How “Braids,” Lupita Nyong’o’s Vogue Short, Captures Peak Black Woman Awesomeness » VSB

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How “Braids,” Lupita Nyong’o’s Vogue Short, Captures Peak Black Woman Awesomeness

YouTube screenshot via Vogue

 

I’ve taken great pains to avoid spending extensive amounts of time on Facebook. There are not enough crispy-chicken wraps in the world to help me bounce back from the deluge of unintentionally inaccurate Black history facts, passively racist status updates from college acquaintances, and awkward selfies from my uncle’s second ex-wife. I can even feel my blood sugar dropping as I write this.

Beyond all reason, however, the other day I moseyed my way onto Mark Zuckerberg’s social media cesspool. Fortunately for me, I was rewarded for my adventures in the form of a fantastic two-year-old original short film with Lupita N’yongo from Vogue.

Called “Braids,” the Austin Peters-directed spot was peak Black woman excellence. You’d be hard-pressed to find a Black woman who doesn’t identify with having a long-term relationship with her hair, and Lupita and her friends manage to capture a multitude of ways that hair can be a defining moment of a Black woman’s life.

1. The struggle of getting your hair done in school

I went to a college in southwest Virginia, an hour and a half south of Charlottesville, which would arguably be the closest major city to us. Getting my hair done during the semester was stressful. My one homegirl would just get it braided during breaks and have it redone whenever she went home. I won’t pretend to have been so enlightened as to know how to style my natural hair at the time other than with an occasional wash and go, so I had extensive stretches of severe heat damage from just constant flat-ironing. My ends were more brittle than Young Jeezy’s front teeth.

2. Not charging friends for services

For those living in remote college towns, there was almost always that one friend who had acquired just enough skill to help hold you over until your next hometown break, whether it was touching up your twists or keeping your lineup fresh. That one person who can do/cut hair is a valuable resource on any college campus, and if that person is also your good friend, you can probably get it done for the low or free. Don’t be this person. Drop a couple bucks. Your friend should at least be able to afford the occasional Wawa trip for making sure you’re not out here looking insanely raggedy.

3. Braiding shops in New York City that can be unbelievably frustrating

I could honestly write a thousand words on this alone. I can’t tell you how many times in the early aughts in Harlem I made an appointment to put box braids in my hair and had to deal with a stylist who was either always excessively late, intentionally overbooked or attempting to do wildly unhygienic nonsense, like trying to continue touching up your hair while eating lunch. What should have been a four- to six-hour affair ended up taking upward of 14 because the stylist stopped to talk to everyone and their momma while you were sitting in that chair.

The arguably worst part is that the best folks are out in the boonies and require planes, trains and automobiles to get to—shout-out to Tanti Celine in Park Hill, for whom I had to take the train to the ferry to the bus to get the waist-length straight backs that I had my sophomore year of high school. Also, shout-out to my friends for letting me burn every piece of evidence that displayed me in waist-length straight backs.

4. That one White girl who insists on doing her hair, too

There is always that one girl who has never seen women’s hair get braided/twisted/locked and inexplicably needs to get in on the experience. What tends to follow is a frustrating hour of using every product in the world to try to get Mary-Kate’s hair to hold a damn braid, although Lupita seems to have figured out how to work around that.

Lupita revealing herself as the Black hairstyling plug on her campus is just one of a multitude of reasons as to why she seems to be damn near perfect. Not only is she a dynamic actress who seems to be flat out incapable of looking bad in any color, but she is also dedicated to making sure her friends’ and family’s hair is laid whenever they walk out the door. That kind of Black woman solidarity is enough to put Lupita in the proverbial Homegirl Hall of Fame.

Shamira Ibrahim

Shamira is a twentysomething New Yorker who likes all things Dipset. You can join her in waxing poetically about chicken, Cam'ron, and gentrification (gotta have some balance) under the influence of varying amounts of brown liquor at her semi-monthly blog, shamspam.tumblr.com

  • “Your hair is your frame.” I love this quote from her!

    Also, how can a sista book Pita for some box braids? Her rate must be off the charts now, factoring in the lost wages in undergrad for doing hair for free and of course the Oscar ;)

    • Jennifer

      You better catch her before she wins a Tony this year. After that, she’s bound to retire from the braid game.

      • Ess Tee

        Yo, if she wins a Tony, her agent(s)/manager(s) gotta finagle a way to get her on some TV show guest spot, get an Emmy nomination and win, followed by doing some audio book for children which lands her a Grammy nom and win.

        I want Lupita to be an EGOT, dammit.

        • Jennifer

          YES!

        • Brandon Allen

          Can she sing? Maybe she can read a book on tape or something.

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  • LadyIbaka

    I DO NOT give two damn hoots, but all those African salons in Harlem need their licenses RECHEKED, REVOKED, RE-somethy’d! They are very, very, very, over, very, very UNHYGIENIC! The unprofessionalism displayed by MOST of these braiders/salon owners is beyond redemption.

    Case and point (one of many instances, different salons)

    Miss thang, had the audacity to put a USED, smelly towel over my shoulder. Common now! I told her off! She had the nerve to tell me how insulted she felt, because she takes pride in being clean. Madam Fatoumata Phakk ourra here.

    • AnswerMe

      The last one I remember going to was a few years ago. Thankfully they are clean but had to sit through 45min+ customer induced discussion about how light skinned women are conceited and all men want them and she basically teaches her daughter she’s better for being darker. Being the only light woman there at the time I received the occasional “But not you though.” semi apologetic smile and the owner trying to shush the braider chiming in. I had so much to contribute but only had that small patch left at the front. You know that tuft when you’ve been there for 8hrs and can see the light, so I remained silent.

    • Cleojonz

      I wouldn’t even call these African Hair braiding places salons. You so do NOT get a salon experience.

    • Kat

      Everybody I know who go to the Africans ain’t got no edges… so yea yo opinion on pretty much everything in life is dismissed. I don’t even ask them for recommendations on hair grease..we ain’t got but two or three good ones.

      • LadyIbaka

        Shoooo, who you telling!!!!

      • Beauty In Truth

        Yall so wild! Lol. I don’t know which Africans specifically as I would only be able to guess Nigerians? Or Kenyans? Ethiopians however are pretty good with our hair.

        They don’t braid too tight. I don’t wear braid styles anymore, but Ethiopians can do natural hair and they have all the same textures from 2c-4c that African American women have. Now who I don’t trust to do my hair is LA stylists. They will have you bald and attempt to charge you $500 at the end of it. Ah-no.

        The only shop that can get in my head is a few in NJ who have literally treated my hair the best in life, Virginia cause let’s be real, DMV girls never have a bad hair day.

        • Kat

          They not that plentiful around here. I’m loc’d up but if I ever decide to start back over I’ll keep this advice in mind…as long as you still got yo edges.

          • Beauty In Truth

            I do. And they is laid! Lol.

            • Kat

              Ima trust ya….lol

        • Kas

          Ethiopians? I’m assuming DC area?

    • Kas

      Perhaps you should switch to a Dominican spot?

      • You gotta be careful with them too.. heat damage is real.

        • Kas

          I heard the Black Cuban spots are the best. ;)

          • Brandon Allen

            He shoots!

            • Kas

              Nah, Negra being going in hard on folks. I’m trying to ensure that I stay on her good side. Related, if my “Jamaican” wife even dreams I am shooting on in these comment sections, I’m literally going to get shot. I don’t need those kind of problems.

              • Brandon Allen

                I feel you. Dont catch a cutlass to the gut.

                • Kas

                  Why West Indians can’t call it a machete like the rest of the Fred World I will never under. One of my boys (Trini) has the funniest story about him and his brother being chased around the house by his mom with a cutlass. Short version, they kept doing laps until they had a enough of a gap to get out the front door and jump the front gate. They both ran track up through college, and apparently they got their speed from their mom.

                  • I, totally, thought cutlass the car. lmao

                    never mind.

                    • Kas

                      Come on now!

                    • Me too! I mean, ya a s s could get run over for trying to run game in these e-streets!

                      My folks had a Cutlass Ciera that was too clean! It got flooded out in one of these Houston tropical storms though. I miss that car…

                    • Kas

                      Really, really not one West Indian friend . . . smdh, what is today’s youth coming to?

                    • Clearly I need to diversify :)

                    • I got West Indian friends… cutlass is new to me… machete or blade ..lol

                    • Tambra

                      Or Choppy. They will tell you that Vincentians are bosses with a cutlass, they will beat you with one and you would not get one cut.

                    • Kas

                      Oh I hadn’t heard that, though I’ve heard Trini Indians are notorious with a knife.

                    • haaaaaw

                    • KB

                      It wasn’t until college that I found out that when island folk refer to a cutlass, they’re talking about a machete lol.

                    • Kas

                      Junior year of college, go to a Jamaican restaurant with a Jamaican friend. My friend orders for both of us. I turn to him after and ask of they were speaking English and I wasn’t joking. Senior year of college, my Dutch girlfriend attends one of my family events. After watching a few of us playing dominoes, including my grandfather and uncle, she turns to me and asks if they are speaking English. My family is not West Indian . . .

                    • Tambra

                      Lol, so very possible.

              • I’m so nice… I just have little patience for foolishness. lmao

                • Kas

                  You apparently haven’t been paying attention to my posts. I’m hellavu foolish. Hence, the need for accruing brownie points.

                  • Maybe trying me… is a better choice… I was bullied as a child…didn’t work out well for the bully but you get my point…lol

          • I worked in a couple of spots… before they became popular.. at the time they only wanted to serve latinas…they were shytty as heII to black Americans… I had to clown a few times…

            Be mindful of who gets your money and they were always pressing black women to get relaxers.. foh

            amyway, Latinas don’t want to pay cuz their cousin can do a blowout or rollos for free.. they only pay for color….

        • Asiyah

          I was about to say this. Some of them also lack emotional intelligence or maybe they’re desensitized to heat at this point in their lives because they put you in la secadora without the things to cover your ears and your hearing appendages are on fire :(

          • They know what to do… they’re being pendejas.

            • Kas

              Earmuffs

            • Asiyah

              That’s been my conclusion 9 out of 10 times this has happened to me. I tend to avoid hair salons altogether at this point.

        • PhlyyPhree

          Look. I tried it once. Not only did I come out looking like I was ready for My First Quinciera, but my curl pattern was gone and I ended up losing about 3 inches to heat damage

          • Lmao!!!!!I spit out my yak… get on somewhere…lmao

          • Quirlygirly

            I thank God I have a tough scalp and hair that hung on for dear life. I was convinced them Dominicans was trying to make me look like a bald headed chicken out here. I got my hair done by them 2x. My hair did look nice after but I am sure my hair was damaged. I ended up cutting it off because I went through a depressive state and needed a change but once I got myself together, I knew not to go back to them again.

      • LadyIbaka

        I’m loc’d now. But in the case I wasn’t, I had found a lady who did an excellent job doing basic braids, and she was CLEAN! Her house smelled good, was highly professional, on time! Didn’t talk on the phone.

    • Ess Tee

      I’ve been wanting Senegalese twists for soooo long (and with summer approaching, that itch is getting itchier), but I love my edges too too much to subject them to the trauma!

      • miss t-lee

        I think I’m gonna get some this summer, but they’ll be crochet style. I no longer have the patience to sit 8-10 hours.

        • Ess Tee

          Oh! Why didn’t I think of getting them crocheted?! Girl, thank you! I may just end up doing that this summer.

          • miss t-lee

            Oh yeah girl…they make all kinds of styles for crochet these days. :)

      • PhlyyPhree

        This is why I have a cosmetology license from YouTube.
        Everything I ever wanted done to my hair? I learned from the tube.
        Marley/Senegalese twists?
        Box braids?
        Fake locs?
        Sew-ins?
        Crochets?
        Dye/Bleach?
        The tube. I don’t have time or patience for anything else anymore.

        • Tambra

          Even with the University of YouTube I am not that proficient. Maybe I am not patient enough to be practising.

        • Ess Tee

          Thanks to YouTube University, I did put in some faux locs. However, because I don’t have the finger dexterity of these fast azz braiders and whatnot, it took me forever *insert Cardi B turn over the shoulder* to finish them.

          • PhlyyPhree

            I wont put in locs anymore because I don’t have the personal patience and it’s not like they made me look THAT good. I’m ok with twists now. The first time I put in twists? It was a struggle. Now???? I just need 4-6 hours depending on length of the twists and length of my nails. Lol

            • Tambra

              I like my hair looking neat when it is done. And I know if I attempt to do it it will not get that finished look. It is for that reason I prefer to pay to get my car cleaned than clean it my self.

              • PhlyyPhree

                Oh, I’m very an al about everything looking neat and professional when I’m done. I don’t walk outside looking homemade. I’ve been around enough cosmetologists et al, that at this point in my life, I can make sure that I have all of the finishing touches for myself. The best feeling is having someone walk up to me and ask where I got my hair done and being able to say I did them myself and then be asked how much I charge.

                • Tambra

                  I am officially jealous of that skill.

                  • PhlyyPhree

                    Lol. Practice. Or obsessiveness.
                    Whatever you want to call it. I’m a firm believer in doing it until I get it done right. That especially applies to my crown.

                    • Tambra

                      That’s it . I have been promising to up my makeup game. I will be presentable, but I still need that extra umph, but as you said. Practise.

            • Ess Tee

              At this moment, I’m actually plotting on how to get my mother to put these crocheted Senegalese twists in my hair come summer time lol.

              I also liked the way my locs came out. For the five weeks I had them in, I was like, Maybe I could actually rock locs. I realized that I liked being able to wear my hair loose, too, so no real locs any time soon.

        • Baemie St. Patrick

          !! My mama used to crochet and box braid my hair in the 90’s. I’ll be daggoned if I’m paying $100 for some stuff I can do in my kitchen.

          • PhlyyPhree

            EX-ACTLY. If I can do it myself? Why would I pay someone else for it?

            • Kas

              That’s how my $50 plumbing jobs turn into $500 ones. But, go on, do you. :)

              • PhlyyPhree

                LMAOOO. I understand that sentiment but this only applies to things that I already have a reasonable familiarity and dexterity with. Also, it only relates to things where the cost of failure and repair is not higher than the cost of just getting a professional from the outset. If EYE mess up some braids? No worries. I can redo them until I get them right. If EYE try to change fix the leak in the bathroom? Yeaaaa, nah. We’ll call Tidy Toilet.

            • AnswerMe

              Been doing my own crochets (outside of cornrowing bc I haven’t practiced enough to get that right on myself) and always get compliments. They aren’t difficult at all.

      • LadyIbaka

        If you can get a friend to refer you to someone who does in home braiding, much better. I would NOT advise you to go to these STUPID salons with not a bit of any common sense and care for clients!

  • Jennifer

    “Not only is she a dynamic actress who seems to be flat out incapable of looking bad in any color, but she is also dedicated to making sure her friends’ and family’s hair is laid whenever they walk out the door. ”

    I learned a couple weekends ago that she even looks flawless while portraying a young girl caught up during the Liberian civil war. Go see ECLIPSED if you’re in NYC, y’all.

    I remember when this video came out. It’s only one of the many reasons I developed my women crush for her after 12 Years A Slave.

  • Jennifer

    #1 is so real. After a childhood full of relaxers, I found myself in college in NH with struggle hair. Other than the occasional stylist who would come up from Boston to do hair at exorbitant rates, I had to learn via trial and error or depend on the kindness of my friends (shout out to Leslie who kept me touched up through the 99 and the 2000). Other than that, I would occasionally get braided in H-town during break.

    During my senior year, the local hair salon finally got a “black stylist.” Why is that in quotes, you ask? Cuz the NH salon sent its one black employee (the receptionist) to hair school IN NH. Did I mention she had been adopted by a white family in VT when she was young girl? She didn’t even know how to do her own hair. (The levels to this ish!) 21 year old Jennifer was just happy to have a place to go, but the “black stylist” did not do right by me.

    This was a big part of the reason I went natural 3 years later.

    • I have always wondered why white adoptive families neglect to educate themselves about the nuances that come with raising a black child. You can slide with little black boys and their hair care, but you can’t just try and do whatever with little black girls. Their hair needs special care and attention.

      • Deeds

        They’re probably “colorblind”

        • ChokeOnThisTea

          Staahhp it! lol

      • On my daughter’s old Cheer squad… a white lady had adopted a black Colombian girl with a huge fro… poor girl was losing her hair… this Biaaaaatch was complaining about not knowing what to do…. because I have no home training.. I asked why would she adopt a black child and not learn how to care for her hair?

        She was pissed but I gave her a list and a stylist and told her that she was responsible for that girl’s self esteem… she brought her back with a relaxer.. my face..

        • Ess Tee

          You know ol’ girl was probably more caught up in being that little girl’s savior and didn’t think through the actual, day-to-day reality of what it would mean to raise a Black daughter.

        • But to be fair, the (black?) stylist may have encouraged it. Where I’m from, growing up it was almost a given that you got a perm, I never had a choice in the matter, nor did I honestly realize there was the option of not have a relaxer (I thought locs was the only other option without a perm). Which is interested, since my mother didn’t start getting perms until she was an adult. I’ve been natural for seven years now and I’m desperately trying to convince my sister to let my niece transition, since she wants to be natural as well.

          • ChokeOnThisTea

            “Where I’m from, growing up it was almost a given that you got a perm, I never had a choice in the matter, nor did I honestly realize there was the option of not have a relaxer…Which is interested, since my mother didn’t start getting perms until she was an adult.”
            This. This is most 80s/90s babies black girls’ experiences.

          • Kas

            Natural hair is not embraced by the majority of Black Americans (African Americans maybe slightly more).

            • Wait, what’s the difference? Lol.

            • Deeds

              Is this supposed to be the difference between couth and uncouth black folk.

              • Kas

                People who self define as Black do less well economically than people who self define as African American. I think of people who self define as Black to be more old school and hence more socially conservative. So i assume that people that self define as African American are more likely to be accepting of natural hairstyles. Not a matter of couth or uncouth.

                • Hmmm. I see where you’re coming from, but I think I personally use either interchangeably so I’m not sure what that would mean for me, lol.

                  • Kas

                    I threw it out there jokingly, didn’t mean to turn it into a major talking point. I self define as Black but prefer natural hair (at least if you have good hair, sorry couldn’t resist since everyone is side eyeing me on my initial post).

                    • Kas, I can’t with you sometimes!

        • Smh, this is why I’ve never been a fan of white people adopting children who also aren’t white. White people don’t know how to raise children to be aware and cognizant that the world around them will treat them like s h i t regardless of the fact that some white woman/man raised them.

          • Kas

            I’m going to disagree with you on this one. I would much prefer a Black child be adopted by the whitest person ever, than go through the foster care system. Life will show them soon enough that shyt ain’t fair. Better they should have a loving family when that finally occurs. I was raised in a lower economic and Black neighborhood. My parents didn’t allow excuses for anything (teacher didn’t like me, Johnnie was mean, etc.). As an adult, my Dad said this was because he knew life was unfair and I needed to learn how to deal with it. My point is I didn’t really deal with racism (or at least know I was dealing with racism) until college. By then, I was secure enough in myself as a person that I could deal with it and not let it deter me.

          • Yep

      • Jennifer

        I volunteered with an after-school program for adoptive black and brown kids during college. This was in the days before online forums, YouTube videos, and Black Hair, Vanilla Care. Things are much better now.

        But, when I think of the advice that we as college students had to give to white parents, it still makes me mad: “There’s nothing wrong with his skin, he just needs lotion” or “No, it’s not a good idea to cut out your child’s hair because you can’t comb it” or “Please don’t put another relaxer on your baby’s head.”

        *sigh*

        • Lord, they didn’t know about lotion and “ash”? But like, why wouldn’t they just normally lotion the child? Those questions make me sad for those kiddos…

          • Blueberry01

            One of my white coworkers was watching me put on hand lotion and he asked if he could have some because his hands are a little “chapped”. I giggled…

          • CozyVon

            I think it’s simply an “out of sight, out of mind” thing for them. Ash doesn’t show up as much on them, so they don’t know when their skin is dry. (Actually, that’s my theory as to partly why we age better than they do–because we’re constantly moisturizing, lol)

      • Asiyah

        I read somewhere that there’s a website now for non-Black parents who adopted Black children that teaches them how to do their hair. I say that’s a long time coming.

        • AlwaysCC

          there’s a popular site (chocolate hair, vanilla care – i’m not gonna link out of respect) that a lot of people like. but there are so many youtube videos now that there is no excuse*

          *i don’t do my own hair lol

          • Asiyah

            lol I can do my own hair but don’t even bother because it takes me 3.5 hours to blow dry it. Straight is considered the preferred type but I’m sorry it’s too much work.

        • CozyVon

          I’ve always said that a hair stylist could make a ton of money marketing services & info products to white parents of black & biracial kids who don’t know jack about black hair.

      • CozyVon

        Because they’re on the “we’re all the same” boat, just floatin’ down the River of Denial…

    • Had the same struggle! I’d make sure to schedule a hair appointment whenever I went home, I didn’t know what to do with my hair except wash and do a half-decent flat iron that took two hours! I didn’t go natural until two years after college and being able to take care of my own hair is the greatest freedom! I have braids now but haven’t been to a salon in four years!

  • PDL – Cape Girl

    When my kid was little, I would braid her hair and but the big wooden beads on. EVERYBODY would ask if she went to an African shop. Didn’t take me long to perfect. Long thick braids….so pretty

  • Courtney Wheeler

    Lupita is the girl in your office that even looks amazingly stylish..even on casual Friday.

  • Thank God that I went to school with a grip of black girls who could do hair and recommend places in the city to get it done when need be. DC was pricey though, and for the amount those salons charged for a decent blow out, I mainly did my own hair throughout school and went to my stylist back home on breaks.

  • cakes_and_pies

    I love Lupita, but my scalp hurts watching her pull that lady’s hair for braiding.

    • Lol I haven’t gotten braids in two years after a bad experience with my edges. My hair/scalp can’t withstand that kind of tension

      • cakes_and_pies

        I’ve had the fortune of keeping my edges after 2 years of crotchet braids and regular braids, but I’m not finna let my edges get all Tamar before I stop.

        • Tambra

          It is for that reason I do not retwist hair too often. I need and like my hairline. I don’t need this at all

          • Kas

            Yes, just sad. I have a friend who is morphing into that picture.

            • Tambra

              My concern is that it does not get that way over night. You must notice the receding line, do something.

              • Kas

                It did not. We are on separate coasts now, so I see her at best every other year. Just noticed how bad it was on a recent picture. Not a good way to have that discussion just like it wasn’t a good way to discuss the drop off in the look of her weave when she switched beauticians to save money. I talk a lot shitz on these boards but I’m not about to hurt my friends feelings over something as superficial as hair.

                • Tambra

                  I understand, but it takes a really good friend to stage an intervention. But there is still hope.

                  • Kas

                    She has battled her hair since I’ve known her. I’m not about to try to overcome a lifetime of her mom complaining about her getting her dad’s hair instead of her mom’s. These are the kind of things you learn when you get mani-pedis together. At some point she will have no choice but to chop it off. She has great bone structure so she will be fine. In the meantime, she can wear hair down to her waist.

                    • Tambra

                      Ahh the “good hair” and “bad hair” crap. That seriously plays with the psyche’s of some individual. I know a woman who never reveals her natural hair. It is always weaves and wigs. .

                    • CozyVon

                      What I can’t understand is how some of these women wanna put natural chicks down for their hair being “too nappy”…but ain’t seen their edges or own hair since the Clinton Administration…SMDH

                    • Tambra

                      Exactly, and your natural hair actually grows out of your scalp .*gasp*

                  • CozyVon

                    What in the George Jefferson…?!!??!!?

        • Her and Naomi Campbell really baffle me. I cannot fathom why these women don’t have access to stylists who care about the health of their hair. That is crazy that they pay those people top dollar for wigs/weaves but won’t invest in a healthy scalp of hair.

          • Quirlygirly

            I know! They have the money and connects to not have these tragic edges. I can kinda give a pass to a less wealthy person( I say kinda because there are too many products on the market to help with this issue) but for those who have some some money, it is really unacceptable.

          • cakes_and_pies

            That’s permanent traction alopecia. All they can do at that point is maintain the mange/patches that they have to adequately secure their wigs to.

      • Tambra

        Me too, though I rock dreadlocks. Can’t deal with the tension. I remember taking out my hair style about 45 minutes after it was done, that was after wasting about 5 hours in the salon, because I felt my head was going to explode. It took me a good week before I could comfortably touch my scalp again without feeling pain.

  • Detroit Skater

    i am not knocking sista lupita’s hustle by any means, but ummm…. she looks heavy handed. i was wincing all through that video. *snicker*

    i actually decided to loc 10 years ago b/c my braider had to get a 9 to 5. i miss her and i tell ya if she every said i’m back to braiding i’d grow out of my locs.

    • ChokeOnThisTea

      Ayee to us loc’d sistas!
      I will say though, right before I decided to loc my hair, EYYYEEEE was the one who brought Poetic Justice Box Braids back into style circa ’07-09. NOT Solange. Hehe

  • TeeChantel

    I appreciate a good hair braider cause I can’t braid. But thank God for my hair braider in Trenton (Hey, Kadi!) She is the only African hair braiding shop I have gone to for more than 15 years. I now live in Maryland and you best believe when I want braids, I will go back to her and only her.

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