It’s Official: Bill Cosby Is Out Of His Gotdamn Mind » VSB

Pop Culture, Race & Politics, Theory & Essay

It’s Official: Bill Cosby Is Out Of His Gotdamn Mind

Bill Cosby is out of his gotdamn mind.

This is the only thought that went through my head this morning while watching a fuschia pajamas-clad Cosby address anonymous fans on a rotary phone in a video intended on winning back the public. Because, when watching a fuschia pajamas-clad man who’s been accused of dozens of rapes address anonymous fans on a rotary phone in a video intended on winning back the public, “this dude is out of his gotdamn mind” is the only reasonable thought that can go through your head.

And, once you accept that Bill Cosby might very well be out of his gotdamn mind, things start to make sense. Black is still black. White is still white. Big Sean still sucks. And you can finish your lunch.

Filed Under:
Damon Young

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB. He is also a columnist for GQ.com And he's working on a book of essays to be published by Ecco (HarperCollins). Damon is busy. He lives in Pittsburgh, and he really likes pancakes. Reach him at damon@verysmartbrothas.com. Or don't. Whatever.

  • Portia Bustamente

    The rotary phone (is it even plugged in?), the Heaven’s Gate pajamas set, the senility wafting off every syllable coming out of his mouth…it’s a study in how not to proclaim one’s innocence, but to confirm you’re a psychopath. Crazy rapist is still crazy.

    • kid video

      LOL @ Heaven Gate…

    • Staci Elle

      Not the hell bop comet and nikes? LMAO

  • Clint Eastwood’s chair is on the other end of that phone call.

    • miss t-lee

      Listen…like what did I just watch?

  • Because nothing says “I’m not a serial rapist” like fuschia pajamas. Though I still don’t get your anti-Big Sean shade. He’s just mediocre. LOL Oh, and go measure your wife’s height. Really. Just do it.

    • miss t-lee

      Big Sean has stans?
      Who knew?

      • Big Sean is MIMs with a second album.

        • miss t-lee

          basically.

        • ghettoS

          Ouch.

        • Epsilonicus

          Reading this made me flinch. I am hurting for Big Sean lol

  • kid video

    He probably got those pajamas from Hugh Hefner…
    I don’t think he’s nut’s, just trying to show that he’s not going to hide & lay low(what OJ should have done). He still has a large fanbase and is rallying his troops.
    Not a fan of Big Sean but i’ll let him live and continue to bag bad latina chicks.

  • Good afternoon Champ,

    First, please allow me to redirect your and the rest of the forum’s focus on that which actually matters wrt Mr. Cosby; I quote from a recent piece I wrote for A Voice For Men:

    “For my money, I don’t think this is just about money, as many have suggested; no doubt, I think there is a fiduciary motive. But, as Clarence Thomas so astutely noted so long ago, I think there is a desire on the part of some of the American public, to want to silence those among the Black race, who dare to think outside the box, and to give voice to their heterodox views. Surely, by now everyone reading this will be well aware of what I am talking about with regard to Cosby; a decade ago, during a gala celebration commemorating the 50th anniversary of the famed Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, ending forever Jim Crow “separate but equal” doctrine in the country’s public schools, Cosby delivered what has become known as the “Poundcake Speech” – where Cosby was plain spoken and brutally blunt about the very real internal struggles and problems, foibles and even pathology, that beset the nation’s most vulnerable African American sections. His speech was barely over before certain voices within the Black Establishment was calling for his head on a pike, for “airing dirty laundry” within earshot of White folks. Books were written about asking if whether he was out of his mind; charges were made that he was serving the interests of racist Whites who wanted an out to visit their hatred onto Blacks; and still others charged that Cosby was “blaming the victim” – poor and lower class African Americans – instead of pointing to “systemic” forces that held them back. Overnight, Cosby was seen as a pariah by much of respectable Black America, upheld by perhaps its small but not insignificant conservative bloc for saying what needed to be said. I honestly do think there is a move afoot to sully his reputation in light of these facts, among other notable actions taken during his career – one that stands, sadly, as one of the relative few among the pantheon of Black luminaries and celebrities that has been a tireless advocate and supporter of the upliftment of Black Americans.”

    The High-Tech Lynching Of William H. Cosby
    http://www.avoiceformen.com/mens-rights/the-high-tech-lynching-of-william-h-cosby/

    The facts of the matter, are the following:

    1. No evidence has been offered against Cosby

    2. The prosecutor has made it clear that he will NOT be bringing charges against Mr. Cosby

    Instead of Negro Media focusing on the moehills, they might want to try actually learn how to climb mountains.

    More in a sec…

    O.

    • Lola

      he’s a rapist.

      • This is an opinion; not a fact. Black folks would do well to learn the difference between the two.

        As well as learning what “innocent until proven guilty” means.

        As you were…

        O.

        • Lola

          of course it’s an opinion.. just like your entire tired ‘lets stop crab barreling’ knee jerk reaction to anyone calling a prominent black male to task over their shitty actions.
          YOU would do well to learn that antiquated mantras of a criminal justice system that has shown and proved itself to be weighted heavily against the poor, powerless and non-white is nothing more than lip service.
          a non conviction, does NOT in fact {since you’re so big on facts} equate to innocence.
          a non-charge doesn’t in fact equate to innocence.
          tuh.

        • Kimwrites

          “innocent until proven guilty” isn’t relevant in the court of public opinion.

          As you were….

          • @Kim:
            “You are entitled to your opinions; you are entitled to your own facts.”
            -Daneil Patrick Moynihan

            Are we learning yet? ;)

            Carry on…

            O.

            • Kimwrites

              I’m entitled to my own facts and opinions? Sweet! Thanks for sharing.

              • @Kim:

                Because, repetition is the mother of learning:

                “You are entitled to your opinions; you are not entitled to your own facts.”
                -Daniel Patrick Moynihan

                Are we learning yet? ;)

                And, you’re most welcome. :)

                O.

                • Kimwrites

                  Oh, I know the quote.You should be taking those words to heart as well. What facts do you you have?

                  “I wanna see the receipts”
                  –Whitney Houston

                  • @Kim:
                    What facts do I have, as it relates to Cosby?

                    1. Prosecutors have said that they won’t be bringing any charges against him.

                    2. No evidence has been presented supporting ANY of the ladies’ claims of assault on Cosby’s part – just assertions, and accusations. Again, given the long and sordid history involving Black men in this society, one would think that if anyone would take these claims with a grain of salt, Black Americans, in this case, Black women, would. My, how things have changed.

                    You were saying…?

                    O.

                    • Kimwrites

                      That’s in only a few cases of the women who actually went to the police. And in the case of Andrea Constand, the prosecutor in that case said its not that he didn’t believe her and that he thought Cosby did it but it would be difficult to prove.

                      And I am well aware of America’s sordid history of lynching black men off a lie. But I can acknowledge those false claims of the past AND recognize the truth when I hear it.

                      Sometimes, its not some big conspiracy by white folks to bring us down, sometimes we are brought down by our own personal demons.

                    • @Kim: I didn’t say anything about “White folks” other than the White women who accused him. My argument is that there are many BLACK people, who don’t like that Cosby went off the Black Borg Hivemind reservation, and wouldn’t have a problem seeing him get his comeuppance for it.

                      As for the “truth” you claim to see, it’s all in your mind – not the facts. Again.

                      Why are you stanning so hard for White women – after all, by all accounts, they want less than nothing to do with you or Sistas in general. Just ask the Black feminists…

                      O.

        • It is indeed an opinion, but when it comes to the media and the story being covered, all that matters is public opinion, and I emphasize that word “opinion.” It was the same thing with Casey Anthony: in the realm of public opinion she was guilty, but unlike Cosby, she had the capability to disappear.

          Cosby, the “man” is innocent until proven guilty; Cosby the “character” (the only one the media can present to us) is guilty as sin. Not because there’s real world evidence (the victims are characters too, just like Cosby – they are playing roles), but because the stories of the victims are better than his. His story is mostly that of silence and then addressing the world in pajamas to promote his show. In real life, it’s a blunder at the least, careless at the most; but in the realm of the media it’s an admission of guilt and borderline sociopathy nevertheless.

          In the end, if you don’t know Cosby, you don’t know Cosby.

          • @NL:
            I concur.

            But – and I say this because VSB IS considered part of the Black Media now – what role does its staff play here? I mean, it’s one thing to do a hastily written op/ed; something else to present ONLY that, and nothing even coming close to actual, you know, journalism. What responsibility does VSB and other ostensibly Black media outlets have, in actually getting out the facts and the truth? What is up with that?

            Your response?

            Anyone?

            O.

            • Lol, I think you think too highly of the modern journalist profession.

              http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1503254364/amazon0156-20/

              But I get your point, and I think it’s a matter of what the staff at VSB wants to be, as well as what appeals to it’s audience I suppose.

              • @NL:
                But that’s just it, and is the point I made in my recent column on the Negro Media: they don’t have any respect for the truth or the facts. It’s like they and we, are perfectly content with how we “feel” about something, as if that is the determinant as to whether something is valid or not. It really is a slap in the face to those Black journos who actually tried to do, you know, journalism.

                O.

                • I think the problem with how you’re looking at it, is you’re coming from the perspective that the Black media is somehow exempt from the laws of the mainstream media. There is a difference in audiences of course, but they are not exempt from the trends and methodologies involved in the business of journalism.

                  If CNN, a mainstream giant in journalism, sees no need to actually have an investigative department and relies on trends in twitter, many times to decide whether or not a story should be covered, I don’t see anything shocking about the black media following suit.

                  It’s easy to blame the media, as it is always easy to blame or accuse an abstraction that by it’s nature cannot defend itself…the truth is that, the lack of truth seeking, is a reflection of the demands of the audience, the only group who have a concrete reality in the situation(as TLP likes to say “You are being deceived…by yourself”). Just like society, the media is a reflection and mirror of the people; it’s just easier to make accusations towards them, since they never respond, sort of like shadow boxing.

                  • @NL:

                    Your response is interesting, because if true, it directly contradicts the entire premise of Citizen Journalism, which was at the heart of my recent column on the matter; I quote:

                    “One of the reasons why I became utterly turned off from the Negrosphere Media was because of its irrelevance to my life and the lives I see being lived by ordinary, everyday Black folk. Because of the rigid adherence to ideological purity that doesn’t allow for the questioning of anything outside of “the narrative.” Because of the seeming fascination with what can only be referred to as Coonery, gossip and obsession with fame, celebrity and acting a fool. Simply put, I got sick and tired of being sick and tired of being Black and not being able to actually get serious journalism on matters that matter to me and mine from people who look like me.

                    So, I decided to do something about it – I became what some call a Citizen Journalist. I got myself a few laptops, a smartphone, learned about blogging and social media (after teaching myself to type and use the Internet), and got busy – first blogging, and then writing copy for outlets like The Spearhead and A Voice For Men. I cofounded a Men’s Issues blog collective. I became a frequent commenter at some of the biggest websites of their kind around.

                    I got involved.”

                    http://www.avoiceformen.com/men/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-ebony-empire-proves-that-the-negrosphere-media-is-irrelevant/

                    Your response?

                    O.

                  • esa

                    ~ Just like society, the media is a reflection and mirror of the people; it’s just easier to make accusations towards them, since they never respond, sort of like shadow boxing.

                    do you have suggestions for creating accountability ? or is it simply a matter of turning off, tuning out, and waiting for the numbers to drop until said MSM outlet disappears ?

                    • Lol, no, I’m far and away for Alan Watt and many others who would advocate such a thing.

                      It’s just that an abstraction is something that cannot actually change, it has no actual existence to change it in the first place or to hold accountable. Society changes when the individuals change; the media changes when the demands and desires of the audience change…and in both cases, the changes are not noticeable from up-top as they are occurring.

                      It’s like those who say “I’m going to end world poverty!” Yet, they have poor people 50 yards from their house begging for change. Wouldn’t they be doing more helping that guy, who is a breathing human being that they can touch and feel, vs. the world’s poor, who they don’t know anything about and will probably never reach in their lifetime? Many of them pursue such things, because they know they cannot be done. They are more motivated by achieving the impossible, since they crave recognition and desire to make history, more so than actually do the work and achieve the result that they set out to accomplish.

    • Champ,

      Speaking of Negrosphere Media…

      In light of you and Panama’s recent visit up to Harvard U, along with Prof. Brittney Cooper and the founder of For Harriet to discuss Black Media Matters, I offer the following recent column of mine, where I give my unique take on the state of Negro Media:

      I quote:

      “While the Cathedral Media still reels from revelations that Nightly News anchor Brian Williams made up stories of combat during his time in Iraq and the pincers seem to be closing in on Fox’s Bill O’Reilly, what seems to get left out of the mix is just how badly Black news media has fared over the past few decades. The vast majority of it could hardly be called “real” journalism – at best, they are advocacy pieces, centered around “uplift” themes that aim to show Black folk in its best light – at worst, the big names in the business – from OWN to BET to NewsOne and Essence, Ebony, MadameNoire and Clutch, peddle in celebrity gossip that isn’t fit to line the proverbial dog kennel with.

      Aside from the fact that the lady heads of the Johnson Publishing Co. have “leaned” it into the ground due largely to the kinds of incompetence that Black elite leadership is notorious for, and the general news media continues to devolve into irrelevance, a real burning question for guys like me have another to consider:

      Who are telling the stories that matter in Black America? Is it the Negrosphere Media?

      “Negrosphere” – that is my term for the aforementioned gaggle of “news” organizations of varying stripe, that in their own ways, purport to reflect the Black America that is today. Yet, one is hard pressed to think up any Black equivalents to Woodward and Bernstein, Mark Bowden or Steve Lopez, Ernie Pyle or David Simon, or George Anastasia. Sure, there are Black journos out there who are putting in standard AP copy on the regular, but what are they really saying? Are they really speaking truth to power? Or are they just getting along to go along?

      Last summer, ESPN personality Stephen A. Smith came close to doing just that, when he gave his take on the-then raging controversy surrounding former Baltimore running back Ray Rice and his newlywed wife, Janay. Smith dared to suggest that it could be possible that women, in this case Black, could play a role in the violence that goes on in domestic situations between couples, something that is indeed well documented. For his daring to notice actual reality, he was quickly punished.

      And he’s not alone: last month, during a panel discussion on Black fatherhood, The Nightly Show host Larry Wilmore dared to raise the question as to whether one of the reasons why the Black marital rate was so low might have had to do with so many Black women being so “bossy” – he immediately apologized, did his mea culpas, and just recently, had on an all-Black woman panel to discuss how oh-so-hard they have it.

      The message is clear: Black journos, especially if they happen to be male, simply are not to question out loud anything that might make Black folks, and especially Black women, look bad. This accounts for the utter lack of reporting about the rampant corruption, malfeasance, incompetence and in-your-face nepotism that is par for the course in any Black precinct you can think of in America. I mean, let’s keep it brutally 100 – with all that goes on in Black America along these lines, not even including the daily bloodletting, one would think that there would be at least a few Black journos out there doing Pulitzer-level work, reporting on the reality that is urban America’s gritty streets.”

      The rise and fall of the Ebony empire proves that the Negrosphere media is irrelevant

      http://www.avoiceformen.com/men/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-ebony-empire-proves-that-the-negrosphere-media-is-irrelevant/

      I’ll have more to say about the state of Negro Media in future installments. Stay tuned…

      O.

    • Here’s my thing about Bill Cosby. He does have a right to perform and be free. In the most rock solid case against him, the alleged victim didn’t have the foresight to promptly get a rape kit done. That said, 13 other women were willing to stand up and name him as a rapist without putting their names on the record. It’s hard to get a check when people don’t know who you are.

      Now is he free to live his life as he wishes? Sure! He’s never been convicted of a crime, and has the same rights of anyone similarly situated. That said, that many women over that long a period of time in that many different situations is at minimum very suspicious. I’m in agreement that his politics probably greased the skids of his fall a bit. Still, at minimum, he has some piss poor judgement of women. Besides, people get away with murder, rape and other horrible crimes all of the time. Heck, one only needs to look at Marvin Harrison’s story in Philly to see that happen, and he wasn’t a political figure of any stretch. Bill Cosby is free to live, but I don’t have to f*ck with him.

      • @Todd:
        Let me clear: the issue I’m having isn’t that people, and that includes those who are now deemed to be representatative of the Black Media, have the right to give voice to their opinion – rather, THATS ALL THE BLACK MEDIA SEEMS TO BE DOING. It’s almost as if the facts, or the truth, simply doesn’t matter – and this is hugely important, because of the long and ugly history in our country of Black men who were railroaded and worse, merely on the whims of often White women.

        What has happened to us to where we’re willing to give the benefit of the doubt to a gaggle of White women who made claims of rape and the like that occurred as much as a half a century ago, while at the same time be oh so willing to throw a Black man under the bus, merely because we disagree with his political and/or social views? Note what’s happened to Dr. Ben Carson, once the darling of Respectable Bougies, now a pariah. It’s really weird, like witnessing the Black version of the Borg Hivemind or something.

        The facts matter, Todd.

        The Black Media ought to keep that in mind.

        O.

        • I’m of a piece with the hive mind criticism. But I’m not so partisan as to not see what’s in front of my own face.

      • Whether Cosby did it or not, or is guilty or not, the story we’ve been presented, has Bill Cosby as being guilty, and in anything have to deal with the media, all that matters is the narrative or story being told.

        However, the story isn’t reality, the media cannot present reality, no matter how hard it tries to present itself as, and the more people try to find reality from a story, the more they get deceived by it and the more they rely on passion to replace actual knowledge which is grounded in images and videos (Reality can’t be captured in an image, or in a bunch of images…the best you can get is propaganda). Yet, the passion around this story, is mostly due to the fact that people are acting as though they know what really happened, and are of course, unwilling and unlikely to do what is required to arrive at that: investigate on their own terms.

        Where I disagree with @disqus_IPU6vpG8iu:disqus, is he is saying that journalists or the black media should be looking into the facts of this case, I disagree because based on what I see, since we are in a postmodern age, the money is in the story making, not in the expression of facts or discovery of truth. There are those who do do that, but I doubt those who are, see any value in the truth of the Cosby case, and honestly, in the grand scheme of important things in life, Cosby is only important in the context of his story. Whether Cosby is found guilty or innocent, it will have little impact on reality as a whole.

        • @NL:
          In light of your remarks, two questions emerge:

          1. Why wouldn’t Black journos or other Black media figures, do their job?

          2. Why are they spending so much time on the Cosby story, in light of the fact that they’ve done so little in the way of actually gathering facts?

          O.

          • The answer to both of your questions is Reuters and the Associated Press. I don’t think that the black media differs from the MSM outside of it’s emphasis on black-centric issues, but I still think methodologies are pretty much the same. And from the top down, facts no longer matter, outside of the construction of myths.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9FaIyc4vpU

            • @NL:
              Agreed – and to be fair, I’m asking kinda-sorta rhetorical questions. I do so because I’ve learned that very often, people don’t really think through how and why they do, think and believe as they do, and questioning them tends to reveal all of this.

              At any rate, so the next question is this:

              Why is the Black media doing this? To what end? Todd seems to think that the (Black) media’s “coverage” of the Cosby story is a kind of mirror into the public mind’s take on s*xual politics issues in our time, and that it reviles what Cosby represents – a throwback to a previous era. If that’s true, it then raises all manner of really juicy questions.

              Please, ask me how…

              O.

              • @NL:
                Also, let me say this:

                I’ve noticed a very nasty tendency on the part of quite a few Black folks, to respond to any query as to the whys and hows of Black folk, that “White people do it too!” – as if that somehow absolves the BSery of Blacks or something. It matters not one whit to me what Whites do or don’t do; it matters greatly to me what Blacks do or don’t do. Uttering that Whites do it too, is in truth, really only a copout, and a cheap one at that.

                John H. Johnson must be doing somersaults in his grave.

                O.

          • Question

            Question: when did it become the job of Black journos to dive in and “clear” Cosby’s name (assuming that is possible)?

            Is that really what we want from black journalism – media-focused superheroes who fly around in their capes attempting to clear the names of any Black individual accused of anything?

            • “Question: when did it become the job of Black journos to dive in and “clear” Cosby’s name (assuming that is possible)?”

              It isn’t; it IS their job to get the facts and report on THAT – not peddle in hastily made and ideologically blinkered bloviating.

              “Is that really what we want from black journalism – media-focused superheroes who fly around in their capes attempting to clear the names of any Black individual accused of anything?”

              Why not – that’s what they did in the cases of Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin, after all…

              O.

        • I see your point about narratives, but I don’t say that they’re completely independent of the facts. My opinion is that the stories we tell ourselves tend to be revealing of what we are really thinking. It’s like Tony Montana said in Scarface: I tell the truth even when I lie.

          In Bill Cosby’s case, we have a symbol of our changing $exual mores. In many ways was Bill Cosby was a traditionalist. Not only did he stand up for old school moral values, what he did with his womanizing, how he did it and his treatment of women was par for the course in that era, particularly for any man with juice. While most of the dudes who acted like that didn’t rape anyone, this post-2nd wave feminist era looks at what he did as the bad old days. Is it fair? Probably not. But it reflects how we view ourselves.

          This isn’t to cosign his allegations of $exual assault. What I will say is that this struck a nerve in that it reflects our conflicts in our wide open $exual marketplace.

          • @Todd:
            OK, so let’s pursue this line of argument you’ve opened up. You seem to be saying that what’s really driving all the Sturm Und Drang behind the Cosby case is that it, sans any evidence, offends our Brave New World sensibilities; that Cosby’s mode of doing things is something we supposedly find offensive. Do I have that right? Because if I do, I have another question for you…

            O.

            • I wouldn’t go sans any evidence, because there were depositions and interviews and such that have gone on over the years. That said, I do believe the reaction is among one of many disparate but related reactions in society such as the rise of the Manosphere, Tumblr feminism, the popularity of kink and the particular focus of how the feminist establishment is concerned about rape (and notice that I used the term “feminist establishment” because if your question is along the lines of what I think, that term will be important).

              • @Todd:
                Depositions and interviews are not evidence, if they were, Cosby would have had his day in court already.

                Moreover, I’m interested to know how “the rise of the Manosphere” has a role to play in the enmasse kneeejerking reaction to Cosby; please explain?

                As for the feminist establishment…

                It occurs to me that if there is any problem here, its that we don’t seem to like that guys like Cosby can run through women like a roll of toilet tissue, yet we’re perfectly cool with women conducting themselves as loosely as they like; indeed, somehow that’s seen as some sort of triumph. In order for your argument to work, one has to take into account the fact that we seem to want to demonize old world conventions in the form of men like Cosby, while at the same time upholding the right of women to be as lowdown as they like, while at the same time demanding that men, and in this case i particular Black men, to tow old world party lines when it comes to Black women. Ask me how, and I’ll be more than happy to elaborate…

                O.

                • There are two overarching trends that people aren’t really paying complete attention to that people are reacting to subconsciously. One is that we have a culture where within consent anything is possible, but without it, nothing is possible. Like I mentioned to NL, a lot of past $exual interactions will be judged harshly in this new light. Much of it is deserved in my opinion, but some of it truly isn’t.

                  The other is that in light of the social chaos unleashed by an anything goes $exual culture, we have decided to raise our kids in a way to protect them from any and all disorder, despite much disorder affecting their lives. As a result, we have kids who have been raised in hothouse environments, unable to deal with the slightest bump from sheer lack of experience. A decent chunk of your readership comes from men who have been hurt and traumatized and are looking for a way to negotiate the world. Many of them are inspired by knowledge of masculinity of the past Personally, I think a lot of babies were thrown out with bathwater in the fight for women’s liberation, but that’s just me.

                  On the flip side, you have a lot of young girls and women without a language to deal with the troubles of their life, as they have been isolated too much from anything that isn’t Uplifting. They stumble onto Foucault and Lacan in the AP English class they were railroaded into, and now they have a language that reflects their fears, even if they don’t really know what it means.

                  Plus the rise of FSOG is reflective of one thing above all else, the need to place some sort, any sort, of structure around making rituals. Christian Grey may be an abusive a$$hole but at least you know what the rules of engagement are.

                  Finally, a quick note about $exual assault. It’s telling that women off campus are 60% more likely to be victimized than college students, but the buzz is on campus. Look at the military where women are roughly 20% of the Force, but 45‰ of the $exual assaults. If it wasn’t for politicians making a stink, the issue wouldn’t have gotten much shine. And of course, there’s the prison issues.

                  I was reading the work of Katie Roiphe which inspired my new line of thinking. She has written that she finds in interesting that $exual assault became a big deal just as campuses were getting more integrated, and that geographic and class diversity became more prominent. Perhaps the real issue goes back to the beginning, a complete last of structure and the desire for that structure.

                • There are two overarching trends that people aren’t really paying complete attention to that people are reacting to subconsciously. One is that we have a culture where within consent anything is possible, but without it, nothing is possible. Like I mentioned to NL, a lot of past $exual interactions will be judged harshly in this new light. Much of it is deserved in my opinion, but some of it truly isn’t.

                  The other is that in light of the social chaos unleashed by an anything goes $exual culture, we have decided to raise our kids in a way to protect them from any and all disorder, despite much disorder affecting their lives. As a result, we have kids who have been raised in hothouse environments, unable to deal with the slightest bump from sheer lack of experience. A decent chunk of your readership comes from men who have been hurt and traumatized and are looking for a way to negotiate the world. Many of them are inspired by knowledge of masculinity of the past Personally, I think a lot of babies were thrown out with bathwater in the fight for women’s liberation, but that’s just me.

                  On the flip side, you have a lot of young girls and women without a language to deal with the troubles of their life, as they have been isolated too much from anything that isn’t Uplifting. They stumble onto Foucault and Lacan in the AP English class they were railroaded into, and now they have a language that reflects their fears, even if they don’t really know what it means.

                  Plus the rise of FSOG is reflective of one thing above all else, the need to place some sort, any sort, of structure around making rituals. Christian Grey may be an abusive a$$hole but at least you know what the rules of engagement are.

                  Finally, a quick note about $exual assault. It’s telling that women off campus are 60% more likely to be victimized than college students, but the buzz is on campus. Look at the military where women are roughly 20% of the Force, but 45‰ of the $exual assaults. If it wasn’t for politicians making a stink, the issue wouldn’t have gotten much shine. And of course, there’s the prison issues.

                  I was reading the work of Katie Roiphe which inspired my new line of thinking. She has written that she finds in interesting that $exual assault became a big deal just as campuses were getting more integrated, and that geographic and class diversity became more prominent. Perhaps the real issue goes back to the beginning, a complete last of structure and the desire for that structure.

                  • @Todd:

                    You’ve made a lot of really powerful points that I want to respond to; in order to do that, I’m going to take them in turn, one at a time:

                    “There are two overarching trends that people aren’t really paying complete attention to that people are reacting to subconsciously. One is that we have a culture where within consent anything is possible, but without it, nothing is possible. Like I mentioned to NL, a lot of past $exual interactions will be judged harshly in this new light. Much of it is deserved in my opinion, but some of it truly isn’t.”

                    Hmm…interesting point, but with “Yes Means Yes” and its rapid spread all over the globe, “affirmative consent” isn’t just something that is completely on the onus of men to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt, it can very well be revoked at any time by the woman in question – including completely after the fact.

                    As for consent in sexual situations in the past – if that’s the case, that in the past there were a lot of things done that were oh-so-reprehensible, there would be no market for all the iterations of Romance and Erotica, which is really Porn for Women. Much of it is set in period-piece fashion, where the conventions of the past are very much a part of the plot.

                    “The other is that in light of the social chaos unleashed by an anything goes $exual culture, we have decided to raise our kids in a way to protect them from any and all disorder, despite much disorder affecting their lives. As a result, we have kids who have been raised in hothouse environments, unable to deal with the slightest bump from sheer lack of experience. A decent chunk of your readership comes from men who have been hurt and traumatized and are looking for a way to negotiate the world. Many of them are inspired by knowledge of masculinity of the past Personally, I think a lot of babies were thrown out with bathwater in the fight for women’s liberation, but that’s just me.”

                    Indeed. At any rate, I think what you’re talking about is really a matter of Race & Class – what I refer to as the Miss Anne Problem. Heather MacDonald discusses this to a goodly extent; she refers to it as Neo-Victorianism:

                    http://www.weeklystandard.com/articles/neo-victorianism-campus_810871.html

                    As it relates to the Black people I see and know in day to day life, really none of what you’ve said above actually applies to them; indeed, if anything, their kids are more akin to wild flowers in the forest. And there’s really no incisive discourse concerning them either.

                    As for men in our time, and my audience (which isn’t just made up of men, by the way): yes, I think you’re onto something, many men have indeed been hurt and traumatized, BY WOMEN, and it is time we recognize and validated that. That said, I have very real questions as to the methods of my colleagues in terms of getting their message out and winning hearts and minds…but that’s another discussion for another day.

                    More in a sec…

                    O.

                  • @Todd:

                    You’ve made a lot of really powerful points that I want to respond to; in order to do that, I’m going to take them in turn, one at a time:

                    “There are two overarching trends that people aren’t really paying complete attention to that people are reacting to subconsciously. One is that we have a culture where within consent anything is possible, but without it, nothing is possible. Like I mentioned to NL, a lot of past $exual interactions will be judged harshly in this new light. Much of it is deserved in my opinion, but some of it truly isn’t.”

                    Hmm…interesting point, but with “Yes Means Yes” and its rapid spread all over the globe, “affirmative consent” isn’t just something that is completely on the onus of men to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt, it can very well be revoked at any time by the woman in question – including completely after the fact.

                    As for consent in s*xual situations in the past – if that’s the case, that in the past there were a lot of things done that were oh-so-reprehensible, there would be no market for all the iterations of R*mance and Er*tica, which is really P*rn for Women. Much of it is set in period-piece fashion, where the conventions of the past are very much a part of the plot.

                    “The other is that in light of the social chaos unleashed by an anything goes $exual culture, we have decided to raise our kids in a way to protect them from any and all disorder, despite much disorder affecting their lives. As a result, we have kids who have been raised in hothouse environments, unable to deal with the slightest bump from sheer lack of experience. A decent chunk of your readership comes from men who have been hurt and traumatized and are looking for a way to negotiate the world. Many of them are inspired by knowledge of masculinity of the past Personally, I think a lot of babies were thrown out with bathwater in the fight for women’s liberation, but that’s just me.”

                    Indeed. At any rate, I think what you’re talking about is really a matter of Race & Class – what I refer to as the Miss Anne Problem. Heather MacDonald discusses this to a goodly extent; she refers to it as Neo-Victorianism:

                    http://www.weeklystandard.com/articles/neo-victorianism-campus_810871.html

                    As it relates to the Black people I see and know in day to day life, really none of what you’ve said above actually applies to them; indeed, if anything, their kids are more akin to wild flowers in the forest. And there’s really no incisive discourse concerning them either.

                    As for men in our time, and my audience (which isn’t just made up of men, by the way): yes, I think you’re onto something, many men have indeed been hurt and traumatized, BY WOMEN, and it is time we recognize and validated that. That said, I have very real questions as to the methods of my colleagues in terms of getting their message out and winning hearts and minds…but that’s another discussion for another day.

                    More in a sec…

                    O.

                    • @Todd:

                      “On the flip side, you have a lot of young girls and women without a language to deal with the troubles of their life, as they have been isolated too much from anything that isn’t Uplifting. They stumble onto Foucault and Lacan in the AP English class they were railroaded into, and now they have a language that reflects their fears, even if they don’t really know what it means.”

                      Again, this is largely a problem of the Young Ms. Anns of America – not of most Black women, who, I often remind our erstwhile Black feminist sisters, are among, if not the most s*xually liberated cohort of women in American life, and have been for quite some time now. It isn’t a problem we can or should be concerned with. Simply put, we have other fish to fry.

                      “Plus the rise of FSOG is reflective of one thing above all else, the need to place some sort, any sort, of structure around making rituals. Christian Grey may be an abusive a$$hole but at least you know what the rules of engagement are.”

                      Hmm…I saw “Fifty Shades” in a different light – one that actually has done the world’s menfolk a huge favor. More on this in a future column…

                      More in a sec…

                      O.

                    • @Todd:

                      “Finally, a quick note about $exual assault. It’s telling that women off campus are 60% more likely to be victimized than college students, but the buzz is on campus. Look at the mi litary where women are roughly 20% of the Force, but 45‰ of the $exual assaults. If it wasn’t for politicians making a stink, the issue wouldn’t have gotten much shine. And of course, there’s the prison issues.”

                      Nobody cares what happens to men in the joint, Black ones least of all. And again, this is a Young Ms. Anns of America issue. Where are the Black Journos on any of this? I’ll tell you were: MIA.

                      “I was reading the work of Katie Roiphe which inspired my new line of thinking. She has written that she finds in interesting that $exual assault became a big deal just as campuses were getting more integrated, and that geographic and class diversity became more prominent. Perhaps the real issue goes back to the beginning, a complete last of structure and the desire for that structure.”

                      Roiphe left out one very important factor: RACE. That Hollaback! NYC video last year, you know what I’m talking about? That makes the point:

                      Ms. Ann in Harlem: The naked, stopdown racism Of Hollback!’s “Social Justice Warriors”

                      http://www.avoiceformen.com/sexual-politics/ms-ann-in-harlem-the-naked-stopdown-racism-of-hollbacks-social-justice-warriors/

                      O.

                    • @Todd:

                      By the way, since you bring up K*nk, I thought you might be interested in my maiden voyage into the world of literary criticism:

                      Pushing Feminista Jones’ buttons: A book review

                      http://www.avoiceformen.com/sexual-politics/evo-psych/pushing-feminista-jones-buttons-a-book-review/

                      O.

          • No not at all, narratives are indeed based somewhat on facts (narrative, stories, myths are all synonyms for story-telling, based on a slight and often incomplete understanding of an event), but the problem lies in the fact that they are the rationalization of facts used to tell a story that we want to be, even though there is no way of testing or verifying it, which is how we arrive at truth.

            I think the story of hypocrisy sells, and that’s the appeal of the Cosby case. And we live in a generation that loves to find hypocrisy in others who are famous, and as a way of avoiding being accused of hypocrisy, choose not to have any strong beliefs or principles about anything, only strong criticisms of people who are perceived to be in power. And that’s where the media is, the media is always a reflection of the audience: if the audience wants truth, the media will go find it, not out of some moral obligation, but because advertisers run the show. If the audience wants a narrative, then they’ll get a narrative, and that’s what Cosby is.

            A real life, just like yours or mine, isn’t a narrative though. And if people really want to know what actually happened between Cosby and those 30+ women, they’re going to have to stop looking for narratives and seek to understand actual events. But, we all know few people, including myself, have little interest in what actually happened.

            • @NL:

              “I think the story of hypocrisy sells, and that’s the appeal of the Cosby case. And we live in a generation that loves to find hypocrisy in others who are famous, and as a way of avoiding being accused of hypocrisy, choose not to have any strong beliefs or principles about anything, only strong criticisms of people who are perceived to be in power. And that’s where the media is…”

              Boom!–and I think this is as much a part of the “story” as Todd’s theory about changing socios*xual mores wrt Cosby and what (he is perceived) to represent.

              I am often accused of being highly judgmental – something that I not only wouldn’t challenge or find fault with, but I openly embrace. I come from a world where judgments come early and often, where judgment calls MUST be made; I find, that those who tend to do the most of what you’re talking about, tend to exist in spaces and places where they really don’t have to make any kind of judgment calls that actually matter in the final accounting. It is indeed an easy kind of copout.

              As always, powerful observations, sir!

              O.

            • FWIW few people are interested because it would reveal how much our values have changed, and force us to reassess a lot of old things by modern standards. That’s why the full details will never get out. Women were expected to be much more conservative in their intentions, and ain’t no one got time for that in this day and age.

            • esa

              ~ But, we all know few people, including myself, have little interest in what actually happened.

              may i ask, what interests you about this case ?

              • The passion that people have for it, despite the fact that few really are willing to dig deep and actually come to understand what actually happened.

                • esa

                  interesting. but, may i ask, where would one begin digging without access to the individuals themselves ? are you suggesting we investigate the members of the media participating in this campaign ?

                  • Actually, I think they can have access to the individuals, at least as much as the individuals themselves are willing to talk to people. There’s never been a period in time, where it was easier for a regular person to gain access to another person; plus there’s so much vanity in our age, that most people are willing to share their secret lives to the world for free.

                    The media is only interested in what they can use to create a story, since that’s the only thing the medium can do.

                    • esa

                      ~ Actually, I think they can have access to the individuals, at least as much as the individuals themselves are willing to talk to people.

                      only if NDAs have not been signed. also there’s the matter of the people reporting the crimes are having their identities withheld by the court.

                      ~ plus there’s so much vanity in our age, that most people are willing to share their secret lives to the world for free.

                      this isn’t a vanity story in the sense you speak, meaning that the accusers are not using this case for fame and money on the front end (otherwise the names would be released. dont you think ABC News et al have thrown millions in the hopes of getting the exclusive ?)

                      ~ The media is only interested in what they can use to create a story, since that’s the only thing the medium can do.

                      dont you think the media is worth investigating as well ? there’s a level of complicity that few speak, but Lord the stories i been hearing lately done make my head swim.

                    • There’s a book I recommended to @Obsidian about the journalist profession, and how it actually is, compared to the image people have of it – it’s never been a noble profession, and has always primarily been more so in the entertainment business than the truth-seeking business: hell Pulitzer, who is responsible for one of the highest rewards and recognitions in journalism, was in fact one of the founders of yellow journalism! So yeah, people can investigate the media I suppose, but it’s only those that are caught up in the illusion of what it is that are going to be shocked by what they find.

                      When I used the word vanity, I don’t think money or the desire for it, makes someone vain, that’s more so an after thought. The simple fact that someone seeks to put their personal life out there for public consumption is what I’m talking about. It’s true that the ABC’s of the world are always seeking a story, and it will dangle $$$, but the moment they have you on tape, they own your story. They can cut and paste whatever they need and put it on TV. If they could do that to the late Michael Jackson back in the day with that documentary (where he purposely filmed the filmmaker), how much more so, can they do that to a civilian?

      • You called out #88 by name… Jah Bless

    • Petty Levert

      33 women are all telling small variations of the same story. These accusations are not something new and have been floating around since the 90’s. At some point we have to pull our head out of the sand, separate the man from his works and his legacy, and finally admit to the fact that there is definitely something wrong here and that your favorite T.V. dad is a serial rapist.

      • @Petty:
        Nyet. The reasoning you’re advocating is not sound, nor logical, and certainly not legal. Indeed, it has been exactly that kind of hysterical “thinking” that has led to hundreds, if not thousands, of Black men being “strange fruit” swinging from trees. The legal system, as admittedly flawed as it is, exists as it does for a reason – to ferret out the truth and the facts from appeals to the mob.

        Again: what is the role of the Black Media here – to assist in getting the truth out, or to assist in ginning up the mob? It’s almost as if so many Blacks like you are saying that the facts don’t matter or something – a development that I personally find galling to tell you the truth.

        O.

        • Petty Levert
          • @Petty:
            Right – because we all get our marching orders from Mr. West. I’ll take your GIF to mean that you have no credible response to my argument.

            :)

            O.

            • Petty Levert

              No I just realized that you’re that misogynist, feminist hating person that runs that website for whiny assed men and I don’t feel like getting my pressure up listening to your one-sided bullsh!t. Be well.

              • ATTN: All Black women and feminists far and wide:

                1. Disagreement with you =/= “misogynist”, “hate”, or even “dislike” – it merely means DISAGREEMENT.

                2. When and if a Black man disagrees with you publicly, YOU WILL NOT DIE. Take slow, deep, even breaths. You will live. Carry on.

                3. Men’s issues and Men’s rights are VERY REAL. Take some time to learn about the ways and hows. Doing so will NOT result in you being ill. Quite the contrary, you will be enlightened as to what it means to be for “justice for all”.

                Comment & reply, holla – oh, and do try to come correct with an actual argument this time?

                ;)

                O.

                • Petty Levert

                  Not wanting to walk over a bridge to nowhere is not the same as not having an argument. I will not go in circles with someone who very stubbornly refuses to face facts. I’m not going to engage with a person whose answer to an issue like this is to bring up black men and false rape allegations from way back. Unfortunately in situations like this, SOME black people refuse to think critically and they think emotionally and expect others to do the same. I WILL NOT just diminish the fact that OVER 30 WOMEN (black and white) have all said the SAME THING. There is only so many times that something is said until you have to put aside emotions and use your brain. That’s all I have to say on this subject I will no longer engage with you. Good day sir.

                  • @Petty:

                    “Not wanting to walk over a bridge to nowhere is not the same as not having an argument.”

                    No – having an opinion, is NOT having an argument. Arguments are made on the basis of facts. Not theories. Not emotive opinions. Facts.

                    “I will not go in circles with someone who very stubbornly refuses to face facts.”

                    Please see above. You have presented no facts. Hard to “go in circles” in light of that…fact.

                    “I’m not going to engage with a person whose answer to an issue like this is to bring up black men and false rape allegations from way back.”

                    Ever heard of Brian Banks?

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Banks_%28American_football%29

                    Not a year passes when we don’t hear of at least one case of a Black man who was railroaded on a false rape charge, only to finally be exonerated by DNA evidence after spending years, sometimes decades, behind bars in the joint. References available upon request.

                    “Unfortunately in situations like this, SOME black people refuse to think critically and they think emotionally and expect others to do the same.”

                    Self-awareness is a big part of life. It is a rare and unusual trait among Sistas. You impress me!

                    “I WILL NOT just diminish the fact that OVER 30 WOMEN (black and white) have all said the SAME THING.”

                    This is NOT, I repeat, NOT, evidence, or facts. It is heresay. If 30 White men said that Michael Brown or Trayvon Martin were thugs, would you believe them, too? Cmon.

                    “There is only so many times that something is said until you have to put aside emotions and use your brain.”

                    Use of your brain would tell you that, just because a bunch of people say something, it does not make it true.

                    Look, back in the day, lots of people swore up and down that Bigfoot existed. They even had “proof” in the form of plaster cast feet and grainy shots of a Bigfoot-like creature running through the woods.

                    Yet, no hard and fast, smoking gun proof was ever produced. The same can be said of UFOs/alien abductions, you name it. Again, cmon, sis. You know better than this.

                    “That’s all I have to say on this subject I will no longer engage with you. Good day sir.”

                    Translation: I have lost the argument and am rightly quitting while I’m still marginally ahead.

                    Fair enough.

                    Good evening to you too, madam!

                    :)

                    O.

                    • Petty Levert

                      Lol at your assumption that I’ve lost anything. No one was competing here but you. I could actually enjoy this debate if you weren’t so distastefully arrogant.

                    • @Petty:
                      Your statement reeks of Ad Hominem – the final holdout of scoundrels, and, it would seem, at least some Black ladies. Hmm.

                      In any event, in so doing, you have reinforced your failure.

                      Good evening, madam.

                      :)

                      O.

                    • Petty Levert

                      It’s not an attack if it’s true. :)

                    • Petty Levert

                      Ahh! I see a refresher course in Logic 101 is in order.

                      Please take note:

                      “An ad hominem (Latin for “to the man” or “to the person”[1]), short for argumentum ad hominem, means responding to arguments by attacking a person’s character, rather than to the content of their arguments.”

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad_hominem

                      Assuming what you said about me was indeed true, it still does not address the discussion at hand, nor the points that I’ve made. Points, I might add, you have utterly failed to meaningfully address.

                      Besides, I thought you were “done” for the evening? Could this be a sign that your stuck on the O-Man? I’ve been known to have that effect on the ladies. They can’t seem to get enough of yours truly.

                      ;)

                      O.

                • SaiyanEliteVegeta

                  1. That’s not the point.

                  2. Who argued that?

                  3. No it’s not, your lot is mocked everywhere and even the men you try to “help” mock you because you and your ilk don’t measure to toxic forms of masculinity, the same masculinity you try to promote. Men’s Rights has no presence in any significant form anywhere, you’re like the HBD community. All bark, no bite.

                  • 1. Yes, it is. Just because you don’t think so or don’t like it, doesn’t make it so.

                    2. I am arguing that. It’s ok to disagree. Black women would do well to learn this.

                    3. Your “points” about the MRM are so woefully ignorant it beggars belief. However I’m more than happy to give you the facts on the matter, if you’re so inclined. Try me. :)

                    Carry on…

                    O.

              • Lola

                hence my farewell above.
                i have games of words with friends to ignore, and paint to watch dry, so those clearly are of more import than this woman hating dude.

                • Petty Levert

                  Lol! Girl I’m done. Like I said a bridge to no where. If there was a sworn affidavit signed by God Almighty himself saying that Cosby was a rapist, men like him would be like “but wait….” If there was a video they would be talking about how people can manipulate electronics. All men like him are concerned with are holding up appearances and holding someone down just because we share the same skin color. I’m not here for it.

                  • @Petty:
                    LOL, acts of the divine and videotaped evidence is not required to ascertain guilt or innocence here; the standard DNA testings and the like, will do. Which the accusers do not have, BECAUSE THEY FAILED TO REPORT THEIR SUPPOSED ASSAULTS TO THE POLICE IN A TIMELY FASHION – which does indeed raise eyebrows as to the veracity of their claims in the first place – now doesn’t it?

                    Hmm…

                    O.

                  • Lola

                    lol right! ‘they hired a lookalike! that ain’t, bill!’

                    • Petty Levert

                      Girl…..

                • @Lola:
                  Asserting something is so, is not the same as proving it. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Please present yours that I indeed, “hate” women?

                  I’ll wait…

                  O.

              • TeLin??

                “MISOGYNIST! RACIST!”

                Yeah. Uh-huh. Sure.

                • Petty Levert

                  Now you’re going to year old posts and commenting on them? God you’re pressed.

                  • TeLin??

                    What can I say, I’ve fallen deeply, madly in love with you. I’ve traveled the seven seas, and the Seven Sands, just to mock you.

                    So we can live happily ever after, and debate under the blue moonlight.

            • SaiyanEliteVegeta

              Or you’re talking from your ass….again.

              • howardroar

                great argument bob–keep it up

                • SaiyanEliteVegeta

                  I am to please.

                  • There’s room for improvement…

                    O.

                • Thanks…you beat me to it.

                  O.

            • sam66

              You would have to have a credible argument to start.

        • sam66

          And your rant is logical? Miss me with that foolishness.

      • JanuaryBabe

        Exactly! Serial Rapist!

        • Based on what evidence? You were saying?

          And again: WHY are Black women, rushing to the defence of largely White women, when White women have proven themselves over and over to regard Black women as little more than the proverbial “flowers in the attic”? What is up with that?

          O.

          • Question

            Maybe you haven’t been paying attention, but Black women have accused Cosby.

            The fact that we can say white women (plural, which means more than one) and black women (plural, which means more than one) have accused him, means there are at least 4 women (2 + 2) who accuse him of sexual misconduct.

            As a woman, 4 is a LOT. Way too many.

            Not enough for me to rush to judgment and want him tarred and feathered.

            But enough for me to say he’s on his own.

            • Oh, I’ve been paying very close attention to the Cosby issue, and I am very aware of the fact that there have been Black women to accuse him too. Beverly Johnson being among them.

              Perhaps you haven’t noticed that it was Black women who’ve defended him as well?

              My point stands – that, in the main, it has been mainly White women who’ve accused him of these crimes. Of course, no attempts toward presenting evidence, have been made.

              You were saying?

              O.

      • Wolf

        and 6 million thought Hitler was right..America does everything to make Black men no matter the age, look like savages..@petty you don’t see that??

        • Boom.

          O.

        • Question

          Miss me with the Hitler analogies which have no relevance to this discussion. Cosby has a problem – whether its a raping problem or just a reputational problem, I don’t care. He has a problem.

          I’m not going to go out of my way to castigate him.
          I’m not going to defend him either.
          And I am definitely not going to lecture people about not rushing to judgment.

          He just needs to stay off my radar.

        • Petty Levert
          • Epsilonicus

            I love this gif

        • sam66

          Well there are black men just like men of other races that are savages. Don’t clump all black men into this mess. Bill Cosby didn’t give a damn about black people in the early stages of his Career. Stop making excuses for improper behavior. Even if you believe he didn’t rape any of those woman he was a husband with a house full of Children (mainly daughters) his lack of respect for his wife is enough for me.

          • frances

            The fact that he hung around the Playboy mansion and cheated on his wife for a very long time should tell anyone that he is not “Cliff Huxtable.” There are other folks who knew of his predatory behavior, like fellow comedians, Frank Scotti who facilitated payments from Cosby to various women in order to squelch any negative info about Cosby and claims to have copies of money orders to support this; and Tony Hogue, a model who rescued one of his friends that Cosby drugged with the intent of taking advantage of her. The fact that there aren’t other black men–famous or wealthy and otherwise–being accused of what he’s been accused of speaks volumes. What really sickens me about Cosby is that he badmouthed poor black folks to white racists who gleefully responded, especially since Cosby didn’t address the system of white supremacy that is undeniable. Now, he’s in trouble and he wants the black community to support him. He wouldn’t spit on most of those among us who defend him if they were on fire.

    • ReadyRoc

      What bothers me is that a great many of black folks follow the same playbook and are not willing to think that this might have been orchestrated. A lot of of this goes with the fact that there are not many “pro black” or a “black community” to speak of.

      1) Bill Cosby represents patriarchy in the minds of many and anti-patriarchy is a buzz these days. Not to mention Bill Cosby came off as an aggressive father figure and many people hate the idea of a black man being so blunt and open. If Phylicia Rashad gave the same “Pound Cake” speech people would have seen it as motherly love toward the black community.
      2) Mainstream liberals and far-leftist run all the plays for black people and were offended by Cosby stepping out of pocket and suggesting that black people could change their own condition without them approving it.
      3)Even if Bill Cosby did every thing they accuse him of this never would have been this blown up if some puppet master did not make this go viral.
      4)Bill Cosby is not going to jail because everybody coming forward is past the statute of limitations.
      5) If a black man was raping white women in Hollywood since the 1960’s and the numbers are up to 30 and it may turn out to be upward 50 (since every month a new woman steps forward) then racism in America isn’t as bad as black people claim.
      6) Emotionally charged topics make people undervalue evidence and facts

      • @ReadyRoc:
        Boom!–and while we’re on the topic:

        WHY, are so many Black women, so eager to throw Bill Cosby under the bus? Given the fact that the vast majority of his accusers are White women, why are so many Sistas so put out by this, especially in light of the history of our people here? What is up with that?

        O.

        • I don’t think it’s just black women, I think it simply has to do with the intellectual structure of the black community, which is much more aligned with progressivism than conservatism from a political standpoint. The poundcake speech to me, is something I’ve heard broke guys in barbershops pretty much say and argue on a regular basis. There’s nothing in it to me that was actually profound or new, outside of the fact that it came from the character also known as Bill Cosby, who is believed to be powerful due to the fact that he was a great propagandist for the black middle class.

          I read Michael Eric Dyson’s book at the time that came out against Cosby, I was kind of disappointed then, even though I was young and really wasn’t great at untangling the book, but I could tell from reading it that he really didn’t have a solid argument against what Cosby was saying. However, he was simply restating a narrative about middle class sell-outs vs. the dispossessed urban poor (postmodernism requires that you create false dialectics and then reject the many contradictory aspects within each group to make a theory about society – which is why pretty much all sociologist books are BS). It was nothing more than a remix of the house negro vs. field negro argument.

          Anyhow, the intellectual class, which is mostly artists, journalists, professors, academicians, writers etc in the black community have always aligned more so with Dyson, and they tend to be more dedicated to the political needs of black people on a pragmatic level, in other words, political needs outweigh scholarship and truth seeking: it’s more important to support ideas that ensure or lead to political action, than worry or argue about whether such ideas are true or not. Cosby lost the support of this class, when he made that poundcake speech, and he had never made much of an effort to gain it back; it shouldn’t be surprising that they are not coming to his aid now, when he could use them, and he made the mistake of thinking they actually would.

          • @NL:

            You make a very powerful point that I discuss in my upcoming colulmn on Brittney “Prof. Crunk” Cooper, that will be published this coming Thu at A Voice For Men. Here’s an advanced excerpt of that column:

            “And this, is what is really important about today’s column: what has actually worked. Black folk like Cooper tend to remain yoked to the university ghetto, because there they don’t have to actually DO anything, PRODUCE anything; they don’t have to actually GET RESULTS for those they claim to care about and represent. All they have to do is talk a lot of silly talk, sound pithy and get daps from their fellow flatterers, unquestioned. Nor is this in any way anything new; as Thomas Sowell notes in his excellent work, “Intellectuals & Society”, that this is precisely how the academy in our time operates; not with the constrained acknowledgement of the possible, but with a grossly out of step with reality view of humanity. Simply put, there is NOTHING that will change the minds of the most eligible of Black men in American life, to partner up with a grossly obese, think she knows it all but in reality knows nothing Sista like Cooper. That should have been made brutally obvious and painfully clear by now at her age; but, you see, the power of the Female Herd Mentality is such that she can allow herself to be deluded into believing the exact opposite of what reality actually holds. Black feminists, who really take their marching orders from their White counterparts, want to “dumb down” the attractiveness standards of Black women, to their lowest point so that Black women who don’t make the cut, regardless as to how many mediorce achievements they have (after all, how hard is it to be in the African American studies department at university, hmm?), and worse, refuse to do anything about their the state of affairs they put themselves in in the first place. Even many Black women themselves know this, but they won’t openly discuss it, for fear of the Black Borg Hivemind, this time in the form of Black feminists, coming after them for it.”

            Brittney Cooper’s Very Personal “Political” Problems

            Would love to get your response…

            O.

        • SH

          Because the sexual assault rate agains African-American women is second only to Native Americans in this country. If white women aren’t safe, then we are particularly vulnerable. The fact that white women aren’t believable directly affects us because black women are even lower on the social totem pole than white women to most people. As the saying goes when white america catches a cold, black america gets the flu.

      • SaiyanEliteVegeta

        2) You misunderstand, Cosby played only to conservative white ideas that if blacks pulled up their pants, racism would go away. That the black community’s issues don’t come from institutionalized racism or issues like red-lining, but from rap music and 40’s.

        3) Do you have any evidence to back up this conspiracy?

        4) True.

        5) Yeah, you pulled that from your ass.

        6) Somewhat.

      • SaiyanEliteVegeta

        You misunderstand, Cosby played only to conservative white ideas that if blacks pulled up their pants, racism would go away. That the black community’s issues don’t come from institutionalized racism or issues like red-lining, but from rap music and 40’s.

        3) Do you have any evidence to back up this conspiracy?

        4) True.

        5) Yeah, you pulled that from your bum.

    • Nicholas Peters

      The problem with the “Poundcake Speech” the goalposts always move…how you dress, speak, etc. is pointless

      If he had come out talking about moving $ within the black economy I could see your point…

    • SaiyanEliteVegeta

      Stop promoting your own crap.

    • pls

      k.

  • NoPlaysOff

    Oh, nooooo……….If I had any shred of hope for The Cosby Show to come back on there air one more time, it just went out the window with Mr. Cosby’s mind and a Gordon Cantrell shirt…

  • @Lola:

    “of course it’s an opinion..”

    And there is where the conversation, any meaningful way anyway, ends. There are opinions, and there are facts…and the facts are simply not on your side, I’m afraid.

    As for the rest of your butthurt diatribe, two words:

    Emmit. Till.

    Which went down exactly 60 years ago, in fact.
    The more things change, and all that…

    O.

    • Lola

      bill cosby is likened to emmit till??
      au revoir, francois

      • @Lola:
        Oui, madamoiselle. Both were lynched. One literally, the other metaphorically. Neither had their days in court.

        And of course, both were Black males accused by White women, in the main.

        The similarities are quite striking, in fact.

        And a far sight more factual, than yours.

        O.

        • You’re going on about innocent until proven guilty then likened Bill Cosby to Emmitt Till. You are aware that they men who lynched and massacred Till didn’t spend 1 second in a jail cell? The juror was done in less than a hour. It’s almost like the court system isn’t infallible and being considered innocent doesn’t mean you didn’t actually do anything.

          • Good morning Malik,

            “You’re going on about innocent until proven guilty then likened Bill Cosby to Emmitt Till.”

            That’s correct; in fact, please allow me to expand and revise my previous remarks; I quote:

            “The above words were uttered by then-nominee for the US Supreme Court, one Mr. Clarence Thomas, nearly a quarter of a century ago. It was said in the midst of what some, and this writer is in agreement with the notion, of what could only be rightly described as a wanton witch hunt. Thomas, accused by a former staffer, Ms. (now Prof.) Anita Hill of “sexual harassment”, had his name and reputation sullied in the worst of ways. Though he was eventually confirmed to the nation’s High Court, his life would never be the same.

            Such things are nothing new to African American Men; indeed, the country’s historical record is littered with instances of false or otherwise sensationalized accusations of sexual assault and worse, often lodged by White Women – witness last fall’s Hollaback!’s “anti-street harassment” PSA shown world wide on YouTube, indicting working and lower class Black Men as sexual predators – nearly a century after the premiere of the film “Birth of a Nation“. It’s a very, very old story, sordid and rotten as a whorehouse at lowtide.

            From the Tulsa Race War, to the Rosewood Massacre, to the Scottsboro Boys, to Emmet Till and beyond, Black Men have been constantly the target of vicious and more often than not fallacious allegations of sexual assault, mainly against White Women – and often, with deadly results. Indeed, the historical record shows, with grim clarity, that a majority of the racially motivated lynchings, race riots and massacres that have occurred in the country, came about as a direct result of such baseless allegations.”

            http://www.avoiceformen.com/mens-rights/the-high-tech-lynching-of-william-h-cosby/

            More in a sec…

            O.

            • @Malik:

              Continuing…

              ” You are aware that they men who lynched and massacred Till didn’t spend 1 second in a jail cell?”

              Indeed, I am; are you aware than none of the women who falsely accused scores of Black men, some of whom were/are Black themselves, also didn’t spend 1 day in a jail cell? Are you OK with that? I certainly am not.

              “It’s almost like the court system isn’t infallible and being considered innocent doesn’t mean you didn’t actually do anything.”

              Nor have I argued as much; I am simply arguing for Cosby to have his day in court and until then, to quell the mob mentality. Why are you and other Blacks so hellbent on tarring and feathering the guy, especially in light of the very sordid and ugly history of this countr in this regard toward Black men? I pray you never have to experience what Cosby and so many other Black have, Malik.

              O.

  • “Q: I’m not sure if you’re following the Bill Cosby situation here in the States, but toward the end of last year something like two dozen women, mostly white I would add, came out with allegations that he sexually assaulted them using drugs and drink as his method. Both his real-life wife and tv-show wife from “The Cosby Show” have come out in defense of his reputation, but the ordeal has taken its toll on Cosby; last year he resigned his board position from Temple U here in Philly, and his tour up in Canada has been met with hecklers and protesters. Thus far, no prosecutor has brought any legal charges against Cosby. What do you make of these developments from your unique perspective of someone who observes sociosexual relations between men and women in our time? Some, and this includes Cosby’s wife, Mrs. Camille Cosby, have likened what happened to Cosby, to the recent UVA/Rolling Stone “college campus gangrape” scandal – and this is an extra-judicial attempt to tar and feather a Black man, bypassing the court system in the process. Do you agree or disagree or not, and why?

    R: It’s suspect that Cosby has been accused of crimes many decades after the fact without a scrap of evidence. Why should we take a woman’s word for it when they have falsely accused so many men of rape in the past? Until I see some type of evidence that Cosby did rape these women, or he confesses to the crime, I don’t believe the accusations.

    The harsh treatment Cosby is now getting stems from the fact that our culture believes women are infallible creatures who would never lie for personal gain. Men in the manopshere know better. The two most logical reasons for why these women are now coming forward is either to revive some type of declining career or to get a payout. It’s definitely not to take a rapist off the streets; otherwise they would have gone to the police the night after they were supposedly raped.

    If Cosby really is a rapist then the women who are accusing him now absolutely did not care about leaving a horrible rapist on the loose for decades by not filing a police report. In that case, maybe they hate women more than Cosby does.”

    Bang: The Definitive Interview With RooshV, Part Two

    http://www.avoiceformen.com/sexual-politics/game/bang-the-definitive-interview-with-rooshv-part-two/

    Any questions?

    O.

    • cake211

      Did you really just post some BS from the same guy that theorized that the only way to end rape is to make it legal on private property??? #lolbye

      • @Cake:

        Did you really just attempt Ad Hominem against what Roosh said wrt Cosby based on your ignorance of Roosh’s appropriation of Jonathan Swift in an entirely different discussion?

        Really?

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Modest_Proposal

        I gotta say: we are NOT acquitting the Black race well here, folks. Cmon, surely we can do better!

        O.

        • cake211

          Regardless of whether or not he’s appropriating ideas originated by Jonathan Swift, RooshV believes that the way to end rape is to legalize it on private property. If his observations of “sociosexual relations between men and women in our time” brought him to that conclusion, I don’t trust ANY of his insight, especially in regards to rape.

          Also, great job posting links to your own website with articles that you wrote as a means of providing “evidence” to your points. You write very well, everything you’ve written is like poo covered in glitter, and I really like glitter.

          • @Cake:

            “Regardless of whether or not he’s appropriating ideas originated by Jonathan Swift, RooshV believes that the way to end rape is to legalize it on private property. If his observations of “sociosexual relations between men and women in our time” brought him to that conclusion, I don’t trust ANY of his insight, especially in regards to rape.”

            That you are ignorant of Swift and Roosh’s appropriation of same, or that you don’t the latter personally, not only isn’t a problem I can or should solve, it doesn’t acquit your reasoning skills well. What I quoted of Roosh from an in-depth interview I conducted with him last month is really what’s at issue here, and surprise, once again Black folks who presumably are educated CAN’T respond to that. Hmm.

            “Also, great job posting links to your own website with articles that you wrote as a means of providing “evidence” to your points.”

            Thank you!–it’s a much better job than what you and others have been doing, I must say.

            “You write very well, everything you’ve written is like poo covered in glitter, and I really like glitter.”

            Thank you! I accept.

            :)

            O.

  • miss t-lee
  • Aly

    I refuse to even watch it. Can’t stand to see his face or hear his voice anymore.

    • keepinITreal

      What she said!

    • JanuaryBabe

      Ditto!

    • Epsilonicus

      Agreed

    • Question

      Word. I just want him to go away.

      I will always have a special place in my heart for Dr. Huxtable.

      Bill Cosby? Ehh…whatever.

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