“Niggas In Paris” Are Still Niggers To Parisians » VSB

Featured, Race & Politics

“Niggas In Paris” Are Still Niggers To Parisians

I have an older cousin named Halima. She lives in Nimes with her husband and five-year-old daughter, named Hikma, who is an avid Frozen enthusiast (called La Reines des Neiges in French) and Beyonce-in-training.

For the most part, they live relatively peaceful middle-class existences. But every morning, Halima makes the trek from Nimes to Avignon to go work at the hospital there — and every morning, she quietly recites the basmala to herself. Bismillahirrahmanirrahim – “In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful.” Those few words help her muster up the strength to get on the train and face her sincere fear that her next day on public transportation could be her last.

It should be no surprise that anti-Blackness is a phenomenon that extends to Western Europe, considering that they were the initial settlers of what is now America and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. However, the concept that countries like France are these magical, post-racial havens for the truly evolved and erudite has been a concept that seems to have persisted from the Baldwin era. Visions of smokey rooms where elites hobnob with Black American intellectuals over cognac and transcendent jazz music continue to be the predominant perspective, drawn out from the near-reverent recounting of Black American academics and artistic contemporaries from the Harlem Renaissance and post WWI-era.

You even see it in present day with renowned race and culture commentator Ta-Nehisi Coates, who during a recent interview, said the following:

“..the sociology that comes out of slavery is a little different from the sociology that comes out of colonialism. France colonized all sorts of people—Asian people, black people, whoever. So the relationship is a little different. It’s not a good relationship. But America has a very specific thing with black people. Here, the people who get it the worst are actually the Muslims…”

While that may be a seemingly innocuous statement, it obscures a few key things. Most glaringly, there’s an implication that France did not participate in chattel slavery, which it did, as did most Western European empires at the time. Secondly, while it is true that the French colonial empire extended to parts of Southeast Asia, any map of the modern French colonial empire will make it plainly clear that their rule extended primarily over Black nations — and that autonomy over Black states extended well into the the 20th century. The country where my family is from, Comoros, didn’t obtain independence until 1975; which is to say, my mother was born under French rule, with a French passport, and a French birth certificate.

What is arguably most glaring is this attempted bifurcation of race and religion — identities, which in France, are almost inextricably linked. Yes, France has a strong case of Islamophobia, which is made quite evident by things such as the “secular” law banning women from wearing religious headdresses in public, as well as the recently passed law enabling French government to revoke the birthright citizenship of anyone convicted of “terroristic” activity — terroristic activity being this amoebic catchall that is yet to be defined, of course.

That said, the key oversight in that assessment is that of the millions of French citizens and residents that self-identify as Muslim, approximately 80% of them at last count were 1st or 2nd generation descendants of the African continent. Subsequently, it is these people who are consistently harassed; pulled off trains and demanded to show their papers, pushed into slum communities (also known as banlieues), denied jobs they are qualified for, quality education or service without cause, arrested with limited justification, belittled via “satirical” comics.

And yes, even murdered, as we are in the United States.

On July 19th, Adama Traore, a Black Muslim Frenchman, died on his 24th birthday in police custody. As I write this, the family still doesn’t have any concrete answers as to what happened during his transport. This is a tragedy that we are all too familiar with here in the US, but it is a pain that reverberates globally; the extinguishing of Black bodies with little disregard or concern for the communities that continue to sear with the remnants of that anguish.

It is for those reasons that my cousin prays. She prays to get home in one piece. She prays to not run into law enforcement. She prays for her daughter to not have to recall her in memories before she should have to.

This isn’t the part of France you will see on TV. It might not even be the part of France you see in person; the banlieues exist on the outskirts for a reason, and if you just stay in the 20 arrondissements of Paris with your American passport in full view you may just consistently be viewed as a tourist first. I would certainly assume that a writer of Coates’s stature would be of the means to stay close to the city center, nor do I deride him for that choice. That experience, however, doesn’t dismiss the suffering of large swaths of Black communities just a few miles south. Black neighborhoods are being torn apart by fraught relationships with both police and non-POC demographics, and they are crying for their voices to be heard. We should take pains to not erase that context in framing our own personal experiences.

Baldwin once said of America, “all you are ever told in this country about being Black is that it is a terrible, terrible thing to be.” That sober reality unfortunately still hold us tight in our clutches in 2016; not just in the United States, but in large swaths of the Western World. Anti-Blackness is everywhere, even in the home of the Age of Enlightenment; and it would behoove us to step away from viewing White supremacy as a uniquely American problem as much as it is a pervasive viciousness that has left its imprints on Black populations the world over.

Shamira Ibrahim

Shamira is a twentysomething New Yorker who likes all things Dipset. You can join her in waxing poetically about chicken, Cam'ron, and gentrification (gotta have some balance) under the influence of varying amounts of brown liquor at her semi-monthly blog, shamspam.tumblr.com

  • DBoySlim

    I just watched a documentary on the eradication of the Tasmanians. Black people have abused the world over.

    • Kas

      Have “been” abused?

      • DBoySlim

        Good catch

  • LyricMeThis

    Wow! Thanks for sharing this perspective. I actually traveled to Paris a few weeks ago and was nervous about what to expect. I did not experience anything negative but I also did not venture outside of the city either. I think sometimes it is far too easy to get lost in the struggle here and forget about the global experience of other black populations.

  • Kas

    When I first heard of Coates love affair with France, my first thought was but the French are so hard on Africans. I didn’t get how he was so blind to the issues in France that he waxes on so eloquently about in the U.S.

    • LMNOP

      France is so frequently romanticized as this idyllic country. I don’t really get it, it seems like not that many other countries get such positive perceptions. And of course it’s a tragedy when people die, but there have been terrorist attacks all over the world these past couple years, and the media really focuses in when it happens in France.

      • Kas

        I have a friend in law enforcement at the local level, but who was also part of a task force focused on terrorism. About 3 or 4 years ago my wife and me were talking to him and his wife about traveling (my wife and him were commiserating over how clueless their spouses were to the evils of the world). The one thing that I remember, especially in light of recent events, was his very strong comments about Paris/France, and how it was a hotbed of activity for terrorists. Like seriously when he and his wife vacationed there, his wife enjoyed being a tourist and he was basically on tactical alert the entire time.

      • Ess Tee

        A large part of France being romanticized is because of Black Americans experiencing a bit more freedoms there than they did in Jim Crow and heavily segregated America. The French had a love affair with Black Americans that was unmatched.

        The great irony, of course, is that even then, the French were still treating its colonized brethren and sistren in much the same ways that Black Americans were treated by the U.S. system of segregation and Jim Crow.

        • Asiyah

          Exactly, and much of those freedoms came only because those Black Americans were seen as the elite as a result of their talents. They were just props, nothing more.

        • This.

        • L8Comer

          Their love affair was fetishization. They love us in that way.. We’re like caricatures. That’s why I could never get down with them

        • FiercePassion

          I will say that when I was hitch-hiking around Europe in the 80s with a pale white blond woman, Paris was the only continental city I felt I could relax in (for some definition of “relax”). It was the only continental city in which I could rest assured that I wasn’t the first Black woman that the locals had ever laid eyes on. That sense of “relaxed” stayed with me in the rest of France, even though there was no reason for it, as the rural folx I encountered in France might have well been in the north of Denmark for all their familiarity with seeing an actual live Black woman.

      • Asiyah

        France is disgusting and we need to call it out. Everyone harps on about the US and the UK as colonial powers but want to gloss over French history. Give me a break.

        • LMNOP

          Yeah, France definitely has an ugly history, there’s a reason so many people in the world speak French, and it’s not that it’s just a nice language. And even some of those very small European countries have some pretty horrific colonial histories.

        • MsSula

          French colonization was the most brutal and the most damaging to indigenous culture. To this day, ex-French colonies in Africa are struggling with identity issues. I can cite my own country as Exhibit A in this debacle.

          • I can imagine….France wants you to forsake all that you are culturally to embrace Frenchness.. Although Frenchess will never embrace you…

      • Question

        I’ll be honest – I love France. Lived in Paris for a year. Loved it. Hope to own real estate their in the future. Would love to have my children spend time in France. But here’s the thing I can’t deny – that plan is also contingent on reaching a level of financial success (because you can’t buy real estate using debt as a foreigner so cash money), which reinforces this balance of being an elite and therefore receiving certain benefits.

        I know this. I readily acknowledge it. What do I do with that? What do we as a people do with it? How do you navigate the balance of being conscious, aware and honest with one’s self while also trying to enjoy the world and all its variety?

        Does that mean that Blacks can and should only love Black places (because there are really truly the only places in which white supremacy has not taken hold in some form)?

        • rehreh

          These are great questions – wish I had some answers to go with them…

        • Kas

          I’m all for enjoying/living places that appeal to you. There is no country that doesn’t have an issue with race/tribe/and-or religion, including the Caribbean and Sub Sahara Africa. I’m just not a fan of pretending those places are perfect.

          • Question

            Agreed. It sounds like, however, some folks aren’t ok with black folks loving places with racist histories or subcultures.

            • LadyJay?

              Nah. There’s no place that’s perfect.

            • Kas

              Well unless we are all planning on immigrating to the moon, that is problematic.

    • Crawford

      I wonder if black Americans have a privilege over Black French and Africans over there due to us being Americans. I’ve heard murmurs from people outside of the U.S. saying that being an American is a privilege in and of itself, regardless of skin color.

      • Kas

        We do, at least based on my experience. I have traveled to a few places in Europe. The only place I wasn’t treated like a rock star was Seville, Spain. We were actually treated poorly there.

        • Crawford

          That could be why people like Coate wax poetically about France. Privilege can blind you to the reality.

          • Asiyah

            I’ve noticed that he is blind to certain Europeanisms.

            • Kas

              Blind AF

              • LadyJay?

                LOL. Like his blind is THAT skrooong? Your addition of AF is funny.

          • LadyJay?

            But how can you be waxing such poetic when you ‘woke’?

            • Question

              But that’s the challenge – when you experience “normal” or “better” treatment as a person of color, is your first though “hmm…let me dissect why this is” or is the first thought “>sigh< well this is nice".

              • Kas

                Depends on if I’m on vacation.

              • LadyJay?

                But yet the same people of color have a different experience……

                • Question

                  I thought the point is that we’re not all the same people of color. That there is perceived benefit in being Black American or a Black Brit or wealthy Black that may adjust some of the treatment you experience as a person of color in foreign countries.

                  • LadyJay?

                    That is not the point.

                    • Question

                      Isn’t it at the heart of the point – that despite the fact that we are not all the same, that there is a common experience that is the effects of white supremacy, and that we need to address and acknowledge that? Isn’t that why we don’t like Pharrell and his new blackness because it ignores the privilege that is associated with his being an entertainer, wealthy and male? And that when he makes prescriptions for how Blacks should behave in 2016 they ignore the benefits associated with his position in society?

                    • Gibbous

                      Being an “entertainer, wealthy and male” only protects him as long as people know who he is. I think that there are LOTS of LEO and others who haven’t a clue.

                      I know that wealth can protect you, but only so much.

                    • Question

                      Agreed.

                  • Gibbous

                    I don’t think it’s so much socioeconomic background – how can you tell – but diction or accent. (Hence code switching)

                    I was born and raised in Upstate NY, and I KNOW I’m treated differently than some my friends because I don’t have a distinct accent. Most people can’t tell where I’m from. It’s just that White people feel I’m not all that “other” from them. I am, however, not fooled.

          • Blueberry01

            Privelege…and kind treatment…

        • Spain is racist as fawk but Ib was treated way better when I was a Black American vs. An Afro Cubana

          • Sigma_Since 93

            Europe is microagression central. Period, point blank.

            • These are the people who used to slaughter each other every decade or so back in the day but somehow Americans are reckless cowboys.

          • Mary

            Do you think Europeans treat Africans and former Black colonials worse because they have baggage with them that they don’t have with Black Americans?
            A lot of Africans studied in Atlanta during segregation and the white folks there would accept them as guests because they weren’t “their negroes” Crazy.
            How did people treat you when they knew you were AfroCuban AND African American?

            • Being Black American carries A LOT OF WEIGHT.

              I just think Black Americans are sought after because of our prominence globally.

        • NonyaB

          *Wondering what faux pas you pulled in some tapas bar or whether they just thought “this ninja ees etrouble* ?

          • Kas

            Ninjas is trouble. From start to finish, just not a pleasant experience.

      • Jennifer

        I’ve never been to France, but in every European country I’ve visited – England, Italy, Austria, Germany, Spain – I’ve had at least one experience where the treatment I received was much different once they realized I was Black American and not African.

        • EastAfricaine

          We used to pretend to be African-American all the time so that we could be allowed into clubs in Paris. They assume that because you’re American you are automatically wealthier and less ratchet than an African…

          • MsSula

            Also.

          • Val

            Wow, someone pretending to be African American to gain an advantage? Imagine that.

            • MsSula

              Quite common actually. Especially when traveling on Air France with an American passport. You are treated 50x better than just good old Africans

            • Mochasister

              I know. That sounds so strange. Personally I think Africans are favored over African Americans here in the States.

      • Freebird

        We do.

      • God Shammgod

        Yes, you’re a tourist first, as long as they hear you speak early, lol. My experiences in Europe as a tourist vary drastically from when I’m travelling there with my immigrant family and staying “as a local.”

        There is a definite fetishization of “Black American cool” that can’t be denied, especially in “trendy” spaces.

        • Did you see the film The Class, Sham? The students saw themselves as Senegalese or other nationalities and not “hyphenated French” and I remembered on of my French professors speaking on the problem. Are the assimilation issues just tangled by frustration, flat-out racism and lack of economic opportunities?

          • God Shammgod

            I haven’t but I shall. I might also read the novel as well.

            The short answer is yes. The long answer is yes, and…housing segregation, colonialism issues, a need for autonomous identity (remember that a lot of these immigrant communities are from countries that got their independence less than 50 years ago so divesting themselves from french nationalism is a political statement at times) and a whole host of other things that I would need months and months to put together in a series of sorts.

            If you’re interested in another movie that draws on the pain of disenfranchised french immigrants, check out La Haine. Totally different tack/perspective but a quality movie.

            • True.

              I remember starting La Haine on IFC or some channel of that ilk back in the day but falling asleep on it in the middle of the night. I need to go back and revisit that. The Battle of Algiers was good film too.

          • MsSula

            I have seen the movie. And the reason is French society does NOT allow for those kids to assimilate or integrate. The advantage/disadvantage is they usually have some ties to the continent (parents, themselves, grandparents) so it’s easier to revert back to the country that would accept you.

      • We, absolutely, do. THROUGHOUT Europe..I lived it.

      • rehreh

        Good call – Black Americans in France definitely have American privilege. In my personal experience, even moreso than a White American because French people are scared that all those fuckers love Trump (Bush before him). Awful for the Black French and French/Francophone Africans – which I can also attest to because bitches don’t know I’m American until I talk and I can see the look in (some not all) people’s eyes when they find out I’m “different” but it’s too late, like you don’t get to hate me on account of my appearance and then try to be my buddy later NOPE.

        • Kas

          Kudos for the use of the phrase “those fuckers”

        • ursanegro

          like how when someone says “noir americain” and the “cain” part is this weird sing-songy two-syllable-instead-of-one, which indicates that, y’know, you’re a black with culture and breeding and not like one of these savages that we had to save from [insert whatever here]

          ugh. i’m so over france. i only go there when i have to visit family, or for visa runs because the country i currently live in doesn’t like foreign black people *either*. ugh.

        • Medium Meech

          Every time ‘m somewhere and it hit’s me that my Americanness and my form of blackness is privilege… it’s such a foreign concept that it makes me uncomfortable.

          • Question

            This. Its not an easy topic, at all. Especially the “what do I do with the knowledge” part…?

        • Lillie Emily

          I would go as far as saying that Black Americans are treated better in Africa than native Africans. As someone who is both African and American, I see how people get mystified when I speak English because I have no accent. When I attempt to tell them that I am African and was actually born in the continent, they almost never believe me. It’s really sad!

          • LadyJay?

            That accent thing irks me to no end.

      • NonyaB

        They do. You’re perceived and treated differently as a Black North American vs an African immigrant. Of course, money trumps all, so if you have enough, you might think differently as an African (but I’d bet not much differently).

        • Crawford

          Do you think it’s because they still remember the Black American soldiers doing a lot for their country or they perceive us as being better educated/richer?

          • Question

            The latter. Europe has a love/hate relationship with America. They love to talk about how uncouth and immature we are as a nation and a people (some of which is true) but they also, deep down, envy much of the economic policies we have here (with respect to privatized business) and the opportunities that exist here. I think they also deep down at least acknowledge the benefits of greater social mobility (we don’t have hereditary nobility like what they have in Europe and many find that appealing).

          • NonyaB

            Nah. Sure there are those who remember overall American good deeds in wartime but with younger generation, it’s more media-pushed black flyness/swag, e.g. Basketball, music incl videos, etc. There’s also the layer of black glamour from those Black Americans in the arts who were in Paris back in the day (Josephine Baker, Baldwin etc).

            • Crawford

              That sounds a little bit how the Japanese think of Black Americans.

              • Hammster

                True. In Japan, they treated me as if I were a black God.

                • Mochasister

                  Lol! It must have been nice.

                • Blueberry01

                  They probably thought you were a basketball player. Actually, you look like someone I know. Are you from L.A.?

                  • Hammster

                    Some did and nope, not from LA

          • rehreh

            The elderly white French definitely have misty-eyed, good-times feelings towards Black Americans because of our soldiers liberating their villages during WWII, my grandmother-in-law included. Oh, the conversations I’ve had in grocery store lines with old grandpas and grandmas… and also grocery store cashiers who love to tell me about their sister’s best friend’s recent trip to Las Vegas (NO1CURR NEVER BEEN LEAVE ME ALONE).

      • Minx

        Having a US passport means a lot, especially when it comes to travelling. Have you ever looked up comparisons to how many countries a US passport opens doors to vs a non-US(read: non-Western) passport? It’s shocking

      • Sigma_Since 93

        It would appear that we would get a pass given our linked histories. It’s hard to hate on the folks, and their descendants, that saved your bacon.

      • Question

        Lived in Paris and the answer is yes. And they know that one is American based on walk, and style of dress – so it wasn’t even necessary to open my mouth – folks knew.

        • Nik White

          When I visited I was wearing my hair in braids pulled into a bun and I tried to speak a little French. The shop keepers & etc would respond too quickly and the jig was up, as in “oh Black American”.

          • Lillie Emily

            This! I tried to practice my French with these Parisians and they were not having any of it!

            • grownandsexy2

              I guess I had better not even attempt to speak the language cause I’m as rusty as a nail.

        • Hammster

          Walk? What’s their interpretation of how an American walks?

          • Mary

            Americans take up a lot of space when walking and we walk in an uninhibited, “free” manner. And you know brothers got that mild pimp walk;)

        • Mochasister

          Americans walk differently?

      • That was my experience in England and France. Folks love Black Americaness… But in Spain that was’t the case.

      • Blueberry01

        I think it does.

    • Freebird

      I went to France with what Ive read and heard…then I was taken to where people actually struggle and I listened and learned that I was misinformed. When a lot of intellectuals and educated folks travel they rarely make their way to places where everday people live. How you are treated in stores and cafes is different from how you are treated in the “slums.”

      • Kas

        We did a walking tour based on the history of African Americans in Paris. Our tour guide was horrible, but it did get us off the beaten path of typical touristy spots.

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      He’s practically James Baldwin.

      • L8Comer

        I like his writing but that comparison annoys me. I like James Baldwins writing much more

        • Kas

          Sarcasm my dear, sarcasm.

          • L8Comer

            Is it? A LOT of people make that comparison

            • Kas

              I took it as such. I will be the first to apologize to you if I was wrong.

              • L8Comer

                Lol

        • kingpinenut

          make that love….James Baldwin is life

    • American blacks have the “luxury” of being loved in Europe… the rest of the ni66as get shyt.

      Europeans have a romanticized idea of black Americans…

      • ursanegro

        yebo

      • Mary

        Yes, I felt that too. I don’t trust that because it’s like being an exhibit at the zoo. Whwn I see other Blacks treated bad I know that if I don’t keep their fantasy entertained I’ll be treated the same way because some of it may be cultural, race plays a large part in it too.

    • Brandon Allen

      I don’t know if this is an unpopular opinion. But most people even the educated don’t want to look at race globally. I get that some of that is a proximity issue, but as Americans I’ve never felt that we have it “the worst” in some kind of sadness contest and it bugs me when people act like its an American problem.

      • Crawford

        I think some people balk at the idea because some people use that to excuse the problems here. Like telling poor people that there are poorer people elsewhere. It’s true, but that doesn’t solve the problem a poor person is having right now in the U.S.
        I wish we wouldn’t do the contest thing and just acknowledge that there’s some messed up racial stuff going on globally.

        • Brandon Allen

          Yeah I don’t get why people talk in such a mutually exclusive manner.

      • cyanic

        White supremacy is global. But American white supremacy gives all other versions of it elsewhere a run for its money.

        • Thriller

          This continent bang in the middle of the world would like to say “hi”. NaturalResources getting pimped, human resources “sold”/taken centuries ago and they still love massa.

          There’s 1 West African nation that has had 7-8 Heads of State since gaining independence. 1 black first lady.

          • LadyJay?

            Which one?! And has having all those heads of states helped?

          • ursanegro

            “1 black first lady”

            i’m mad that you called out senegal like that. lol. i think abdou diouf’s wife was at least half black though. lol

            • Thriller

              It’s crazy. Africans have been brain washed by white supremacy even more than AA’s.

        • Question

          This is exactly what I think Brandon Allen is talking about. I’m saying this without snark – have you experienced White Supremacy in other parts of the world? I would argue that parts of Europe – northern Spain, Italy, Poland, Russia are MUCH worse than American white supremacy. MUCH WORSE.

          And lets not even get into what its like in sub-Saharan African countries. Have we already forgotten that it was less than 35 years ago that apartheid was formally abolished in South Africa??

          And we haven’t even gotten into the trickle down effects that White Supremacy has had on other people’s of color that has lead to the reinforcement of supremacist beliefs in countries and amongst groups that aren’t white (e.g. Indians, Asians etc.).

          • cyanic

            I have yet to travel aboard. And stating white supremacy is global is accepting there’s mistreatment of people of color elsewhere and acknowledging that white supremacy conditioning has people of color altering their appearance to conform to European beauty standards.

            • Question

              There’s a difference between saying white supremacy is global and arguing that it is worse here in the US than anywhere else in the world. As others have mentioned, I don’t understand why we insist on putting ourselves in pole position in the grievance Olympics. “Who has it worse” is an unproductive game to play…and its a distraction.

              • cyanic

                Because America has never let up. The hate moves under new names and presents itself with a new shape.

          • Exhibit A: The global phenomenon of skin bleaching

            • kingpinenut

              that ish alone….smgdh

          • Leggy

            Omg. The way Asians adore white skin eh. People always talk about colorism in the black community that makes me laugh. Colorism in Asian communities is terrible. All those Korean products all have bleaching components to them.

      • D A

        I’m not sure that it’s possible to look at race globally since what it means to be a certain “race” has distinct cultural and historical resonance. Part of the cultural resonance is particularly evident in the context of being an ex-pat or immigrant. As I’m sure we’re all aware, they are not the same thing. We’re all prone to be suspicious of foreigners but whether the reaction is actively hostile or curious acceptance will have more to do with whether there is real or perceived competition for local goods; land, jobs, spouses etc. I think that Americans in Europe regardless of colour are not perceived to be competitors but rather to add something chic and glamorous to the society of those they mix with hence the very different reaction as compared with Afro – French or African immigrant residents.

        It should be obvious that race in a homogeneous society will be a very different thing from what obtains in a multi-cultural society. Also the experience of race as a minority of the population will be different. There will also be differences if there are languages or dialects linked to ethnic group which creates a proxy for race in outwardly homogeneous societies.

    • The fact that they were so hard on Africans and blacks is what lead them to acquire the services the bulk of the 92nd and 93rd divisions during WWI. The US didn’t want it’s own men who were black fighting but the French were like we’ll take them. We know blacks. None of this was out of admiration or being progressive but the French thinking they were just like the Senagalese troops already in their umbrella which became cannon fodder.

    • EastAfricaine

      He cannot talk about colonized countries and overlook French oversees territories such as Martinique and Guadeloupe. Them black people did not end up on those territories by accident, neither were their ancestors expats. France has a ugly background of slavery AND colonialism.

    • Duva

      He should read some Frantz Fanon. I can see how a black American (or anyone) of means would enjoy life in Paris though.

      • Kas

        I certainly enjoyed my too short vacation there and expect to return at some point.

      • Lillie Emily

        Love Frantz Fanon!

  • Cersei

    This. Was in France a few years ago and I noticed that their attitudes towards me and my family, before and after they found out we were American, were vastly different.

  • I’ve said to friends before that I’m not interested in visiting a lot of these “essential” European cities for more than the photo ops. Beyonce and Jay seem to love Paris, so therefore the rest of us need to also, and London is romanticized so much by these “y’all ni99gas ain’t been to the Seychelles yet so we can’t speak until you have more than 12 passport stamps” travelnoire types you would think it actually had good weather, affordable anything, and decent food.

    I’m not naïve to think it’s so much better for black folks outside the U.S. In Guyana, where my family is from and a former British colony, the East Indians and blacks are in a constant state of turmoil largely due to lingering attitudes from when Indians were brought over as indentured labors and thought they were better than the enslaved blacks. I have Indian family members who are darker than me but call my kind “black wata dougla (term for black and Indian mix)” to indicate that somehow I’m just a bit less than.

    Ain’t safe to be black nowhere, chile.

    • Vanity in Peril

      Your last sentence.

    • Minx

      Don’t get too deep now, the Caribbean lives in denial that race plays any part in their formation or current struggles.

      Also the first time someone called me dougla I nearly threw hands cause I was convinced they were insulting me.

      • lmao! Dougla was usually thrown at me like I’m some kind of outlier because I’m the only one in my family with these well-defined 2c-3a curls and my skin gets a little red underneath in the summer. To a lot of folks, half-black ain’t as bad as all black.

        I sneered my way through a conversation with a Dominican girl who was convinced people are “blowing the whole thing with Haiti out of proportion.” BEYOTCH THEY KILLING THEIR OWN FAMILY ON THE SAME ISLAND CUS THEY DARKER. How is that out of proportion?!! Slavery and its ills are still verrrrry present in modern-day Caribbean culture, from our music to the ways in which we raise our girls to be subservient cooks who “breed” children instead of raise them.

        • Minx

          See, I’m Jamaican so I had no understanding of the word and I was like excuse me?! (I am embarrassed at how long it took me to finally correctly Google the word)

          I have a weird relationship with Dominicans but like, the anti-Haitian policies and sentiments have been a longstanding issue since Trujillo. To deny that our histories have NO impact on how we conduct ourselves in the present is so false.

          • Do y’all use coolie? That’s another one of “those” words you hear bandied about

          • Edithvjenkins3

            <<y:y. ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????:::::::!!bx135a:….,….

          • Tiarajreed3

            <<a:y. ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????:::::::!!bx325a:….,.

      • Blueberry01

        Yup. And all up through Hispanic culture, too.

      • Guest

        It is an insult. I am from T&T and I am surprised at how the word is said so normally, almost like a term of endearment.

    • MsKey

      I tell my friends that I have no interest as either. My best friend is dying to go to Italy, I have zero desire to go there.

      • Kas

        You should go for the photo ops and the food. The gelato will change your life.

        • NonyaB

          The food, nougat, leathergoods in the south were good.

          • Val

            leather goods?

            Okay, you have piqued my interest. I could go for a nice Italian leather coat and a few backpacks. :-)

            • NonyaB

              Yass! They’ve got good crafts going on there. Some of the stuff had me salivating.

            • L8Comer

              The San Lorenzo market in Florence is renowned for fine leather goods. Rome is known for shoes.

              On a trip to Florence I fell in love with this super soft brown leather jacket. Some of the best quality leather I’ve ever seen. It was 600 euros ?. I got the lady down to 320, but it was still too much. Finally, with an almost teary, longing look in her eyes the saleswoman grabbed my hands and said “give me 250 euros in cash and it’s yours. You remind me so much of my niece and I want you to have it. Just go quickly before my boss notices”
              I shoved the money in her hand, gave her a hug and skipped away lol. I love that jacket. And I thought it was so sweet she thought I reminded her of her niece cuz she was white and I’m def… Err.. Cara-chocolate

              • Val

                Wow. That’s amazing. I’ve been wanting a full length leather coat for a while. I want a classic cut and great quality so I can wear it for 20 years from now and not just for a few seasons. Italy sounds like the place to make that happen.

                • L8Comer

                  Definitely. I plan to have mine till I die so I didn’t mind dropping 250 euros which is still a lot of money especially cuz the euro was stronger back then. But I knew I was making an investment and getting a good deal. I forgot what each region is known for as far as goods but I know leather is Florence and Rome is shoes. Probably cuz of those rough cobble stones everywhere

              • GenevaGirl

                You never know. She could have a bi-racial niece.

                • L8Comer

                  Very true! Or her niece could be white and my personality could’ve reminded her of her niece. Either way, it was kinda touching lol

                  • Nik White

                    Yep Hannibal and nem left a few items.

              • La Katiolaise

                Florence!! To this day it is my favorite city in the world. Went there when I was still a teenager and loved everything about it: the food, the museums, the atmosphere, the people – they were actually really friendly and welcoming…was a bit scared because I heard they were racist. Now That I think about it, I’m pretty sure they mistook me for an American! I was speaking english to them so they probably had no clue they were interacting with an African girl lol. Sure, random people were calling me chocolate, caramel and whatnot but coming from France, I was used to it and heard worse…And yes! the leather goods! I long for the day I will be able to go back.

          • L8Comer

            Oh yea leather goods in Florence. The San Lorenzo market?

            • NonyaB

              And all the family business workshops/factories around the city!

              • L8Comer

                Yes! There’s a lot of small little family business. It’s great cuz you find one of a kind stuff there!

        • MsKey

          I would go, I just have other places in mind that I would like to visit first.

          • Kas

            Top destination choice is?

            • MsKey

              Fiji, Bali…I LOVE beaches.

      • There’s still a few places on the bucket list. Iceland, Ireland, south of France,
        Vienna and Spain (again because the last time I was there I was too
        drunk & high to remember much.)

        • Careful she bites

          Iceland was quite nice. The people I met and interacted with were all nice. No one followed me around a store to make sure I wasn’t stealing. No one looked at me “weird” for possessing all this melanin. I’m not trying to paint this picture of perfection; just giving my account. I highly recommend it…though it’s expensive af.

          • There’s something about it that seems more magical than the usual Scandinavian countries. Dat winter doe. :(

        • Andrea

          Ireland is actually really great. I’d go back. It’s wild how small the country is. I also stayed with an Irish friend and got to rub shoulders with more locals. The seafood is pretty good too.

        • Shanghiatus

          Barcelona is an amazing international city. Granada is this cool, college town. I stayed in an airbnb in El Albaicin. The most incredible sunset I have witnessed. I used blah blah car (ride share) to get over to Sevilla. I was there during Semana Santa or Holy Week (Easter) No one paid me any mind as I was one of many tourist. I’ve been out the country 2.5 years now. It’s not easy or as glamorous as these travel blogs would have you believe, but is very rewarding and has restored my faith in humanity on several occasions.

      • Duva

        I say go. Yes there are systemic issues everywhere but doesn’t mean you won’t have a great time as a tourist. I live in Europe and while stereotypes abound, my interactions with most white (and other) Europeans people have been fine. And certainly enjoy the different foods, scenery, cultural vibes.

      • Gibbous

        I think travel broadens your mind – as long as you’re encountering the local culture and people. I live in NC, and when a coworker told me she’d left the state once in her life, and never ate a bagel until she was like 50 – WHAT??

        In NY, I knew folks who lived 20 minutes from the Canadian border and had never been to Montreal which was literally less than 90 minutes away. ‘Murica was good enough for them!

        I feel really privileged that my parents preferred to spend family money on travel instead of fashionable clothes and fancy foods. (Now I do, didn’t so much as a child.)

        • Conrad Bess

          Travel is the best education one can get. Visiting Peru and Chile was one of the smartest things I’ve ever done. I just need to get my butt to Jamaica (haven’t been since a child; need to see my fam) Colombia,, and several west Africa nations (Ghana, Senegal, etc.)

          • Diego Duarte

            The fuck? You visited us? Hope you didn’t run accross too much racism in either country since we’re notorious for it. Although indigenous Peruvians get far more racism aimed at them than black Peruvians.

            • Conrad Bess

              Was there long ago. And like most of the VSS/VSB collective have posted, it was clear to the natives that I was a tourist, so I was afforded some liberties. I was in Lima and didn’t see a single black face. Incredible food, heart wrenching poverty, beautiful souls of the people I did get to talk to. For some reason though, 5-0 were reluctant to pose with a brother.

              • Diego Duarte

                Ah yes, well, since Spanish conquistadores found indigenous people already populating the place when they invaded, they didn’t bother bringing that many Africans over the Atlantic and enslaved the indigenous instead. Consequently black Peruvians in Lima are as rare as a shooting star. If you go to Chincha though, there’s plenty of black Peruvians.

                Food. Well, we’ve held the title for Best Destination to Eat in the world for the past 4-5 years. I forget.

                Poverty: whelp, the country has always been right wing. And when we’ve gotten anything close to socialism we’ve gotten US sponsored coups, or otherwise US sponsored dictators (thanks Clinton).

                Maybe it was the language barrier? Could still be racism, or they mistook you for a Colombian, which would classify as xenophobia instead.

                • Conrad Bess

                  What I encountered was more curiosity than prejudice or racism. The friend I went with is Trini (brown), and we’re both photographers, so before we left, we went on a site and said we’d do photos for anyone who’d be our guide while there. A lady responded and was our de facto guide/bodyguard. The only memorable encounter was with a hostess trying to get us to go to her bar. We declined, she had said something and our guide told me she had said to get the man with eyes like the sun and rich chocolate skin to come back.
                  It was a very enriching experience in Peru.

              • leesupreme

                Thats because some of them were still on cotton plantations… no exaggeration.

            • MajorLazer

              So, this is interesting. I did 3 weeks in colombia about a month ago. started in bogota, then went up to santa marta, then cartagena and ended up in medellin. I speak spanish, and for the most part, everything was great. Had a couple experiences which gave me pause, but nothing that ruined my day.

              1. Being called “negro” on the street. Whenever people were trying to sell me things, street hustlers, shopkeepers, etc,, they would call my attention by saying “Negro!” in spanish. it was kind of a little jarring, but i dont think it was meant in a perjorative way, just sort of a descriptor like “tall guy”. I realized that the only black housekeeper in my hostel was constantly called “negra” when the other staff were referring to her. Never got up the courage to ask her about it.

              2. Not being allowed into a club in Bogota by a security guy for seemingly arbitrary reasons. I was with a bunch of whiter-than-white English guys I’d just met, I mistakenly went in the exit line instead of the entry, the security guy corrected me and i went dutifully into the right line. When i got to him, he asked for “documentario” and since gringos get robbed in bogota constantly, none of us brought out our stuff. obviously he didnt ask anyone else for this documentation, and so i couldn’t get in the club. one of the white guys had to get someone else to intervene before i could get in. the white guy said it might have been a racist thing, and i dont know what else it could have been. i wasnt drunk or obnoxious or anything for him to single me out like that.

              3. sitting in a restaurant, and some kind of panhandler comes over to beg for water. food service in colombia is slow as fuck so i’m kind of irritatble already, and i ignore the guy. he goes off spouting expletives and i definitely hear a couple words like “negro” or “black”. i’m not too bothered, because you’re a panhandler my friend, you dont really get to say youre better than me because of the color of my skin.

              Other than that, mostly good interactions, loved the country. medellin, especially.

              • Diego Duarte

                Well, as you may or may not be aware the term “negro” is a Spanish adjective, simply meaning “black”, as in the color black, which also doubles as a noun for a black person. Since in Spanish the ending of words is determined by the masculine or feminine forms, this can vary to “negra” when describing a black woman. Same thing happens to other nounds such as “gordo” (fat), “flaco” (skinny), “chato/enano” (short). In every group there will always be someone nicknamed “el negro”, “el gordo”, “el flaco”, “el gringo”, depending on his most defining characteristics.

                Now our word “negro” was misappropiated (and horribly mispronounced btw) by Americans which took it out of context and applied it for centuries as a slur for black people. It has never truly belonged to the English language.

                Regarding your experience at the club, it was most definitely racism. Colombia did participate extensively in the transatlantic slave trade, so black Colombians are common in that country, as well as is the stereotype of black people as thieves and murderers, or drug dealers. Same thing happens in clubs here in Peru with people of indigenous ancestry, which was the group enslaved and discriminated in lieu of African slaves.

                Finally, regarding your incidence with the beggar, the word “negro” by itself isn’t racist unless followed up by another adjective such as “negro de mierda” (which rougly translates to “effing n*gger”). By itself “negro” is harmless and means nothing, but when combined by another pejorative term, then it is most likely being used to imply that somehow your blackness is cause of whatever else they’re attributing to you.

                • MajorLazer

                  Thanks for providing context. Yeah, I figured as much with your responses to each incident. These incidents definitely didnt ruin my trip or even factor in. For every one maybe incident, i had 10 people who went out of their way to help me.

          • Just went to Colombia in May. Had a great time.

            • kingpinenut

              Good friend is plotting to get me there for life.

              • Definitely gotta go when you can. I think flights can get really cheap out there too depending on where you fly from.

                • kingpinenut

                  Yeah…flights from BWI to Colombia are cheaper than flights to SFO.

                  I need real empandas in my life

                  • Haha yea man the food is great. I’m sure your friend can tell you all about it.

            • Conrad Bess

              Where exactly? I’m hoping to go January/February.

              • We went to Bogota and Medellin. Also took a day trip out to Guatape when we stayed in Medellin which I would recommend if you have time. I liked both cities a lot although they are quite different. Bogota is more of the really busy big city and has more tourist attractions. Medellin is much more laid back and there’s not quite as much to see but it’s still fun esp the night life. The people were really nice everywhere we went too. I want to go back and go to some of the beach towns.

                • Conrad Bess

                  What about Barranquilla?

                  • I don’t know as much about that place since we decided not to go there because it was too far. I know they have some interesting architecture and museums if you like that and of course the beach. Like the other person said you’d probably have a good time anywhere out there, but I can’t say how it is in comparison to the big cities.

              • Britannia Zimeisha

                For Colombia spend no more than one night in Bogota and only to go to Andres Carnes. Cali has an amazing salsa culture, Cartagena (stay in the old town) and my personal favorite Medellin (best night life). If you like outdoors then I highly recommend Rio Claro but watch out for the snakes. in general though you cant go wrong with Colombia. Its a fantastic country with the friendliest people ever.

                • Conrad Bess

                  Is Barranquilla any good?

                  • Britannia Zimeisha

                    Never been to Barranquilla since I’ve never been in Colombia during carnival season. If I were there in Feb I’d definitely go though. Passing up the chance to parade around half naked while covered in glitter would be stupid.

          • leesupreme

            I am curious why visiting Peru was one of the smartest things you have ever done? ( Just curious)

            • Conrad Bess

              I had come out of a relationship and was in a very uncomfortable state of mind. Needed to get away and experience something different. A friend suggested Chile. The friend I went with said let’s go to Peru. We did both. My travel experience was sadly lacking, and just going somewhere where I knew nothing was refreshing. It helped me get over the relationship and open my eyes to a bigger world.

              • Blueberry01

                Hmmm…interesting advice. Eat.Pray.Love (Yourself) Moment

              • leesupreme

                Thats awesome… Nothing like a little life experience to quell pain.

        • NonyaB

          Yes. Seeing adults who’ve never left even their states is a mindfxck. My brain soimply couldn’t compute the first time I came across it.

        • grownandsexy2

          Some people don’t like to travel and then there those are too poor to leave. There are people in the City of Brotherly Love who have never ventured out of their neighborhood.

          • GenevaGirl

            I’m from Philly and have met people who’ve never even crossed the bridge to Jersey. It always amazes me to meet people with no curiosity.

            • grownandsexy2

              I’ve met a few of them also. It’s just mind boggling how you can live and die in such a small parameter having never ventured out.

              • Liz

                I get it. My grandmom was the toughest woman I know, but I’ve never seen travel make a person more weary. Just like for some ppl socializing gives them energy and for others it takes it away – traveling is the same. It’s not fun for everyone.

            • Man I was born in Philly and we moved to Wilmington, Delaware when I was young our family acted like we moved across the world. And I’ve definitely heard some people from Philly say they didn’t know where Delaware was lol

              • kingpinenut

                This message is endorsed by Kingpinenut – having been a native of Wilmington, DE.

              • Liz

                Ha! I’m from the ti-state area (NJ, PA, DE), currently live in L.A. and when one of my friends out here found out my mom lives in Wilmington his first question was, “Omg, how can we get her out of there?” He was seriously worried. I actually had to explain to him that she’s okay with living in D.E.

                • Haha it’s always funny to hear what people have to say about Delaware.. if they know anything about it at all

                  • Blueberry01

                    It’s taken me 22 minutes to get from MD to the bridge once…and it has an outlet mall.

              • Blueberry01

                I’m from MD and I didn’t know where DE was. I thought it was a part of MD, forreal. Lol!

            • Liz

              It always amazes me when I meet Philadelphians when I travel. I’ve been all over the world and always seem to run into someone from Philly. It’s refreshing.

          • Gibbous

            Oh, I understand that. Also, if where you are is not so safe, you may not feel safe venturing into uncharted territories.

        • Blueberry01

          There’s people in NY who never leave their block. Literally.

      • I actually do want to go, but I’m aware that there’s a lot of fetishizing of black women down there. My friend studied abroad for a semester and said she was always called chocolate or something that had to do with her skintone.

        • L8Comer

          Yep. It’s true. The darker the better. Always reminds me of that jungle fever line where the Italians are talking about riding a woman like a horse off into the sunset

          • Val

            Yikes.

          • Late pass.. I’ve never seen it!

            • L8Comer

              Now you got your rainy day movie! It’s really funny and sad

      • L8Comer

        You may or may not even notice racism is a visit. There’s a lot of great places in the world to see, but yes they are just as racist if not more so than home. Still, don’t throw out the baby with the bath water. Accept it for what it is, a beautiful country with amazing history that’s tainted by racism.

        • NonyaB

          Yep, sooo many countries (including Canada, the US, all of S. America, Europe, etc) would be off limits if tainted history made them off-limits.

    • justtwo post

      Paris reeks of pee. It stinks worse than NYC.

      • lol

        you want to know what really stinks? the bodies from the murders in your country.

        • justtwo post

          Is this you trying to come for me or what

    • Britannia Zimeisha

      The last sentence is pure truth but if possible don’t let that stop you from seeing the world. Encountering other places, ways to live, mindsets and pathologies is educational in a way that nothing else is. You can skip London though. There’s nothing to see here.

    • leesupreme

      ayy the denial of the Afro-caribbean Diaspora … So painful. Fellow Caribbean 1st generation American -Puerto rican parents… I identify as a black women of Hispanic descent. and EVERYONE has a problem with it…. My response is usually… this isn’t a tan in reference to my skin tone- that relates to my slave bloodline. Calling myself black doesn’t make me african american, my identity doesn’t take away their experience here in America and it doesn’t make me any less Latina… or Black I don’t understand why I have to fight for both to be my simultaneous representation.

    • Unkel Ruckus

      It’s safe to be colored in Africa. That’s a fact!

  • Ess Tee

    I can’t recall who it was–if it was a journalist or what–but I remember reading about a Black American woman who’d moved to Paris. Her French wasn’t so great upon arrival, and as she learned and became a better, more proficient speaker, the treatment she received differed. French folks began lumping her in with Francophone West Africans and/or Francophone Caribbean folks. So, she began going back to infusing her French with a more American accent.

    There’s privilege in even being able to do that.

    • I remember that being a feature on This American Life on NPR, and thought of that reading Shamira’s piece. The one privilege that we as Black people in America all have is the ability to speak American English fluently. That helps a scary lot in a number of situations.

      • Ess Tee

        I had to Google that episode. I’m listening to it right now for the first time. I’m wondering if maybe I read something that referenced the episode, and that’s why it’s stayed with me.

      • Deeds

        I gotta check that one out

  • Asiyah

    I’m just going to go ahead and say it:

    I LOATHE France.

    Of all the colonial powers, France is the one I hate the most. I hate its faux secularism. I hate its neoliberal policies. I hate its elitism. I hate its arrogance. I hate its faux open-mindedness. I hate the way it acts above all other countries and pretends to be a haven but is really a h*ll. I hate how it treats Black people. I hate how it treats Arabs. I hate how it treats Muslims of all ethnic backgrounds. I hate how it treats Jews. I hate how it screwed over Haiti. I hate how it slaughtered Algerians (and that’s just naming a few). I hate how it divided Lebanese government by sects. I hate it continuously meddles in ME affairs but lets the UK and the US take all the heat. I despise France. I will never step foot there.

    I won’t ever celebrate a terrorist attack in France. I’m not that kind of person. That’s despicable. But let me tell you, when your solution to everything is to continue bombing people, disrespecting them, and oppressing them, you will reap what you sow. Notice how France gets hit harder than any other European country. AND IT STILL DOESN’T LEARN! You have guys of Moroccan descent doing attacks in Paris and your solution is to continue to bomb Syria? You’re stupid and myopic. Screw you, France.

    • One of the things that bothers me about the Middle East is that the seeds of a bulk of the problems there were sown after WWI by England and France.

      • Asiyah

        Bingo. America just capitalized on it, but let’s not forget how England and France were salivating at the end of the Ottoman Empire.

        • The US just waited for the dust to clear (for the time being).

          Lawrence of Arabia flat out lied to the Prince Feisal and carved up the place after the Ottomans folded.

        • Brandon Allen

          The Ottoman was part of some of those problems as well

          • Asiyah

            Don’t get me started on those guys. Can’t stand them either. But Europe jumped at the chance when that empire finally collapsed and that’s where the (current) artificial borders come in.

          • Nothing like some ethnic cleansing to cap off a world war.

        • Word. America has done plenty of dirt in the ME, but we got in late on the game. England and France were chomping at the bit after the collapse of the Ottomans.

          • Asiyah

            While America was carrying its big stick in Latin America. We’re all just collateral damage.

            • Yes, the era of the Banana Republics. What I didn’t realize was how the Latin craze of the mid 20th Century was government propaganda to paper over that situation. United Fruit Company, the Freebooters, and all that other BS.

              • LMNOP

                Even today US policy has a huge impact on Latin America. Both the “war against drugs” and American demand for drugs are really significant factors behind the levels of violence in Central America and Mexico, not to mention the decades of violence in Colombia. And the CIA’s involvement in over-throwing multiple democratically elected leaders.

                • YAAAAS! Every time a Central/South American country seems to get on its feet, here comes the US to throw things into chaos. Again.

          • Red October

            Exactly. Plus the actively destabilized the region after the Ottomans collapsed. Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan wasn’t even countries until the British and French formed them as buffer states to protect their interest in their North African colonies (Egypt,Sudan, Libya and Algeria)

    • MsSula

      I will repeat it for the cheap seats: I LOATHE FRANCE.

      When I first moved back home, I worked for a major French company: Worst mistake of my life!!!! There is not a group of people that is most condescending, most self centered than a white French person. Boy, don’t get me started.

      • Asiyah

        I swear I can’t stand them. Only white French person I like is Albert Camus. I’ve heard great things about Franz Fanon, but can’t form an opinion just yet as I haven’t read his work so far.

  • Brooklyn_Bruin

    ” Stop saying the South”
    “It’s the same over here, as it is over there”
    “As long as you south of the Canadian border, you in the South”

    – Brother Malcolm

    A quick find and replace for a lot of his wisdom would serve in this modern era.

    • Ess Tee

      This bit: “As long as you south of the Canadian border, you in the South”

      Whenever I can, I talk about my high school history teacher from whom I’d taken Government and, later during my senior year, African American History (which was an elective. Tuh). It was in AfAmHist that he said to a bunch of 16, 17, and 18 year old Black kids, “The real Mason-Dixon line is the U.S.-Canada border.”

      I was 17 when he said that. I’m turning 37 in a couple months. It has stayed with me for two decades.

      • QueenRaven23

        Maybe if more people thought that way, then they wouldn’t be surprised when we talk about places like Chicago and Buffalo being severely segregated.

      • And then you go to Canada and find out they just as bad. *le sigh*

        • SoundsFrenchLooksCaribbean

          THIS.I live in Montreal. They just hide it better.

          • Medium Meech

            So, the french imported more than just the language?

            • SoundsFrenchLooksCaribbean

              Yup. Although, most Québécois here totally despise the French, mainly because they still have a settler mentality once they get here.

          • La Katiolaise

            Hey fellow Montrealer

            • SoundsFrenchLooksCaribbean

              Heeeeeeyyyyyyyyyy Girl! ??

        • kingpinenut

          It’s up south to the North Pole and beyond

  • bigheadbaby

    Ta-Nehisi Coates is only in France for one year. He is supposed to return to the US at the end of the year, whenever that is.

  • I saw the title when I refreshed my feedly list and immediately thought of Bomani’s interview with TNC. I remembered frowning when I read that part of it because it reminded me of a few conversations that I’ve had on twitter with people on here and in real life with others about how some black folks felt about France.

    • miss t-lee

      I thought about that article as well.

      • I remember thinking Bruh, I think you’re glossing over some sh*t. People talk about France the same way people who love football talk about it. You know there are horrible parts of it but choose to ignore the extra bad things.

        • miss t-lee

          For real.

More Like This