it is!

      • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

        Yeah, when it comes to Satanic messages or suicide- and that’s about it…

        • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

          Don’t forget rock was seen as advocating drug use from the 60’s on. And, if you go back even further to the 1950’s, PA, rock was vilified as being overtly sexual and promoting promiscuity.

          • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

            You know why? Here’s why:

            The primary reason was that Rock & roll was at one point a Black artform (Shocking, I know…). The reason why those claims were leveled at the genre were based on their fear of people of color. You see, the problem was they thought the music or the lyrical content would be corruptive to impressionable White minds (Sound familiar?). So the claims made against rock had less to do with the music itself and more to do with the race of the people actually doing the music. If you notice, the claims and criticisms died down when rock & roll became rather…uh…melanin challenged, shall we say?

            • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

              That’s all true, PA. My point was just that, for whatever reasons, rock has been the subject of protests for the last 50 years or more.

              • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

                However, the protests have not been as consistent and extensive as they are on hip hop. Most of that has to do with the genre having 70% of its sales from suburban kids buying music that’s by and large a mostly Black artform.

                If and when hip hop gets overtaken by White people, I assure you the attacks and criticisms will die down.

    • Malik

      even white people who barely believe racism exists were clowning this song.

    • Never

      I think Buju (free up!), Capleton, Sizzla, Shabba, Beenie Man, Bounty Killer, Elephant Man, and Vybz Kartel (free World Boss same way) would disagree with the notion that hip hop is the only genre being targeted.

      • The Human Spider

        I’m positive that the reggae/dancehall genre is under fire too, especially after seeing this:

        (NSFW!)http://www.worldstarhiphop.com/videos/video.php?v=wshheU0zEO7YVDeR6WmV(NSFW!)

        Problem is reggae/dancehall seems to fluctuate in and out of the mainstream as opposed to the mainstay that is Rap.

        (P.S. I warned you that link was not safe for work.)

        • Never

          Hmmm. That’s fairly tame by our standards; I honestly thought this was going to be the video about the homosexual set aflame in Montego Bay. And fair enough – I’m doubtless more highly attuned to the protests/criticisms courtesy Outrage! and similar interest groups considering I listen to…probably 98.73% dancehall/reggae. Can’t forget that hip hop is FAR more popular than dancehall is in the United States. Once hip hop became big business…well…

        • minxbrie

          1. Jamaica NEEDS to invest in a gymnastics team. We could KILL IT on floor and beam.

          2. Dancehall gets away with it because 90% of the time, NO ONE understands what they’re saying. People stay saying that they can talk patois and then look confused when I’m laughing when they ask if my pum pum is tun up…

          • msdebbs

            +1

          • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

            “if my pum pum is tun up…”

            well, is it?

            (I have no idea what that means, btw)

            • IcePrincess3

              Da hell u don’t ;-)

            • https://www.facebook.com/Aisha.Taylor.Lewis Scarlet

              LMAO @ your face when you find out what you just asked her! 😵😂😭

      • That Ugly Kid

        It is the only genre receiving massive mainstream criticism. Dancehall is now wellknown enough in mainstream America so it doesn’t count, as it doesn’t garner nearly the same amount of attention.

        • Never

          Point is that hip hop isn’t the only genre targeted (considering work visas now get mysteriously revoked; concert tours get canceled; artists are repeatedly importuned to sign hilarious oaths).

          Dancehall doesn’t garner the same attention…because it isn’t well known “enough” in mainstream America. I’ll bet dollars to donuts that less than 10% of the participants on this forum have heard of Chan Dizzy, Fire Links, Foota Hype, Chronixx, I-Octane, Khago, Aidonia – worse “mainstream America.”

          • minxbrie

            We can agree to disagree.

            But I stand behind the reason why it doesn’t appear to garner as much criticism is because people can’t understand what they’re saying, it just sounds good and you can dance to it.

            I mean, this could also be considered an identity difference as well. (Identity? Cultural? I can’t decide which one would be more appropriate)

            Hip hop and rap came out of Black America so of course it’s more likely to come under fire by critics. Dancehall/Reggae is from the Caribbean and if anyone believes the stereotype, it’s a bunch of weed-smoking, pleasant Bob Marley-type dreads. It just doesn’t matter in the same way if they never play Vybz Kartel on the radio compared to if Rick Ross is boycotted.

            • Never

              I think something got lost somewhere. I was simply pointing out (two responses up) that hip hop isn’t the only genre targeted, and expounded on the difference in attention that each genre receives – my response wasn’t explicitly disagreeing with yours.

              Of course dancehall isn’t as popular because of the patois barrier, and for those who are adventurous enough to learn the basics – wah gwan, breddren, sistren, desso, yasso – they’ll struggle mightily when they haven’t any context (creech, jimbelin, patoo, panganat, peeny-wally, galliwasp, bandulu, tun up lol). This is precisely why Bob Marley eschewed the use of heavy patois.

              Yet recall there are, ahm, some of “those” who willingly translate the lyrics for higher ups. Not sure how old you are, but this is why Buju’s work visa was initially pushed back several times prior getting finally approved – back during Stamina Daddy days.

              • minxbrie

                No I wasn’t disagreeing with you. I was merely commenting to TUK that the reason the criticism may not be as prominent because it doesn’t matter the same way that it does in the States when it comes to rap music. So the minor attack on Rick Ross is much more important than refusing to let Buju enter the country.

                I mean, I’m always surprised if any Jamaican artist is allowed in North America, Beenie Man was in my town last summer for a club performance and the first thing my cousin says, “Is how him manage fi get a visa fi enta dis ya country?”

                • Rewind

                  Then you need to come to NY when we have the West Indian Day parade and On The Reggae Tip Concert afterwards. All of them dancehall artists come out in full swing.

                  • minxbrie

                    WEST INDIAN DAY PARADE?!

                    I’m laughing. I’m trying not to, but I’m laughing.

                    Is that like the US version of Carnival?!

          • That Ugly Kid

            That wasn’t MY point though. Which was that rap seems to be, on a mainstream scale, the only genre continuously targeted. The fact that Dancehall isn’t anywhere as mainstream as rap (in the U.S.) automatically eliminates it from the discussion.

            • Ms. Bridget

              I think people are replying to your original point…<blockquote)Despite the fact that irresponsible and questionable lyrics can be found in almost any genre, why is it that rap is the ONLY genre being targeted?

    • SweetSass

      Hard/Grunge/Deathmetal Rock gets it’s share of ire.

      Punk gets associated with white supremacy a lot too.

      Anytime a crazy white kid shoots up his school they blame Marilyn Manson.

  • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

    If Uncle L and this Paisley guy really wanted to accomplish something (racially) positive they should have just sat down with Lady Antebellum and explained to them why their name is overtly racist and bigoted and disgusting.

    Oh and regarding Nicki Minaj; forget the Republican crap. Her claim to rapper’s stupidity hall of fame is her song, “Stupid H*e”.

    • Rewind

      You seriously hate that song don’t you

      • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

        Have you ever read the lyrics to that song? Yeah, I hate the message for sure.

        http://youtube.com/watch?v=IaC-zCMLTKU

        • Rewind

          I don’t like any of her songs, but that is consistently the one thing you’ve mentioned hating for all these past months.

          I’m not knocking you though, she deserves every second of the hate.

    • The Other Jerome

      But that song is catchy :-(

      • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

        Lol. So is “Sweet Home Alabama”. Hell, that idiot Ruben Studdard even sang it on AI back in the day. But, the song is still offensive.

        • The Other Jerome

          Didn’t Ruben apologize for that….. back in 2004 when he asked for a pass for the whole year?

          I want to play that card next time i get into trouble!

          • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

            Did he apologize? Wow, I missed that. I guess I can give him half a credit for that.

            • The Other Jerome

              Well he apologized for all of 2004 lol. So uh, i’m assuming that was included :-)

              • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

                Ha. Ha.

              • http://verysmartbrothas.com The Champ

                Well he apologized for all of 2004 lol. So uh, i’m assuming that was included

                LOL

            • Joy2urwrld

              Lol he’s taking about the song “Sorry for 2004″.

              • Joy2urwrld

                *talking

              • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

                Yeah, I figured that out but, I guess it took me a little longer than it should have.

        • Joanna

          Why is Sweet Home Alabama offensive? I must be missing something lol

          • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

            The song isn’t really offensive, but Lynyrd Skynyrd have been known to wave the Confederate Fag at their concerts as well as wear it on their shirts.

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

              Oops, that supposed to be “Flag”!

              • SweetSass

                I heard they have not done that recently… distanced themselves from the flag.

                • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

                  Probably because it’s not the original lineup. When the song was released, they had a field day with it.

          • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

            The song was defending Southern Whites just after the Civil Rights movement. It’s saying that they are who they are and they have a right to treat Black people like they did because it was apart of their heritage.

            Also, check out Neil Young’s song “Southern Man” which is a reply to “Sweet Home Alabama”.

            • Joanna

              Great song!

            • 1heathen

              Actually, its the other way around. Lynyrd Skynyrd’ Sweet Home Alabama is in reaction to Neil Young’s song. They even mention Neil Young’s “Southern Man” in the lyrics and tell him to mind his own business and leave a southern man alone.

              • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

                Yep, you’re right, 1heathen.

    • https://www.facebook.com/Aisha.Taylor.Lewis Scarlet

      When they first came out, I wondered if the meaning of “antebellum” had changed…

      • Joanna

        Antebellum, regardless of connotations, mean before the Civil War.

        • https://www.facebook.com/Aisha.Taylor.Lewis Scarlet

          I know. I was being facetious. ☺

          • Joanna

            lol oops–completely went over my head!

  • Rewind

    You look so good/I suck on your daddy’s d*ck – Notorious B.I.G.

    Yea you might have more cash than me/but you aint got the skills to eat a n*gga’s ass like me – Cannibus

    Yup…rappers say dumb sh-it. But we tend to let it slide because that dumb sh-it is surrounded by 2 minutes of either decent, intelligent or so stupid you need to stop thinking lyrical content.

    You pick and choose your battles. Rappers make stupid lyrics, but in all seriousness, musicians period make dumb songs. From Janis Jopelin to the Doors to the Ramones to AC/DC. From Al B. Sure to Bobby Brown to Brian McKnight, you can find a dumb lyric in quite a few of their songs.

    • The Other Jerome

      “You look so good/I suck on your daddy’s d*ck – Notorious B.I.G.”

      You know, that lyric made me pause like the second time i heard it. Which then lead to my belief that Pac won :-)

      • Rewind

        DEAD.

        Dude…B.I.G is my favorite rapper, but he is so lucky he existed before the “No Homo”era because quite a few of his lyrics are beyond questionable.

        • Never

          That and R. Kelly’s dubious phrasing in “I’m Forking You Tonight.”

          “…B.I.G., bring that @ss to meeee…”

          Man…commas can be the bane of well-intentioned lyrics. Beenie Man still has nightmares whenever someone sings “how can I make love to a fella in rush? Pass me the keys to my truck…”

          • Rewind

            Everytime that part comes up, I have to stop singing, because I’m like Kelly…..really?

            But it only took a few more years to understand he probably meant that sh*t

        • Yonnie

          I think about this every time I listen to Beef:

          “Hope they know my ni@@a Gutter fu$%in kidnap kids. Fu$% ‘em in the a$$, throw ‘em over the bridge.

          Fam. WHAT?!

          • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

            That’s the same thing I said when I heard it.

            • http://www.alltherightquestions.com T.Q. Fuego

              I was p!ssed when I heard that lyric but one of my sisters did her best to justify it “Maybe that’s just his reality in the part of Nee York he comes from.” You should’ve seen the look I gave her. There’s a difference between talking about a heinous reality and bragging about it or using it to threaten someone.

              • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

                Unfortunately, that practice was commonplace for the mob in New York at the time…and you know how much Bigggie loved the mafia life.

    • minxbrie

      “Sure to Bobby Brown to Brian McKnight, you can find a dumb lyric in quite a few of their songs.”

      Remember Brian McKnight’s “If You’re Ready to Learn” from last April?

      “Let me show you how your p—y works/Since you didn’t bring it to me first.”

      I feel like stupid lyrics happen. If I can dance to it, I’ll take it. Nicki’s got me humming to High School lately and I’ve just learned to forgive myself for her foolishness.

      • Rewind

        We’ve all learned to ignore stupid lyrics, but there always comes that moment when one day the song plays and you’re like “I seriously f*cking like this song?”

        • minxbrie

          As Chris Rock once said, “If the beats alright, she will dance ALL.NIGHT.”

          There’s a lot of questionable musicians out there but I feel like music has always been this way – if people can move to it, they’re not really going to complain until a line is crossed (typically in ermm… “ethnic” music. Can I say ethnic? I’m trying out new terms)

          I’m in the midst of choreographing to Rihanna’s Pour It Up and it’s a HORRIBLE song. But I can’t stop listening to it.

          And I mean, if you want REALLY offensive music, put on a dancehall CD. My friends have just started understanding patois so they’ve just discovered how bad it is. I’ve always known. I do not care.

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

      “From Janis Jopelin to the Doors to the Ramones to AC/DC. From Al B. Sure to Bobby Brown to Brian McKnight, you can find a dumb lyric in quite a few of their songs.”

      Oddly enough, the rock and R&B fans would get downright hostile if you even thought about bringing this point up- no matter how truthful it happens to be.

      Although I’m a huge AC?DC fan, there’s not a world of difference between their lyrics and R. Kelly’s lyrics. Their song “Love At First Feel” could have easily been an R. Kelly song, just based on the subject matter alone.

      *shots fired*

      • The Other Jerome

        I’m sorry, “R” has a song called “I like the crotch on you” from the 12 play album. I don’t think AC/DC can top that…… no one can!

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

          I still can’t believe he actually wrote songs called “Feelin’ On Your Booty” and “Sex In The Kitchen” and his fans treat it as if he was Burt Bacharach, LMAO!

          • AfroPetite

            lol Chex in the kitchen ova by da stoveeeeeeeeeeeee

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

              By the buttered rolls, LMAO!!!

              • Sweet GA Brown

                Thats song didnt get me randy. It made me hungry.

                • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

                  *side eyes Sweet GA Brown*

          • Yonnie

            Booga-boooga-boooga-boo-teeeeeee

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

              *Muttley snicker*

          • Brother Mouzone

            I still can’t believe he actually wrote songs called “Feelin’ On Your Booty” and “Sex In The Kitchen” and his fans treat it as if he was Burt Bacharach, LMAO!

            This sh*t made me ROTFL!

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

              You know I’m telling the truth, man! His fans are dedicated, I’ll tell you that, LOL!

      • Rewind

        If you think about all the metal songs from the 80s, I get a distinct feeling that’s where rappers got their inspiration for stupid lyrics.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

          Pretty much. There’s not much difference between today’s hip hop and the hair metal of the 80’s. The names and faces have changed, but it’s practically the same thing.

  • Joy2urwrld

    I think we often suffer a bit of amnesia when it comes to controversy. I saw a tweet claiming that everyone is upset about Rick Ross’s rape lyric, but nobody said a word when Nelly swiped a credit card down the crack of a woman’s behind during the Tip Drill video. Ignoring the fact that these two things are not even comparable, dude was wrong. There WAS outrage when the Tip Drill lyrics came out. Spelman College had a huge protest when Tip Drill came out. There was also outrage when NWA was popular. Didn’t rap have a hand in Tipper Gore’s music rating crusade? So none of this is new. There was outrage back in the day and there is outrage now. I think the biggest difference between then and now is the social media impact. Social media gets more people involved in the conversation and makes everything feel bigger than it used to. I really don’t get this post because I believe all the conversations provoked by these lyrics are necessary and helpful.

    • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

      C. Dolores Tucker is smiling right now and saying I told you so.

      • The Other Jerome

        As an official Tupac stan, i’m technically obligated to inform you that it’s likely difficult for her to smile……. in hell :-)

        An outrage profiteer if their ever was one…….

        • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

          “An outrage profiteer if their ever was one…….”

          It just seems that way because she was ahead of her time, protest wise.

          • The Other Jerome

            Val…. come on. Need i mention the lawsuit because Pac ruined her sex life?!? Stop lol

            • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

              Lol!

    • The Human Spider

      I’ve taken it as people (on my timeline) were more aggravated with the “apologies” that came from Ross AFTER the lyric was discovered than they were the actual lyric itself. This is just my interpretation.

      • Joy2urwrld

        Probably because his apology was ridiculous. He claimed that people took offense because of a misinterpretation of his,lyrics. He described a text book example of date rape in his song, there was no misinterpretation. I think the real issue is that Ross doesn’t consider date rape to be rape.

        • The Other Jerome

          Bingo!

        • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

          i dont think he apologized. i think he gave the best non-answer ever and deaded any responsibility he had. it was a page from the Warhol play book. we know less than we thought we did and are forced to assume. that is crafty.

        • Yonnie

          Yes! This is the real problem. He thinks he just had a fun night out and “got lucky” (in the song). He thinks b/c he didn’t specifically use the word rape, or describe running up on a stranger in a parking garage with a loaded gun, that it wasn’t rape. That’s what this public debate (Todd Akin, Steubenville, etc.) has been all about. Rick Ross & everybody else need to know that THIS. IS. RAPE. He doesn’t get it. I wonder if anyone has even had a chance to try to explain it to him.

          • Sweet GA Brown

            Im sure the women in his family probably have or will bring it up. Then again he is probably just rhyming to rhyme. He doesnt care how ppl interpret it or what they do with it when the reord is cut.

            I do have a problem with this since Im a firm believer that people should never say anything that they will have to apologize for later. This is a perfect example.

    • Rewind

      Might just be me but…I still have no idea why any woman had the nerve to get so seriously mad at the Tip Drill video. Like…really? He hired strippers to do a bunch of freaky sh*t on camera but when one stripper suggest swiping a credit card between her butt cheeks for kicks and he does it….women want to lose their sh*t because he’s the rapper with the video but won’t stop by a strip club and tell them broads to get their sh*t together?

      I’m sorry but that’s why that whole scenario was a losing episode. Nelly comes to Spelman to support a cure for breast cancer, but chicks want to boycott a video for reasons to stupid to list in comparison to cancer.

      Priorities….it’d be nice if people had them.

      • The Human Spider

        I agree. That whole situation was just a d!ck move. You’re so mad at me for swiping a credit card down a stripper’s butt crack for an uncut video (at the suggestion of said stripper), that you’re going to boycott me coming to a college to raise awareness in a disease (and even cure a member of my family in the process) in retaliation?

        • Rewind

          Exactly. How does that scenario even begin to make sense? It’s classic scapegoating..instead of focusing on Nelly, why the hell was there never a discussion on why women don’t mind being objectified and why women who have a problem with objectification don’t talk to women who don’t?

          • That Ugly Kid

            why the hell was there never a discussion on why women don’t mind being objectified and why women who have a problem with objectification don’t talk to women who don’t?

            Because, this makes too much sense. It takes a lot less effort to place all of the blame on the rapper and call it a day.

            • Rewind

              And that’s why those women lost in the end.

              • IcePrincess3

                I wonder what, if anything, RWC has to say on this. Yall kno that’s her relative.

              • AfroPetite

                I love Tip Drill for what it is just like I love Bandz A Make Her Dance for what it is.

                It’s a stripper’s anthem and despite the fact that this isn’t my career path, I have no issues pretending to be one in my down time *shrug*

                • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

                  Bandz is that jam.

                • Rewind

                  That’s the shyte my girl says, she can’t dance for shyte but loves lsitening to any song that would be played on repeat in a strip club.

          • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

            for me, this is one of the biggest traps in the feminist philosophy :: women can do whatever they choose.

            i dont disagree with this on principle, but i think that personal responsibility that comes with choice. and that is open to debate only ..

            whenever there is a disagreement, it always seems to boil down to, “you cant criticize her choices” and then, the conversation ends.

            but yes, the subject of objectification is a good one. i am fully on the fence.

            • Rewind

              That’s all I ever want to be mentioned in any conversation dealing with women: personal responsibility.

              I view the conversation about women the same way I view the conversation about Black people: just because you were treated horribly in the past doesn’t give you a pass to act like a complete d-ick now and pretend that actions have no consequences, nor should you not be questioned for the choices you make. We all have to be responsible for what we say and do, nobody is above that.

              • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

                i love personal responsibility because it is all about step ya game uppp ~ and what comes of that are blessings ~*~

                • Rewind

                  Truest words ever spoken.

            • The Guy Formerly Know As Hmmmm

              Esa, you nailed it.

              • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

                thas what she said ..

                • Rewind

                  BAM!

                  Cue in the squirter!

          • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

            I think someone hit this below- many, many woman have have no issue with “objectification” in certain contexts. We’re $exual beings too. It’s in our nature to want to be desired and, possibly, dominated. Those songs give us an outlet to live that with out actually living it.

            • Rewind

              Even if it gives you an outlet though, just be honest about it. Don’t sing the lyrics, enjoy the song, then when someone asks you a real question about it, avoid dealing with reality at all cost. That’s the part that never makes sense, and then men stop taking women seriously.

            • That Ugly Kid

              I don’t think that’s what he’s saying. As with Nelly and the Tip Drill incident, swiping the card in the stripper’s azz wasn’t even HIS idea. It was the stripper’s. Yet Nelly caught the full brunt of the blame and demonized for objectifying women, when it was the WOMAN who put herself out there as an object in the first place.

              Basically, why isn’t she held accountable as well? And also, if someone puts themselves out there as an object, should there really be an issue? Because they are PROMOTING themselves to be seen as such, after all.

              • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

                “why isn’t she held accountable as well?”

                So it is your belief that str!ppers, video vixens and the like are not held accountable for being raunchy?

                Last time I checked Nelly was on a popular television show. Where is that young lady? LOL, I don’t think we disagree though.

                “And also, if someone puts themselves out there as an object, should there really be an issue?”

                I’m pretty sure this has always been an issue.

                • Rewind

                  That’s not an excuse WIP..if women were really that upset, they should have been protesting outside some strip clubs.

            • AfroPetite

              *nods head*

              I enjoyed Lil Kim and Foxy Brown so much because of this. Matter of fact, women have been objectifying the d!ck for years:

              Millie Jackson- “Slow Tongue”
              Denise Lasalle- “Lick It Before You Stick It”
              “Long Dong Silver”
              Jackie Neal- “Nookie Thang”
              Sheba Potts- ” I Can Back It Up”

              • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

                It’s kind of messed up what happened to Jackie Neal. She made a song crying for help and no one did anything until it was too late.

          • SweetSass

            Full stop.

            “Women don’t mind being objectified”?

            According to whom?

            The strippers?

            So because a stripper made a decision on her life….

            I’ve given up the right to get basic decency and respect?

            No.

            Just no.

            • http://terryodis.wix.com/todis Micthemessenger

              I’ve given up the right to get basic decency and respect?

              Of course not.

              But to argue all of this and then argue behind the word objectification is like playing hide and seek and then running and touching goose when you’re about to get caught.

              Real life isn’t like that.

      • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

        “Priorities….it’d be nice if people had them.”

        This needs to be on a T-shirt!

        • Rewind

          Trust me PA, I will find a way.

      • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

        He wasn’t coming to support a cure for breast cancer. He was coming to campus to promote being a bone marrow donor. And, the reason he was is because his sister was sick at the time and needed a bone marrow transplant. And, it just so happened that Tip Drill came out just before this.

        So, the protest was really instigated by him wanting to come to campus after releasing that song. It was like; you disrespect us and then ask us for help. Nope, not happening.

        • Rewind

          Ok bone marrow, I should have looked it up.

          But even so…for real? He was public number 1 at the time for that? Like I said, that whole fight was one-sided, short sighted and very hypocritical. Them same chicks would be at an ATL club dancing to P*ssy Poppin but Nelly gets the great video and he’s an azzhole. Too many contradictions there.

          • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

            “Them same chicks would be at an ATL club dancing to P*ssy Poppin but Nelly gets the great video and he’s an azzhole. Too many contradictions there.”

            You cannot make that general assumption. There are plenty of women who have nothing at all to do with hip hop and won’t even go to clubs that play it. I’m one of those women.

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

              To be fair, a lot of DJ’s in the club as well as radio programmers have said the same thing that Rewind alluded to.

            • Rewind

              Val, real talk…it’s Spelman. In Atlanta, Georgia.

              I am not reaching with my assumption AT ALL.

            • Todd

              Fair enough. I don’t have an issue with that. I have an issue for women calling out a dude for being sexist…the buying his record and twerking to his music. Be consistent with your outrage. (Which, to your credit Val, you are.)

      • The Guy Formerly Know As Hmmmm

        I agree. The “town hall” discussion on Oprah that followed had the women from Spelman and critics that knew nothing about rap which is fine. I thought the ladies from Spelman had a right to not want Nelly on campus but I couldn’t help but wonder why no one thought to interview the woman who got paid to let it happen. I felt like she had as much to say and to explain about the matter as anyone, considering how much she invested.

      • Joanna

        Maybe this is an unpopular opinion, but while the stripper did suggest for Nelly to use the card, my question to Nelly is: Why did you listen? Like, a statement like that doesn’t make you pause for a second? I think they were both dumb.

      • Sweet GA Brown

        I didnt get mad at that song. I was moreso mad that I woke up to that video after falling asleep on my mothers couch and all I saw was a$$. Besides that I thought about all the guys that were tip drills.

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

      “Didn’t rap have a hand in Tipper Gore’s music rating crusade?”

      Nope, that’s a common misconception there. Actually, it was a Prince song that started Tipper Gore on her witch hunt. She bought her daughter the “Purple Rain” album and walked in on her while “Darling Nikki” was playing. And so began the PMRC.

      • Joy2urwrld

        I wasn’t talking about the exact moment when Gore decided to go on her music censorship crusade, didn’t even realize she shares when that was. Interesting story lol. I was talking about the fact that rap (as well as heavy metal) was held up as 1 of the reasons this rating system was necessary.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

          No, it still wasn’t about rap. It was a Prince record and mostly heavy metal that drove the PMRC to take action. You do remember the Senate hearings back in 1985? I do.

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d65BxvSNa2o

          • Joy2urwrld

            I was born in 1986 so… Lol.

            • The Other Jerome

              Oh, so your going to use the ol’ “I wasn’t born then” defense eh???

              Thats no excuse!!

              • Joy2urwrld

                Lol he said, you remember the Senate hearings like I was watching them live and keeping up with the news reports.

          • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

            ~ You do remember the Senate hearings back in 1985? I do.

            me too ! so interesting to watch how it has played out over the past two decades.

            • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

              Yeah, really. However, the uninteded consequence of the PMRC was their actions to get albums labeled ended up making the artists sell more records.

              • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

                poetry ~*~

    • Charlie

      Nelly was wrong? Other than that I agree with your point.

      • Joy2urwrld

        Not Nelly, the guy who claimed there was no outrage over the Tip Trill video.

        • Charlie

          oooh

    • Latonya

      I remember that when a group of ladies that attend spelman college boycott the Tip Dril people where make horrible comment about the protesting the video. That was an eye opener.

  • The Human Spider

    Also, in regards to rappers trying to sound “clever” and “cool” instead of making sense, I can name some lines off the top of my head that fit this description:

    “Weezy F. Baby, and the ‘F’ is for phenomenal.”

    “Real Gs move in silence like lasagna.”

    “Ooooohhhhhhhhhhhhhh, you’re a [*censored*] funny guy. Don’t make me have to break your Kevin Hart, boy.”

    “To be nice, I sacrifice things like no sleep.”

    “Will casually lift that [*censored*] up like gravity.”

    “.38 revolves like the sun around the Earth.”

    “[Foxy Brown’s math on ‘Affirmative Action.’]”

    “[Insert Papoose line here.]”

    It’s the way of the (rap) game. Even some of my favorites have been guilty of this crime.

    • That Ugly Kid

      “Ooooohhhhhhhhhhhhhh, you’re a [*censored*] funny guy. Don’t make me have to break your Kevin Hart, boy.”

      “Real Gs move in silence like lasagna.”

      These two actually make sense and don’t deserve to be on the list.

      • The Human Spider

        Lasagna moves in silence?

        • Rewind

          Stupid as hell but lasagna doesn’t make any noise

        • The Other Jerome

          Yes it does. Ask Garfield!

          Oh… he meant the “G” is silent!!!

          • The Human Spider

            Yup. Now had he said “Real Gs move in silence like the one in lasagna”…

            But I’m not a rapper…

            • That Ugly Kid

              He didn’t need to say it that way. The fact that everyone and their mama understood that lyric but you, says more about you than it does Lil Wayne.

              • Justmetheguy

                This made me laugh out loud…I’m team TUK on this one. Both of those lyrics were decent to me. Nothing special but they weren’t dumb. It’s a rap verse not a college essay.

                • IcePrincess3

                  Agreed. I caught that “lasagna” punch line the very first time I heard it, & I liked it (Facebook). Bwahahaha see what I did there? I’m a rapper! *ducks rotten tomatoes*

                  • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

                    You have mastered the hashtag rap!

              • The Human Spider

                He didn’t need to say it that way. The fact that everyone and their mama understood that lyric but you, says more about you than it does Lil Wayne.

                I never said I never got it. I understood it, and still think it’s a reach just off wording alone.

        • That Ugly Kid

          Lol, it’s not hard to grasp. He meant that the actual letter “G” in the word “lasagna”, is silent. As it doesn’t make the traditional “G” sounds (as in “goat” or “gel”).

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

      “Will casually lift that [*censored*] up like gravity.”

      This sounds like a Pharoahe Monch lyric, LOL!

      • The Human Spider

        I purposely took out the start of that bar for guessing purposes. That was M.O.P.

        • The Other Jerome

          I bet those guys voices are like, dead for a week after one of their concerts!

          They are still the greatest though!

          • The Human Spider

            I agree with this. They make for great aggression music.

          • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

            Yep. That “Firing Squad” and “Warriorz”? Man listen…

            • Todd

              Oh I love MOP. Legendary stuff!

          • Rewind

            Man seeing them live is like being at a rock concert, they get sh-it poppin.

    • That Ugly Kid

      Here are some lyrics that SHOULD be on the list:

      “If you fake, put a egg in ya shoe and scramble”

      “I’m in the crib butt naked b!tch,
      She said my d!ck could be the next black president”

      • The Human Spider

        Shoot, man, open thread.

        • That Ugly Kid

          Naw. I can’t put myself through that.

          • The Human Spider

            LOL. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to go through that obstacle course myself…

            • IcePrincess3

              Ok, here’s a stupid lyric that irks me: I don’t f*ck wit snitches/ so don’t tell me who tellin.” What?? Wouldn’t you WANT to kno who’s snitching, so you can make sure you avoid them? Idiot *side eye*

  • Charlie

    With everything being so instant, quickly, and easily accessible; we’ve developed short attention spans. 15mins ago is old news;we keep up. To feed this want, things that would not have been news 20 years ago is becomes news today.

    When it come rap lyrics, I think we’ve all grown numb to the violence, sex, drugs, and profanity. I don’t see it as so much choosing to mad at some things while ignoring others, but showing what we are not numb to, and what makes us uncomfortable. In each generation there has been outcry when times start changing, and old taboo topics become part of everyday conversation, and/or way of life.

    Maybe we(more like you all since I’m 19)are becoming more conservative in finding this wrong or tasteless, while a newer generation is beginning to not really care. Maybe in 10 years rape lyrics will be the norm, and y’all will be shaking fist to teens, telling them to cut that noise off.

    eh i dont know.

    • minxbrie

      You’re 19?!

      I like you, we can be young together.

      “When it come rap lyrics, I think we’ve all grown numb to the violence, sex, drugs, and profanity. I don’t see it as so much choosing to mad at some things while ignoring others, but showing what we are not numb to, and what makes us uncomfortable. In each generation there has been outcry when times start changing, and old taboo topics become part of everyday conversation, and/or way of life”

      You’re right, I think the moral panic surrounding rap and hip hop music is now left to a very small minority. Because first it was viewed as noise (the ONLY thing I learned in my Alternative Media class) and now it’s considered “real music”. It’s all very formulaic:

      Rock music – drugs, sex and alcohol, and in the diffusion of rock music becoming more “poppy” – love.
      Country – alcohol, broken hearts and tractors
      Hip Hop – strippers, drugs, sex and alcohol
      Dancehall- ….sex.

      • Charlie

        TONIGHT!!!! WE ARE…. lol. Yea how old are you if you dont mind my asking?

        I mean I’ll have to lump my self in there too because the date rape lyrics do make me uncomfortable. But there is no telling if I’ll begin to start having the same attitude towards it, that I do violence.

        • minxbrie

          I will be 21 in May – legal everywhere!

          I don’t think anyone would be comfortable with date rape lyrics. Rick Ross stays off my radar because I stay out of the Black Man mosh-pit that occurs during BMF (Special mentions to “I Don’t Like” and “Palance”) but I’m not sure why people are SO SURPRISED that he would rap about rape.

          “Dancehall – sex, guns, and weed. And within the past…eight years, money.”

          Finallyyyy the herbs come arounddddd!

          Don’t forget Blackberry’s, Clark’s and I’m sure the iPhone lyrics are next. Jamaicans stay bougie.

          • Rewind

            I went to Jamaica last August. I’m Bajan & Grenadian…for the life of me, I never thought I’d meet that many bougie ass Black people in one place.

      • Never

        Dancehall – sex, guns, and weed. And within the past…eight years, money.

        • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

          Don’t forget the promotion of violence against gay and lesbian people.

          • Never

            Eh, that’s a very small percentage of dancehall – hence the omission.

          • minxbrie

            That’s not a music issue though, that’s a cultural issue. Detaching Jamaica from homophobia will take a lot more than dancehall/reggae artists not supporting it through their music.

            • Rewind

              True but some of their best known songs are friggin homophobic as hell.

              I remember when T.O.K “ChiChi Man” came out. Song is dope as f*ck until you listen to the lyrics and they talking about murdering gay people. Everybody loves Buju Banton’s “Boom Bye Bye” but that song is about capping gay dudes in the head.

              The air of Caribbean homophobic feelings is entrenched way too deep in all of the culture.

              • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

                “I remember when T.O.K “ChiChi Man” came out. Song is dope as f*ck until you listen to the lyrics and they talking about murdering gay people”

                Something that always struck me as hilarious was they used the melody to a Christmas song. Listen to “Do You Hear What I Hear” and then listen to “Chi Chi Man” and try not to laugh.

                Side note, I wonder if someone had pulled Jermaine Dupri to the side and told him about the real meaning behid his alias as Don Chi Chi?

                I’m assuming they did because he stopped using it very quickly, LMAO!

                • Rewind

                  That’s why Black people are hilarious to me. They claim all sorts of f*ckery and have no idea what it means, and then don’t realize the rest of the world is lauhging their asses off at them.

              • AfroPetite

                I remember a Jamaican friend putting me on to what Boom Bye Bye really was all about smh

                That song goes so hard though and when it comes on at a party my body just instinctively starts rolling.

                • Rewind

                  You can’t help it! That song was made to grind against somebody yet its about killing somebody. Its crazy.

                  • minxbrie

                    As pro-gay as I am, if Boom Bye Bye comes on, I lose my ethical high ground.

                    And I can still recite “Chi Chi Man” perfectly.

                    We make some catchy anthems about the worst things.

                  • h.h.h.

                    thats why i wouldn’t play boom bye bye too long, but i’d compensate by playing Mad Cobra – Flex longer… #RiddimWinning

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

      “In each generation there has been outcry when times start changing, and old taboo topics become part of everyday conversation, and/or way of life.”

      I remember back in 1988, when people frowned on N.W.A. singing about selling drugs. Almost fifteen years later, one of the biggest hip hop songs of 2002 was “Grindin'” by the Clipse.

      • AfroPetite

        I knew (still know) ALL the lyrics to Grindin and I was 12 when it came out. Aside from the drug laced lyrics (haha I made a funny) every one was enamored by the hook and there wasn’t a cafeteria table, school bus window, or wall that could escape someone replicating the beat for an impromptu freestyle :-)

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

          If you go on YouTube and read the comments section, that song is forever known by many as the “lunchtable beat”. The Neptunes knew they created a monster that year.

        • Rewind

          Man that beat was one of the greatest beats of all time, you couldn’t stop anyone from trying to rhyme over it or create the beat during lunchtime. Ahh..memories.

        • http://www.twitter.com/epsilonicus Eps

          I went to private school and even the White kids would break out in freestyles over that beat!

      • http://missrosen.wordpress.com esa

        i remember when the FBI was profiling NWA and Ice T and the government got themselves involved. now Obama and Jay are rockinn it like JFK and Sinatra. we goinn full circle real fast.

        • http://www.youtube.com/user/pervertedalchemist1?feature=mhee Perverted Alchemist

          On the other hand, remember when Eazy-E was invited to the White House during Goerge Bush’s tenure as president? Even I was like “Huh?!”