Pop Culture, Race & Politics

I Do This For (Your) Culture?

That's the same thing I did Mr. Benjamin.

I saw the movie Marci X this past weekend. My random movie game is not to be trifled with. Not a bad movie, but not exactly one I’d recommend anybody spend time watching. Of course, if you’re bored and don’t have anything else to do, there are much worse movies you can watch than Marci X like say Who Made The Potato Salad?

Well, in the movie, Lisa Kudrow stars as the billionaire heiress to a music company mogul who is trying to get Damon Wayans (his name is Dr. S in the movie) to apologize for some of his brash lyrics. Well, they end up dating and the plan is for him to go and apologize for his lyrics at the MTV Music awards.

Well, as Damon Wayans date to the awards show, Lisa Kudrow’s character does what any white woman dating a thugged out Black man would do…

…she dresses like an Erykah Badu knockoff.

Say heffa say what???

Oh no she didn’t.

She was fully garbed in a headwrap, a kinte cloth wrap dress, some beads, and I could have sworn I saw an African medallion somewhere. Pure and utter non-sense. And it wasn’t offensive or anything, just overdone. Totally overdone.

It got me to thinking about the asstastic mess of a job people do when they’re trying to emulate another culture in attempts to assimilate or show support. And yes, we do a horrible job, regardless of race. This means Black people too. This isn’t just a white thing…this spans ALL cultures.

For the life of me, I don’t understand how people can really be so oblivious to the fact that in our attempts to show support or “understanding” of another culture, we completely turn ourselves into caricatures. For instance, when white people try to emulate Black culture, have you noticed that they pick the most extreme examples of Black culture to embrace? I’m talking gold or platinum chains that hang down to their ankles, doo-rags when they have straight hair, hiphop gear that nobody even remotely attached to Black culture would wear. Hell, sometimes I think that most companies make “hiphop” clothing specifically for the leagues of white people who want to be cool between the ages of 13-24 and think that “Black” culture is the way to go.

And it isn’t like everything is off. It just seems like people take that one extra step that would normally have you falling off a cliff and getting caught by your toenails on a broken bottle of Absolut Vodka hanging out of the side of a mountain.

Let’s not just stop with white people though. Let’s talk about Black folks. Yes, Black folks who think they are doing a service to Africa by wearing sh*t Africans wouldn’t be caught dead in. Have you ever noticed how ridiculous a lot of Black folks look when they are paying tribute to “mother Africa”?

Me too.

Hell, it offends me sometimes. Throwing on some kinte clothe pants some slippers exposing your flour-powered toes and putting on an “African” hat you purchased from an Arab guy in your local mall doesn’t exhibit support. It exhibits an exhibit of what not to do when trying to show support to your African brothers and sisters, most of whom you’ll never actually meet.

Hmm…I wonder. Has anybody ever thought to ask an African what they would wear at some sort of traditional ceremony in their home country?? It seems as if the biggest problem we have is that none of us ever ASKS a person of the culture we’re attempting to copy what THEY would wear.

And that includes Africans too.

I’m not sure whose worse in this case, white people or Africans. See, it would seem that Africans get their Black fashion ideas from the same place white people do.

Television and other white people.

And I’m just not quite sure which shows either of them are watching.

Hmmm…

Africans that try to dress like Black Americans miss the mark so hard you have to wonder where they were shooting. It’s the same problem white people have, and its the same problem Black Americans have when trying to be more “African.”

Just makes you want to slap everybody.

For some reason, in our attempts to show support we end up mocking the very thing we want to support. How dumb is that? Thats why I don’t wear anything traditionally African now. Hell, I don’t want to walk outside and offend an African. Some years ago I bought a shirt that said “I (Heart) Afrikan People.”

Hmmm…

It was a good idea when I bought it. Then I thought about it, even wore it once, and felt a whole lot of weird because I’m not African. Well, not in the traditional sense. I’m clearly of African descent.

But the fact is, wearing a shirt that says I Love African People isn’t exactly showing love, it feels more like a mockery. I can wear a shirt talking about I love Black people because well…I’m a Black dude. I associate with Black people. (Allegedly) African people view me as Black. Basically, its like a white person wearing a shirt that says I Love Black People. The right sentiments might be there, but truth be told, it almost looks like a slap in the face. That’s some shit you say after you say something ignorant to attempt to cover your tracks.

And I’m ignorant…so I know what you say when trying to cover your tracks.

I keed I keed.

Back to the point here…it’s interesting how in our attempts to show support we often end up mocking other cultures, openly.

What makes it even more f*cked up is this. In the movie, Lisa Kudrow dressed up as a stereotypic “down-to-earth soul” sistah, kind of chick. Damon Wayans…was a gansta rapper. That shit doesn’t match. Which highlights another problem. Not only do folks not know what they’re doing…they don’t even know WHEN to not know what they’re doing!

So the next time you see a white chick in a headwrap with some Ankh earrings or a Black guy wearing a kinte cloth dashiki with a map of the middle passage adorning the front…

…slap the living shit out of them then tell them the good news.

You just saved a bunch of money on your car insurance by switching to Geico.

Seriously though, why do you think that we people, as a rule, generally do such a terrible job of emulating and/or supporting other cultures?

Inquiring minds would like to know?

-VSB P aka THE ARSONIST aka MR. LET’S PLAY NICE TODAY aka GIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIRL HE A 3

PS: VSB recently teamed up with Coliseum Apparel to do a limited run of VSB branded crewneck sweaters. These joints are dope and I’ve already been rocking them about town. It’s still perfect weather for them as well. #teamVSB. Go on over to Coliseum Apparel’s site to check them out and cop you one! They’re going to go fast!!!!

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Damon Young

Panama Jackson is pretty fly for a light guy. He used to ship his frito to Tito in the District, but shipping prices increased so he moved there to save money. When he's not saving humanity with his words or making music with his mouth, you can find him at your mama's mama's house drinking her fine liquors. Most importantly, he believes the children are our future.

  • https://twitter.com/#!/cnote220 Cheech

    The so -called African name thing….That ish kills me. I understand you want to understand another culture but for the love of everything holy, naming your kid dashikl brown just seems culturally confused…

    • http://pervertedalchemist.blogspot.com/ Perverted Alchemist

      Dashiki Brown? I can do you one better- 20 years ago, I went to school with an honor roll student named- no lie- Kente Sullivan (Yes, as in the Kente cloth). I wanted to go in so badly about his name, but I backed off.

  • Mo-VSS

    When I was in 7th grade, I new a white girl named Nicole. She was cool, but she was the white girl who loved all things black. I was always wondering what kind of gel she used to get her hair so slick and shiny to a fault. One day I asked her. Her reply? Grease…Blue Magic to be exact. I was thoroughly confused and just walked away. I wasn’t offended, I just knew her hair texture was definitely not the type grease was made for. Wow…

    I don’t see too many other cultures being…oh wait. As I was typing I thought of Asian culture and then immediately thought of Wu-tang clan and really bad karate flicks. So, yeah…yeah. Lol

    • Loving Me

      I knew a white girl like that, and she kept her hair either braided, or pulled back with the baby hairs slicked down (this was the 90′s) and she was so hood when I first met her I thought she was just so light that she was passable. Til I went to her house and met her mom, dad and granny. Funny thing was, to this day she is still the best braider I know. Heavy handed as hell, but could braid

      • Mo-VSS

        My braider is a Algerian, but he looks white. He’s bomb though!

        • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

          @ MO-VSS
          he is white, until he comes to America, then he becomes black.

          • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

            I bet that happens a lot, AM. People are considered White in their country of origin but when they get here suddenly they aren’t considered White anymore.

            • GypsyCurl

              I disagree. If someone looks white in their country, i dont see how coming to America makes people consider them black. If it is someone that can pass for white but considers themselves black because of their lineage, then sure, they may call themselves black. But as far as what someone else would consider them?
              Im not talking about the supposed characterization of people as either Caucasoid, Africanoid, or Asianoid (whatever those dumb terms are for the only “3″ kind of races in the world…there is only the human race). Im thinking of only skin color.

              • Justmetheguy

                +1 re: Gypsycurl’s post. We characterize ppl by what they look like here, not by what they want to be considered

                • http://wildcougarconfessions.com Wild Cougar

                  THIS. Most immigrants have a hard time accepting this simple fact. It doesn’t matter that you are the nephew of the secretary of the ministry of armed forces in Mali and your family owns most of the capital city and you’re just here cause the oppressed majority clan overthrew your friends and there’s a price on your head. The minute you got off that plane, you were black. Just black. Just like me. Nobody cares about your pedigree.

                  • Breezy

                    Actually where I presently reside I have notice a drastic difference in the way I am treated once I speak (Queen’s English) to people. I was even told by a native of this lovely area that 2520′s here tend to treat Afro-Americans (blacks) different then they treat Caribbean (blacks). At first I didn’t get it but I have actually personal witnessed it in my interaction with 2520′s.

                    • http://wildcougarconfessions.com Wild Cougar

                      By Queen’s English, you mean something an educated Africa American doesn’t speak, or do you mean an accent. And treated differently, how? You’re saying white people can tell the difference from sight? Cause that would be a good trick.

                      Racism in this country is about treatment based on skin.color. if you’re saying youre not profiled cause youre from an island, Id like to know where they do that at. I’ve met a lot of deluded immigrants and I’ve learned that you will only remove their delusion from their cold dead hands.

                    • Rattlerpride

                      Maybe I’m alone in my ignorance, but what the heck is a 2520?

                  • Breezy

                    WC…am pretty sure you misunderstood what I said. Queen’s English refers to the way that I speak and the accent…that was not a stab at anyone’s education or lack thereof. The African American’s in the area I presently lived informed me of their observation of how 2520s treat and interact with Caribbean black is completely different from the way the treat and interact with African-American blacks and since I have lived here I have notice that it is true. I am not saying they treat me with MORE respect or I am more favored all I am saying the way they interact with me is different. Sorry if you were offended, I was just stating what I have personally experienced.

                    • http://wildcougarconfessions.com Wild Cougar

                      I’m not offended. I believe people will treat you differently once knowing you were not born here. I treat immigrants differently, because they understand the world differently. I’m sure once people hear how I speak, they change their opinion of me. But none not that matters when people make judgements based on your skin color. Queens English won’t save you from being followed in a store or getting your head beat by a cop.

                • Mo-VSS

                  Yeah, he’s looks white and most folks think he’s white until he starts talking and they they wonder where he’s from.

              • Yoles

                in some countries the “one drop rule” works in reverse and it is not all about how you look, you have some white in you and you say you are white then, you are white

                once those people get to america shyt changes hard and fast and it is a shock to them…

              • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

                @ GypsyCurl,

                I was talking about how some Northern Africans view themselves. It’s a reality that I am NOT going to argue about. When they are back in the motherland, they do not acknowledge the rest of us, after all they are part of the white Arab black, and then when they come to the states, they start to align with us, talking about “Oh my, you are from Africa MY sister” Fug outta hurr with that nonsense. In essence, they view themselves as being black. I do not for a minute entertain shade thrown about the motherland, by someone who grew up there!

                • Justmetheguy

                  @ African Mami- I didn’t know Northern Africans did that. I thought they just claimed their religion or ethnic group and shunned the notion that they were African. Interesting…

                  • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

                    Let me be very clear SOME, NOT all before somebody starts trippin on some crimson wave moods!

                    • MJoy

                      at least he replies to you… :(

                • Djuobah

                  I think this really this really depends on religion as well. I am West African and Muslim, and I noticed that I always get good treatment from North Africans, especially from Morocco, Egypt and Yemen, and when they say “sister”, they usually refer to it, as in sister w/in Islam. Knowing a lil Arabic helps as well.

                  The only time I will say I received racist treatment was from South Asians, regardless or religion.

    • LMNOP

      I think there are some kids who don’t really get adequate instruction on personal hygiene at home, and by the time they are in 7th grade that is obviously a problem, and they will probably be feeling some social pressure to groom themselves, but they have no idea how to do it and just guess or base what they put in their hair off of what they’ve seen other people do.

      Fortunately now that there is the internet, these kids will hopefully be able to google things like “my teeth are fuzzy and turning a funky color, what should I do?” or “I’m a white girl, what hair products should I use?”

      • Todd

        Ironically, I googled “I’m a White girl, what hair products should I use?” and got nothing but Black hair care products. One of the results was a Yahoo Answers page where a White woman with kinky hair asked if she should use Black hair products. So, ol’ White girl trying to find herself would be straight LOST.

        • MJoy

          I think this is because “white girl” and “hair care products” are never in the same sentence… We all use hair care products but the phrase is reserved for us.

          • MJoy

            … and gay men

        • nillalatte

          lmao… I’m usually the one googling most of these weird questions after reading them on here. I’m glad to see you do too Todd. lol

        • LMNOP

          lol, I guess she would still be lost.

    • GypsyCurl

      My pet peeve: white poeople with locks. The locks are never styled neatly. The person just looks like they decided to stop combing their hair one day. How disrespectful to think that locks means not combing your hair. Growing and maintaining and having well groomed locks takes work.

      • Breezy

        I have seen numerous 2520′s with lovelyful locks so I can’t get with you on this one. In fact I think there was a chick on American Idol recently who had locks and they were gorgeous.

        • GypsyCurl

          Yeah we will have to disagree bc Ive never seen nice ones.

        • MrsBagnet

          I saw a white girl with beautiful locs on a cooking show once. The style really suited her because she had really thick, really curly hair. Her loose hair would have been a ‘fro.

      • Geneva Girl

        That KILLS me. Black women are spending millions getting blond weaves and blondie is sporting tricked-up locks. Ironic.

        • Breezy

          And it looked (in my opinion) absolutely beautiful!!!

        • GypsyCurl

          I dont discriminate. I dont like weaves either.

      • Kema

        “How disrespectful to think that locks means not combing your hair. ”

        Actually some feel that this is the only natural way to lock. It is called the neglect method. The problem occurs when someone doesnt realize they still have to wash their hair.

        • http://www.twitter.com/Think2Inpire Think2Inspire

          +1 When I had locs I simply stopped combing my hair. So while I washed and oiled my scalp there was no purpose for a comb. Most loc heads no matter color are some of the neatest people about their hair. Even people who neglect believe in cleanliness just little to no mainipulation. That being said I rebuke anyone who thinks locing hair means not washing in the name shampoo.

          • Kema

            I have sisterlocks… I got them so I could wash frequently since I run.

            • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

              @ Kema,

              Let me see motorcyclist-CHECK
              Sista Locks-CHECK

              You are one hell of a SEGZY chick!!! LOOOOOOOOOOOOVE IT ALL!

              • Kema

                Awwww! Thank you Mami!!!

      • http://pervertedalchemist.blogspot.com/ Perverted Alchemist

        For some reason, Korn and Counting Crows immediately come to mind when I read your post.

      • Royale W. Cheese

        Ask a real Rastafarian and he/she’ll tell you that *groomed* locks are actually disrespectful. They are supposed to grow by not grooming the hair. Some call groomed locks “buppie dreads.”

        This is yet another case of Afro-Americans bastardizing another culture, and quite interestingly being territorial the unauthentic version.

        • MJoy

          WORD.

          All of my uncles with their “authentic Jamaican dreads” look crazy and disheveled as hell.

        • SweetSass

          Rastafarians didn’t invent dreadlocks. That style has been worn by various African tribes for eons. And sone are in fact intentional and very neat like how American Blacks tend to wear their locs.

          • Djuobah

            +1! Thank you!

      • sincereluv4life

        you haven’t met this fine white guy who I work with, his locks are really thin & he gets them maintained weekly w/ the edge up & he has blonde hair, they actually look nice—- who knew?

  • LiveFromDa215

    You make some good points.I was just discussing White people who have dreads with a friend of mine last night. They confuse me.

    • MissAbdul

      Why?

    • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

      +1

    • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

      talk about confusion. Was on the bus today, when I saw this white dude with dreads, and about PUKED! It is no secret on hurr, that I appreciate dudes with dreads! This one had tree stumps growing out his damn head! Then to make matters worse, he had used green, black and gold thread to wrap each individual stump on his head,so as to resemble the Jamaican flag. I just stared in mindless wonder at the atrocity that was before me! If you are going to rock dreads, be respectful of them and the beauty they project. Not unless you are a Flavor Flave clone.

      • http://www.twitter.com/Think2Inspire Think2Inspire

        Sh*t like this make me feel awful for Jamaicans. Smdh… They have one of the most misrepresented cultures out there. Dude shoulda just wrapped his loc in red, white, and blue

        • Meisarebel

          Dredlocks are not inherently Jamaican. In fact, most people you see with “dredlocks” most likely do not have “natural locks” which is the matted look that most people hate or find disgusting.

          Jah.

          • Kema

            Dreadlocks are also worn by Indian holy men and are considered sacred.

            Also, Samson (bible) had 7 locks.

            • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

              I’m going to go read the Bible and make Samson be my bible boo!!! Angel Michael is my Bible booo!!! I could swear I picture him with locks sweeping the heavenly floors and being so damn schmegzy!!! Forgive me Lord, for I know what I say but can’t help it.

              • MJoy

                oh no you didn’t! lol.

              • sincereluv4life

                LOL! This was my sacrilegious laugh for the day!

          • http://www.twitter.com/Think2Inpire Think2Inspire

            @Meisarebel I know. My comment was directed at the wrapping if locs in Jamaican flag colors. It grinds my gears when people think Jamica IS the caribbean and the president is Bob Marley. I♥ JA but there is more to the West Indies.

            • Kema

              Wait… Jamaica isnt the West Indies? Man, next you will try to tell me that NY isn’t the US.

              • CNotes

                I think T2I means that when others think of the West Indies, they ONLY think of the island of Jamaica (not Antigua, Grenada, Barbados, St. Vincent, etc.).

                • Kema

                  I understood! I was joking because some people feel the same way about NY and the US.

                  • CNotes

                    Gotcha. So True! : )

            • Meisarebel

              I get that. I had a friend who LITERALLY thought Jamaica was the entire Caribbean. Like drew a map type ish. She was from California. She learned that night…

      • Todd

        That reminds me of some mess I saw at the West Indian Day Parade here in NYC. I got on the train on the way back and saw this White couple rocking Jamaican flags as bandanas on their head. On top of that, when they asked me for directions back to their hotel, it was clear they were FRENCH. WTF? You don’t see me rocking a German flag bandana at Oktoberfest. So why are they messing with someone else’s culture like that. At least they didn’t desecrate the Bajan flag. :)

        • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

          interestingly enough, I know a gang of American ninjas who pick countries to represent during the West Indian Parade as to not feel left out.

          I know one chick who just randomly picks a flag as she walks thru Brooklyn on the way to the parade and goes hard reppin’ all day. I have an issue with that too.

          • Todd

            Sigh…my mom, for ALL of her issues, never did anything like that when she came with us as kids. She was American, and she wasn’t going to hide it. Stars and Stripes Forever and all that jazz.

            • MJoy

              Good for her. People never want to rep the US… for the obvious reasons I guess.

      • DQ

        There are some white Jamaicans though…

        …just saying.

        • Meisarebel

          Exactly. And Asian, Indian, Creole, Spanish… The Caribbean is VERY diverse.

        • Todd

          Hey, our very own Yoles has a White Jamaican father. Speaking of her, where is she? :)

          • Yoles

            here i am and Big Up to all my jamaican massive (whether they be black, indian, chinese, white or a mix)…
            ♫♬ Greetingggssss I bring from Jah, to allllllll ragamuffin oh wee ♫♬

            • Breezy

              **airhorns, sirens and gun shots** pow pow pow

              • DQ

                ^^^^This made me laugh out loud at my desk. They know I’m not doing work now.

                • Breezy

                  Busted!!!! LMBO!

            • Meisarebel

              Why did I literally SING that song before I even finished reading the whole sentence?

          • MJoy

            Big Up!

            And can I say there’s nothing sexier than a white Jamaican!

    • The Other Jerome

      It’s not to confusing to me. It’s just a hair style. It’s your hair, have fun with it.

    • http://twitter.com/itztrizz617 Tristan

      To be honest even tho white dreads look like somthing you pull out a clogged drain…you gotta let em live on that especially with black chicks rocking perms and blonde wigs like they was born with that straight hair steez.

      • GypsyCurl

        It is ironic how black women dont see themselves as trying to emulate another culture by straightening their hair. Ive heard so many excuses as to why a black woman relaxes her hair and gets a weave. Never once have I heard a black woman admit that she straightens her hair because it conforms to the white standard of beauty. The closest comment that ive heard is that she feels more beautiful with straight hair

        • Mena

          Maybe straighter hair does make her look prettier. It’s like getting a haircut. Some cuts will look wonderful on one person and the other person, not so much. The natural hair mafia needs to calm down. I don’t look at my relaxed hair and think that i am conforming. I look at my relaxed hair and say, “I would probably look nice natural (i used to rock braids and would take them out after 2 months and would have a giant fro) but don’t want to go through the hassle of going natural.” To each his own.

          • GypsyCurl

            But all you and me and other black women have been feed is straight hair. I dont think any black woman can say that they consciously made the decision to have straight hair without deeply thinking about the psychological mark of the white standard if beauty, which has in turn, become peer pressure from other black woman to have straight hair.

            • Mena

              “I dont think any black woman can say that they consciously made the decision to have straight hair” It was the style to wear straight hair (and yes, i understand the reasons to why it was done in the past) just like the style now is to go natural and the style in the 60s and 70s was to rock a fro and the style in the 70s and 80s was to rock the jheri curl.

            • Amazonian Midget

              Speaking as a curly girl, the natural hair mafia does need to have several seats. I had relaxed hair from 6-22 and it wasn’t because my mother decided to conform to some standard of beauty (she herself rocked the biggest Angela Davis fro back in the day) it was simply because i was EXTREMELY “tender headed”. As some of you know, a tender head, and long thick hair does not an easy or painless detangling process make. When I did decide to go natural, it wasn’t because i was trying to get back to my roots, I just wanted something different. It’s hair guys. Hair should be treated as an accessory, its not that deep.
              Btw, when i first went natural and visited a natural hair salon, my hair texture was mocked by the stylist. She said, “Most would look at your hair texture and say it’s good, but because it’s too soft to hold twists and your curls aren’t really tight, I call it bad.” All I did was ask for some tips to help care for my curls. Needless to say, she didn’t get my money.
              I said all that to say, whether your hair is straight, curly, short, long, locked, etc…it is JUST HAIR.

              • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

                “Hair should be treated as an accessory, its not that deep.”

                Agreed.

              • Yoles

                amen… its hair, dead protein and some act like its the arc of the covenant or some other really significant thing.. it grows, it falls out and it grows some more, do what you want with it… i straighten my hair because i love showing length and my natural hair aint trying to hear that.. braids, twists et al doesn’t show how long i’ve grown it but a blow out from las dominicanas does… its MY hair back up off me!!!

                • kickandasnare

                  … blowout from las dominicanas? awsome!

                  Hey yoles : )

                • http://asiyah3.wordpress.com Asiyah

                  LOL and that is precisely what I love about being Dominican. we have so many different types of hair in that country that we have to learn how to manage each and every type. Makes me proud I’m from there LOOOL

        • BlueCrush

          Great comment. I feel the same. The reason why the majority of the world is on the striaght hair, small lips, straight nose,white skin, double eyelid,etc (from blacks to asians) badwagon is because of the Euro-ethnocentrism.

          I see it for what it is and I don’t buy it. I don’t justify anyone that alters their natural self for the sake of it. If you want to go straight go straight. But stop making lousy excuses for why you chose to opt out of being your natural self and favoring the one’s in power.

          Just imagine a world dominated and ruled by blacks. Dreads would be the norm and Dark skin desirable. I get it. Standards of beauty are dictated by the ruling class. But for me, I cannot justisfy to myself straightening my hair ALL the time and wearing weaves ALL the time. I can understand once in while. But ALL them time? Never wearing my own hair…that is questionable.

          I think African women in their natural state is beautiful, same thing goes for white/european women. You just have to take care of your body and skin.

          Why do they only enjoy the luxury of looking like themselves? (yes I know they have weaves but usually to make their hair more full rather than getting afros)Why must black women straighten their hair to be sexy? Same thing goes for Asians with the double eyelid & nose surgeries and died hair.

          I can’t see myself living that way for the rest of my life, spending money all the time to keep up with the eurocentric Jones. When I look in the mirro, this hair, my skin, and my features are beautiful. I don’t need the whole world to tell me that…and somehow I know they think the same.

          To each his own…but keep it real.

      • http://wildcougarconfessions.com Wild Cougar

        Oh Lord, here we go.

        • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

          LOL, you know.

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

        true-izm.

      • Breezy

        LOL @ “even tho white dreads look like somthing you pull out a clogged drain”

    • GypsyCurl

      Ah, i should have scrolled down a little further before I made the same comment.

    • Kema

      “You make some good points.I was just discussing Black people who have straight hair with a friend of mine last night. They confuse me.”

      Hear how this sounds? How can black women straighten their hair and then look confused when a white person has locks. smh

      • Justmetheguy

        ” Hear how this sounds? How can black women straighten their hair and then look confused when a white person has locks. smh”

        haha, yeah I hear it. Hypocrisy is funny in all forms. I get the hygiene/messiness angle too tho #shruglife

      • Royale W. Cheese

        Well played. I know this was a remix of a previous comment, but your version sounds like something I’ve genuinely wondered myself, especially given my 10+ years experience with that horrible product and the horrendous service that usually comes with it.

    • http://www.styleillusions.com WIP

      I have no problem with white people wearing locs (or anybody for that matter) but rarely…actually never have I seen a them nice groomed on a white person. I assume it’s because the hair is so straight it doesn’t loc well but usually the locs are very messy and the person under the locs is messy. When I see white people with locs it usually just appears that they gave up n grooming themselves overall and their sh*t rolled up into locs on its own.

      • Mena

        Exactly. I never liked locks until I finally saw them on a black person that kept them groomed. Those dookie dreads with droplets hanging are not what’s up. Now, if they are clean and tight AND you’re thick…i can totally work with you. ALL DAY.

    • nillalatte

      Reading this whole thread all I could picture was 2 white people whose hair has completely grossed me out. One was a homeless woman that frequented a restaurant I managed back in the day. I think her hair would qualify as one huge mat of a dread. I was scared she had spiders growing in that cacti looking head of hers. *shivers*

      Another was a ‘white’ dude who worked at a restaurant who was rockin dreads. I kind of just stared at him trying to determine if he might have been mixed or just mixed up. *shrugs* Out of sight, usually out of mind.

  • http://panamaenrique.wordpress.com Malik

    Black people (and those of the Diaspora) have been appropriating cultures from the continent of Africa sense Marcus Garvey’s terrible misguided “Back to Africa” project. I think people do a terrible job of paying homage because they believe that JUST showing you like someone else’s culture should flatter them regardless of the accuracy or results. Like white people and anything related to Native Americans. It’s complete arrogance. Granted Americans don’t really grow up thinking they have a “culture” in the same sense that every one else in the world does.

    • http://www.twitter.com/Think2Inspire Think2Inspire

      “I think people do a terrible job of paying homage because they believe that JUST showing you like someone else’s culture should flatter them regardless of the accuracy or results.”

      People need to utilize an encyclopaedia or something because I’ve yet to see ACCURACY in what many try to emulate. You love your Black friends, cool. But don’t try to tell them about how you made collard greens and macaroni for dinner or your love of ankhs when they are from the Caribbean. Don’t tell a Trini you love their Jamaican accent. And f̶r̶o̶m̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶s̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶e̶x̶p̶e̶r̶i̶e̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶I̶ ̶l̶e̶a̶r̶n̶e̶d̶ never tell Ghanaians you like the Nigerian soccer team is better.

      • http://www.twitter.com/Think2Inspire Think2Inspire

        *omit is from that last sentence :)

      • Meisarebel

        “Don’t tell a Trini you love their Jamaican accent.”

        Truer words have never been spoken. From personal experience.

        • MJoy

          My dad has shot many a American for this exact mistake.

    • Todd

      Southerners (regardless of skin color) have a clear definition of culture by any reasonable standard of the word, and they’re as American as apple pie. That said, you’re largely right, and it’s a huge reason why “authenticity” is such a big deal among hipsters and other non-ethnic Whites in America. If you don’t know who you are, you have to constantly prove yourself.

      • CNotes

        “Southerners (regardless of skin color) have a clear definition of culture by any reasonable standard of the word, and they’re as American as apple pie.”

        This is correct, Sir! : )

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

        yes, us southerners f*cking rock. lol.

        • Justmetheguy

          I’m Justmetheguy and I approve of this statement! Whatchu ninjas know about the Dirty South

        • http://pervertedalchemist.blogspot.com/ Perverted Alchemist

          Southeast in this piece!!!!

      • nillalatte

        Southern pride all the way… except for the backwoods rednecks who go fishing for cat fish with their fingers, alligator hunters, and hillbillies that shoot first. There are probably a few more, but I’ll stick with that for now. :D

        • Justmetheguy

          You know what though? I actually like those Southerners too lol, they tend to be overtly racist for no apparent reason, but apart from that they’re pretty entertaining and have a lot of spunk. Ever seen the show “Swamp People”? lol

          Nilla, I thought you were from like Detroit or somethin? What u mean Southern pride? lol

          • nillalatte

            Are you serious?! Hells no. I’m born and raised in TN bruh. (looks around the room) Somebody betta tell ‘em about me. Corey where you at? Yo’ boy needs some lessons. Shyyyyyttttt… lmao

            Swamp people creep me out. My sister likes that new show Duck Dynasty (I think is the name) and told me, “if you’re a real redneck you’ll watch that show.” I ain’t watched one damn show. Some of these shows just make me cringe. I think, Hollywood, will you please stop putting these morons on television for the rest of the world to see! smdh

      • Rattlerpride

        I reps Flaw-duh.

    • MJoy

      “Granted Americans don’t really grow up thinking they have a “culture” in the same sense that every one else in the world does.”

      I think this is a huge part of it. Americans aren’t known for their deeply rooted culture (except for the South) and they long for something to cling on to. We have a culture of commerce with an ‘every man for himself’ attitude which is ultimately not fulfilling leaving us ‘lost ones’ desperate for something to cling on to. People try to emulate other cultures not just to show support but to feel like they belong to something traditional and important… and just end up looking silly.

  • http://Www.thinkprettysmart.com Ms. Smart

    A chick dating Black men who does the whole ‘Mother Africa’ thing probably doesn’t pay attention to many Black people on a day-to-day basis. Black people may not exist to her except in the context of her life. Does that make sense? She remembers what the Black people looked like who made her laugh or stood out. But she didn’t pay attention to the Black people she sees at the Whole Foods or Banana Republic.

    I think this is just the case across the board. Extremes get normalized to the point that we allow then to shape reality–if we aren’t careful. For example, loud Black women don’t represent all or most Black women. But since they are so loud, they are the ones who are noticed and addressed most often.

    • That Ugly Kid

      See, my thing is, if you rock a style because you genuinely like it, go fot it. If I saw a white girl rockin’ African attire, I wouldn’t get offended. I’ll admit that I’d double-take because it’s a rare sight, but I wouldn’t be offended in the least. If she likes the style, she’s fine.

      • MJoy

        +1

        I know a lot of white people who rock all kinds of ish because that’s their style, what they’re into. And they get judged like nobody’s business but they’re actually being their authentic selves.

        Do you boo boo.

      • http://www.thinkprettysmart.com Ms. Smart

        But they may see and genuinely like the outlandish stuff.

    • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

      sounds like it just came out of a dissertation on Ever-changing Societal Norms and Pragmatism

      • http://www.thinkprettysmart.com Ms. Smart

        Naw. It came out of a “Whoa. This Tylenol PM kicked in really fast” moment.

  • That Ugly Kid

    I said this same thing about white people who wore “We Are Trayvon” shirts. Sorry, it doesn’t sit well with me. A middle-class white person was born into privelage, and therefore couldn’t possibly truly understand what’s like to be a black person in this country. This is no fault of their own, as we can’t choose who our parents are. I understand your intent, but you’re execution is wrong. You are not Trayvon and you never will be. Be happy about this.

    Now, black people dressing up in African attire only bother me when they try to make me feel like sh*t because I have no will to visit Africa. The same continent that, during European occupation and slavery, sold their own people to make profit/save themselves? Yea, excuse me if I’m not overjoyed to go back to a continent that possibly sold my ancestors into slavery. If I ever travel outside the country, the FIRST place I’m going to is Brazil. Followed by Japan. Africa though? Probably not. Besides lions, Africa has nothing that interests me. Oh well.

    • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

      @TUK,

      Really tho@ur African comments! URRRRRRRGH!

      • That Ugly Kid

        Hey what can I say? Aside from lions, women, and the country Egypt, there’s nothing that interests me about Africa. It’s not a hate thing, I’m just not up to going. In fact, I believe that most black people that do go to Africa only do so because some one guilted them to do it. “Ugh, how could you not want to go back to the MOTHERLAND?” or “You need to get in touch with your “roots.” or “How can you call yourself black if you don’t have undying, unquestioned love for Africa?”

        Yea, you see where I’m going with that. That’s the problem I have with black people in general, they’re always trying to guilt you into some sh*t via race. F*ck if I’m genuinely disinterested. Red Tails? Go see it. Why? Because you’re black and you HAVE to support black cinema. If you don’t, then who will see it?

        I get tired of having my blackness questioned.

        • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

          I found your comments rather offensful!(i know its not a word) But, hey. I’m used to it.

          • That Ugly Kid

            Sorry, it wasn’t my intent to insult a Nubian Goddess.

            • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

              uh oh! me likey :) I’m easily flattered by those who always speak of their woola woola’s and abilities!!!! *wink wink*

              • MJoy

                woola woola sounds more like a vajayjay word to me

          • http://wildcougarconfessions.com Wild Cougar

            He’s young, and full of vinegar. Don’t mind him. *pats TUK on the head*

            • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

              I figured, that’s why I didn’t go in!

            • That Ugly Kid

              And I love you too, Cougs!!!

        • http://asiyah3.wordpress.com Asiyah

          Egypt is the only country in Africa I’m not that interested in seeing. Eh. Give me Tunisia, Senegal, South Africa, and Nigeria :)

          • http://afrikanmami.blogpsot.com African Mami

            Giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirl,

            Senegalese men are BOMB!!!! The food too. The culture. Just everythang!

            • http://asiyah3.wordpress.com Asiyah

              mmmhmmmm African Mami. you know it!

        • http://www.thinkprettysmart.com Ms. Smart

          I feel you! I gleefully went (with people I knew and stayed behind TWO gates with guards), but I didn’t go out of guilt. However, I did NOT feel the ‘connection’ or even sadness that other people report when they step onto the continent. When I reported some of the stuff I saw (and experienced) with regard to corruption (arbitrary car searches and the such), my mother was pissed that I went because she didn’t think it was safe.

          • http://afrikanmami.blogpsot.com African Mami

            where did you go?

        • Sandy

          typical African American who doesn’t know anything about Africa. Let me tell you something, AFRICA IS NOT A GIANT JUNGLE, YOU DON4T SEE ANIMALS EVERYWHERE, OKAY !!!!!!

    • That Ugly Kid

      Oh and to add, I have no problem with white people dressing “urban” as long as that’s truly what they feel comfortable wearing. If you enjoy wearing Rocawear and the like because you truly dig that style, and not because you’re trying to impress your black friends, then have at it. Same goes for language. I don’t cringe at all when an urban-esque white person uses “black slang”. Even the word “n*gga”. As long as it doesn’t sound forced, like you’re TRYING to emulate black people (and thus, ends up coming off as you mocking us), I’m fine with it.

      I know this one white kid who dresses urban and uses the same vernacular because he’s grown up around black people his entire life so it’s the only style he’s comfortable with. He even says the word “n*gga” when conversating with us and uses it as flawless as a black person would. However, he knows that he can only pull this off around us, his friends, because we don’t care. Strangers are likely to not co-sign him using of the word.

      • Royale W. Cheese

        I met a white guy like this when I was in high school. That dude was effortlessly hood. I talked to him before a double date (that I agreed to as a favor to my friend…dating hood dudes was not on my bucket list). He actually attempted to “talk proper” around me. He even alienated my intelligence just like a black guy from the hood. He had the entire thing down pat. It was kind of surreal.

        If he told me that I “acted white” that would have totally floored me.

        • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

          I think every Black neighborhood has that one White guy that grew up there and seems authentic. He’s always referred to as “a cool White dude”. I think Kid Rock was a perfect example of ‘cool White dude’ syndrome when he was growing up in Detroit.

          • http://www.twitter.com/Think2Inspire Think2Inspire

            And this is where I introduce you to Tyrone. The most hood white boy I’ve ever met. He was genuinely hood from mixing sugar water and hating the police to his love of pickled eggs. He even owned pit-bulls fro “protection.” I love hood people.

          • Iceprincess

            Na, kid rock is still pretty white with the country music & sh*t sometimes. Em is the real white /black dude of detroit.

            • http://commentarybyvalentina.wordpress.com/ Val

              That’s now, but I saw a documentary about Kid Rock when he was young and he was definitely a “Black White dude” back in the day.

          • Geneva Girl

            Where I come from we just called them w*ggers.

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

        i dont have a problem with white people rocking urban gear. i have a problem with extremes. and a white dude who grew up around mostly black folks (as is my sister’s baby daddy..lol) then i get it. they also are extremely comfortable and aren’t forcing anything.

        but if that ninja uses the nword, we’re gonna have a prollem.

      • http://afrikanmami.blogpsot.com African Mami

        @ TUK,

        For the life of me, I could not understand your lax attitude towards a white person using the n-word. That word is painful! Very. Filled with vitriol. Makes my head spin. It should never ever be used by anybody, especially any white folk! Yo! I get Aubrey over that word.

        • Teezy

          The other day I heard an Indian guy (40ish) answer his cell saying “Wat’s up my ninja.”
          Allegedly he was on the phone with a good friend of his “black” (least that’s what he told me) …..not that I asked but he must have seen the horrified look on my face & that ninja quickly got ta explainin’

    • The Other Jerome

      Dang a white person can’t wear an “I Am Travon shirt? Sorry man. As corrupt as this society can be, if peeps want to show solidarity for a just cause, i’m all for it.

      • Geneva Girl

        +1

        • Justmetheguy

          +2 That was the least offensive of the things he listed. I love it when white people seem to legitimately care. Those individuals are gonna take a lot of flack from a lot of their own people for that. I respect it, and I’m team solidarity regardless. I also disagree that most afro-americans that go to Africa do so out of guilt. Sounds like he pulled that one out his @ss. There are a LOT of ppl that are actually legitimately interested in Africa with the means to actually go. So I’m requesting more people from u TUK. No shots fired tho

          • Kema

            @ TUK

            BUP BUP BUP

          • That Ugly Kid

            Again, someone can legitimately care about something, but execute it wrongly. I’m not saying white people can’t support our cause, I’m just saying they do it better. Learn the difference. That’s like me trying to protest the Birmingham church bombings by showing up to churches wearing a bomb costume. I mean well, but I just executed that sh*t poorly. But I should be excused for my poor, offensive execution in the name of “solidarity”? No.

            And maybe not most, but A LOT of black people are guilted into visiting Africa. They go to Africa not because they appreciate the culture of whatever country they’re visiting, not because of scenary, but because they feel like they HAVE to be closer to their roots. I’ve seen black people in person and on the internet straight up admit that they feel guilty because they haven’t been to Africa yet. Because they feel like as a black person, it’s something they HAVE to do.

            • Justmetheguy

              ” I’ve seen black people in person and on the internet straight up admit that they feel guilty because they haven’t been to Africa yet. Because they feel like as a black person, it’s something they HAVE to do.”

              Sound like a buncha lames to me shawty. (shrugs) If you say they exist I’ll take your word…

              As far as the white people needing to do better. I agree, but it at least gets the conversation going, that way you can start a convo and ask them what else they’re doing to help and give them suggestions of what would actually be helpful. If not for the shirt though, you probably wouldn’t have started talking to them about combatting racial injustice. I know I wouldn’t, because I would assume they’re as apathetic to it as most white people in this country are. It’s a step in the right direction, so I don’t talk negative about it. That was my counter point to yours. Not that I disagree, I’d just extend your perspective to include what seemed like blind spots. I just encourage them to take it a step further than a shirt. Then another step….you get the idea. If they don’t participate at all, then I’m a lot less likely to even take the conversation there with them (or talk to them at all truth be told)

              • MJoy

                so… can we get married now?

                • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

                  awwww, femmmmboooooo!!!! I heart you.

              • That Ugly Kid

                There are other ways to get people talking though. Just like how people complained about a video on Youtube where a white dude used blackface to interview a bunch of college kids about Black History Month. People were offended because of what blackface symbolizes. Yea, they were aware of his noble intentions, but they felt he could have handled the situation differently. Just like my bomb costume in the Birmingham church scenario, does it get people talking? Yep. However was it a poor way of doing it? Yep.

                And it wasn’t like there weren’t examples of better ways to support the cause either. What with a massive abundance, of hoodie marches, hoodie pictures, pictures of Ice tea and skittles with the caption “These are NOT weapons” on it, etc. They just need to think a little bit longer before jumping head first into something. Or need I remind you of KONY2012?

                • Justmetheguy

                  No, I definitely see your point, and agree for the most part. I just wouldn’t beat them up for taking a slightly different approach than just wearing a hoodie. But touche with the Kony 2012 fiasco though…even though ppl made the same argument I’m making about this one…smh, everything’s so subjective

                  • That Ugly Kid

                    Oh yea, I understand. I’m not beating them up about it. Because trust me I do sincerely appreciate the support, especially at the risk of being ridiculed. It’s just that some things could use a tad bit more thought. That’s all.

              • Sandy

                you are absolutely right on everything

      • That Ugly Kid

        Wrong. There’s solidarity, then there’s pretending you can relate to a race in a way you possibly couldn’t. You don’t need to wear “We Are Trayvon” shirts to show solidarity. There are a MYRIAD of other things you can do for solidarity, like say, marching? Protesting? Wearing hoodies? And those are just the top of my head.

      • http://verysmartbrothas.com Panama Jackson

        yeah. i am too. sometimes the cause is great enough. who cares. we need the support from those whitefolks rocking those shirts to get anything moving.

        • Justmetheguy

          @ Panama- Exactly. That’s what I was tryna say. You don’t have to get it right from the jump, but just making an attempt puts you above the crowd. Most white people think that ish has NOTHING to do with them, and they don’t particularly even care about the case. It makes them feel uncomfortable at best and guilty at worst. So for those shirt and hoodie wearers, they’re embracing the uncomfortable feeling in the name of justice and solidarity. It’s not effective on paper, but it speaks to the “do you even give an 1/8th of a d*mn?” question. It lets us know who we can at least try to educate because many if not most ppl aren’t even worth your time or conversation

    • http://www.tessism.com Tessism

      Just a sidenote, you know that Africa is a continent so huge that it could a few United States in it, right? You do know, as wwell, that not every African or African country supported the transatlantic slave trade? Yes? I’m not saying be guilted to visiting any of her beautiful nations (the one I was born in is quite breathtaking as are IMHO all of them in some way) but I am saying, if you don’t mind, examine, unpack, deconstruct what you just spewed about a continent of millions. I say this because, while you have no interest, it is clear you also have no perspective on thhe vast array of countries on the continent & their gifts & downfalls. It screams oversimplified & dismissive to me & of course is your right. It also makes sense to have that approach since it bolsters your opinion & worldview. I just suggest you reconsider & learn more before you make sweeping statements about a place you barely know anything. Imjustsaying.

      • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

        @ Tessism,

        Thank you my sista! Thank you!!!!!!!!!

      • That Ugly Kid

        And I’m aware of every single thing you “pointed out”. I know that Africa in its entirety didn’t partcipate in the slave trade. Hence why, in my initial comment, I state that my ancestors were POSSIBLY sold into slavery. However, as stated, that was not my sole reason for avoiding most of the continent. I’m a guy who loves researching different cultures in his free time. Especially Africa because the continent is so vast with so many different cultures.

        What I’m saying to you, and everyone else who gets offended (not saying you were) is that while I’m FULLY aware of the diversity Africa has to offer. I’m. Not. Interested. Point blank. Period. As I said, the only countries that intrigues me enough that I actually would gladly go visit, is Egypt and others for the wildlife.. I’m “dismissive” of most of Africa not because of hatred, bitterness, or ignorance, but because of genuine disinterest. I just don’t find most of it’s countries intriguing enough to go visit.

        • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

          I implore you to research on Zanzibar, right NOW! and then come tell me Egypt is the only place in the motherland you would ever think of going!

          • That Ugly Kid

            “As I said, the only countries that intrigues me enough that I actually would gladly go visit, is Egypt and others for the wildlife.”

            Observe that I said countries. Plural. And actually it was supposed to be “Egypt and others for the culture” but I did some editing and overlooked the mistake. With that said, I’ve researched Zanzibar. In fact, I’ve thoroughly researched 52 of Africa’s 56 countries. And of the 52, 47 of them don’t catch my interest much. At least not enough to warrant a visit. But yes, along with Egypt, I’m quite interested in Zanzibar, mainly the island of Unguja.

            • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

              @ TUK

              I swear, your disinterest in the motherland is so deep rooted! I’m friggin boggled.

              • kickandasnare

                boggled +2

              • That Ugly Kid

                Really? I honestly don’t see why this is such a big deal. Enlighten me. My disinterest in the majority of Africa is the same as other people’s disinterest in a specific music genre. Or disinterest in a TV show. Or food. Or clothes. I’m just not feeling it, that’s all. Simple.

                Or is this an issue because I’m black and I don’t love/worship Africa in its entirety? If I were white and I had no real interest in Africa and all her diversity, would I be getting these same reactions? Be honest.

                • http://afrikanmami.blogpsot.com African Mami

                  @ TUK,

                  Hun, do you boo boo! But my boggling still stands

                • MJoy
            • Superior Motherload

              By the way some (many) Egyptians don’t consider themselves African’s. Took a trip there and was frequently asked “Oh, you are from Africa?”. So maybe you need to add one other country.. how about Lake Malawi? http://www.traveldestinationinfo.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Lake-Malawi-6.jpg

          • http://asiyah3.wordpress.com Asiyah

            I forgot to list Zanzibar on my list of African “countries” (it’s still part of Tanzania) I long to visit. Such a beautiful place!

        • http://www.tessism.com Tessism

          I am nowhere near offended. I was perplexed but it’s not my problem. To each his own.

        • SheWhoMustBeObeyed

          We hear you. Oya clap for yourself!!

          • http://www.tessism.com Tessism

            Hahahaha! I couldn’t have said it any better & in broken. Thank you.

    • CNotes

      “If I ever travel outside the country, the FIRST place I’m going to is Brazil.”

      You may not want to return to the U.S. if you go to Brazil. I went in 2009 and all that I can say is……..everything you heard was true. : )

      • That Ugly Kid

        *Gasp* Oh my….

    • But…

      So you won’t step foot on a CONTINENT (capitalized for emphasis) because of isolated groups that sold your people into slavery, but you will gladly rep a country that raped and subjugated your ancestors and continues to treat your people as second-class citizens to this day?

      Listen, Africans are not begging for representation. I say this because I often run into this sentiment from Af-Ams as if they are doing us a favor by repping the motherland…or, furthermore, that in choosing NOT to rep the motherland they are sticking it to us in some way. Trust, this is not the case, in fact I think Africans have too much pride on our own, we don’t need any more, lol. You can choose to identify however you want, and I don’t fault Af-Ams for repping America (in fact, I consider you Americans with a distinct culture as well) but please check your reasoning for denying Africa and make sure it’s not laced in bitterness and a veiled attempt to “stick it to us” cause that just makes you look sad, especially since we don’t really care either way.

      • Djuobah

        +1. Why is it folks always bring up the argument of African selling fellow Africans. There were SOME Jews that took part in the holocaust (just like SOME Africans), but we rarely see this ever brought up. SMH.

  • Loving Me

    Good post… I dress for myself, I emulate (insert my govt name here) and I leave it at that BUT I will admit that the times I’ve tried to be the down to earth, soul, Jill Scott, Erykah Badu, Angie Stone, other black natural women in the media, I’ve looked a damn fool because… it’s just not me and everyone around me can see it. I hate when white people wear dreads. To me that is the biggest insult and most nastiest, ignorant statement that can be made. I’d rather see suburban kids with gold fronts and waxed up braids with their pants to their knees than a white person with dreads. I also hate when people make generic statements about their random black friends just because I’m around even though it has nothing to do with what we’re talking about:

    Me: I’m thinking of going to the mall and getting some new shoes
    Random white friend: Me and all my black friends love shopping for shoes. One day it was like 50 of us, I was the only white guy, in line for some Jordans
    Me:…………

    • Justmetheguy

      hahahaha! That was hilarious, but some of the random 2520s I met in college were like that and we used to mock them to their face for sh*ts and giggles because of their idiotic and transparent attempts at “being able to relate”. It just seems so phony and such a lazy and shallow way of finding common ground as humans. It was certainly only some of them though.

  • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

    Thank you very much for having touched upon this DIRE issue. I too have qualms with the following groups of people:

    1.) My African brethren emulating Black culture, and miserably failing at it.
    -Oh I cannot begin to talk of the horrors of it all. some African brothers are especially notorious for doing this, especially those that are fresh off the boat. They have the habit of instantaneously adopting fake black accents and for some reason thinking that white chicks are the shit and the urine, while we their sisters-who have borne and fed them are actually bull fecal matters. I remember in undergrad, this Naija broda who had a thick accent that pronounced the word carpenter as CAR-POONTA and insisted on ebonifying his African English. Oh my word! I held a council meeting with my fellow African girls, so that we could strategize the way forward with our broda. We were tired of being embarrassed by his stoooooooopidity. To make matters worse, he thought that it was very black of him to sag his pants and date white chicks recklessly. Oh mi gosh! At the rate he was going, he was going to catch a charge! Needless to say, we did talk to him and proud that, by the time of his graduation he had seen the error of his ways. Had somewhat gone back to embracing his African roots, and stopped the madness with white chicks.

    2.) Today at the bus stop. This white dude who was dressed like his favorite white rapper, Eminem and some Latino looking type of dude dapped @ other-using the “wassup my n-word”-I stared in horror at how that term casually rolled out their tongues. They proceeded to update each other on some rap battle that was going to take place over the weekend, and continued n-wording their entire conversation…..

    3.) Clueless folks both white and black about Africa. The motherland is not a monolith. Don’t ask STOOPID questions #that’s all.

    • A Woman’s Eyes

      #1 reminded me of the movie The Drop Squad

  • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

    C’mon slaves are free!!!!!! Stop massaing my comments. URRRRGH!

    • nillalatte

      lmao… you kill me.

      • http://afrikanmami.blogspot.com African Mami

        Queen,

        I’m ALWAYS being culturally appropriated into moderation because I’m too African for this blog. I ain’t tryna be anything else, but LAAWWWWWWD hammmmmercy!

  • Royale W. Cheese

    This blog post immediately brought this incident to mind…

    http://www.smh.com.au/sport/russian-ice-dance-offensive-but-legal-20100126-mwel.html

    …because the effort was earnest, but a disaster.