Hey Y’all, I Think My Mother Is Voting For Donald Trump » VSB

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Hey Y’all, I Think My Mother Is Voting For Donald Trump

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First things first, I PJ, would like to state up front that I can talk about my mama, but the rest of you people cannot. Cool? Cool. Also, I am lucky enough to have two mothers: this piece speaks of my mother in Michigan, who is originally from France. And white. And awesome so put some respeck on her name because my “delete-finger” game is mean, b.

With that being said, I’m not 100 percent sure, but I think my mother is voting for Donald Trump. And the reason I say I’m not 100 percent sure is because she’s never come right out and said it, but I’ve got an inkling. It’s as awkward to type as it is to read. Let’s talk about how we got here.

My mother hates Hillary Clinton. Not dislikes, but a real, visceral hatred for Hillary. It’s so palpable you’d think they knew one another and Hillary stole her man many moons ago, but my mother has never met her. She’s never seen her in person or been in the same room as her. My mother just hates her. She hates her ankles. She thinks Hillary is going to take away her guns, freedoms, pets, land, home, etc. I’m being facetious, but that’s how it sounds when talking to my mother about Hillary Clinton.

My mother is also a “gun nut”, which just means she believes fervently in her 2nd amendment right to bear arms. She’s an active member of the NRA and attends conventions. Once, she found “the token Black guy” at the convention and took a picture of him and sent it to me, framed, to prove that Black people are part of the NRA since I found that hard to believe. Obviously Black folks love our guns just like every other American, but the NRA seems not to give two fucks about Black people. I didn’t realize it at the time, but taking the picture and sending it to me might have been one racist ass thing to do. My mother isn’t a racist but she has definitely joked about taking me to a plantation. To my friends. Who all attended an HBCU with me. We have a fun relationship.

I will say that I do not think being the mother of Black/bi-racial children does not preclude you from being racist. I also think there are quite a few well educated racists who don’t realize that they are. This isn’t my mother. For the record.

As you can guess, my mother is a Republican. On her home refrigerator is a magnet of George W. Bush amidst other Republican-ideal magnets and cartoons. My mother, a native of France who is now an American citizen, is a card-carrying NRA Republican. I don’t mind her being a Republican by the way. I do find it humorous that this foreign woman who has two bi-racial children who are pretty Black-fist with it happens to be pretty ultra conservative in her ideologies, but the truth is, she really cares about two things: Obamacare and guns. And on both of those, she’s pretty anti-Democrat, and specifically anti-Obama. To be fair, my mother and step-father were one of those folks who got fucked long and hard by Obamacare.

My family is an interesting one to say the least.

Let’s get back to my mother voting for Trump. Now, don’t get me wrong, my mother doesn’t actually seem to like Donald Trump. I was in Michigan over the past week and a half and even while driving around her area of southeast Michigan, every time we saw a Trump sign, or barn painted with “Make America Great Again”, etc. she remarked at her surprise at living in Trump country and hasn’t exactly spoken of him in glowing terms, at all. So her potential vote for Trump isn’t even about…Trump. By the way, I saw way more Trump-supportive signage and messaging than I was expecting to see considering that my mother lives only an hour west of Detroit.

Nope, she’s one of the anti-Hillary crowd. She hates Hillary Clinton so much that there’s almost zero chance that she could find one iota of a reason to cast her ballot that way. I doubt she would ever entertain voting for Jill Stein or the other guy, which means its either Trump or not voting at all. And because she became a citizen so she could vote, I can’t imagine her NOT voting, or skipping the most important section on the ballot.

Full disclosure, I pretty much can’t stand anybody up for election. I don’t care for Hillary even a little bit and well, Trump, shouldn’t even be here. But these are the options and there’s no way I’m going to chance my vote. I can totally understand being anti-Hillary. There’s enough non-sense on both sides, I think, where American people should be able to request new candidates, but that’s not how this works. That’s not how any of this works. And I’m also not one of those people who thinks that Trump winning might spark the political revolution we need. While I don’t think my personal life will be ruined if Trump were elected, I also don’t want that man being the face of my nation since I feel like we might be on the brink of World War III – MXV if he were to be president. Still, voting for Trump seems patently absurd to me.

And I do think Hillary is going to win, even if my mother does Bush the button for Trump. But still, Trump isn’t supposed to be here but he is so the idea that voting against Hillary could result in a noted bigot taking the oath of office is troubling on many, many fronts.

And yet here we are. My mother, the woman who birthed me and who I love very much, might actually cast a ballot for a man asking white people for the Black vote by telling Black folks that America is pretty much shit for us so what do you have to lose? A man who has openly mocked several minority groups without a second thought because she somehow thinks that Hillary Clinton will exercise some power that she does not have and send the National Guard on a raid of homes nationwide and take away her guns.

This is my family.

Thanks, Obama.

Panama Jackson

Panama Jackson is pretty fly (and gorgeous) for a light guy. He used to ship his frito to Tito in the District, but shipping prices increased so he moved there to save money. He refuses to eat cocaine chicken. When he's not saving humanity with his words or making music with his mouth, you can find him at your mama's mama's house drinking her fine liquors. Most importantly, he believes the children are our future. You can hit him on his hitter at panamadjackson@gmail.com.

  • YeaSoh

    Well PJ if we can’t talk about your mama then why are we having this discussion?

    • miss t-lee

      I seriously just said that.

    • panamajackson

      A brotha can’t share? You can find respectful ways to say, wow…or WTF. Or not…lol. But my memory is long.

      • kingpinenut

        smgdh lol

        You askin a lot bruh a whole HEYALL of ALOT

      • YeaSoh

        I’m just sayin we all here because… Never mind

      • Nik White

        Dude I’m just wondering when the VSB meet up is gone happen in Detroit? You were right here!

        • panamajackson

          Not only was I right there…I was back there for a week and a half two weeks ago. But…I’ll explain that in another post.

        • Let’s put one together.

          • Nik White

            Hmm – I only know about 3 of us that are here (maybe there are lurkers). If PJ or Damon put out the call folks will come out of the woodwork.

    • Aly

      Good question.

    • Are y’all kidding me? If I was PJ I would be so petty right now.

      • YeaSoh

        I mean he brought it up tho

        • And none of y’all follow him on social media.

          • YeaSoh

            I don’t have social media so no

  • Cocoa from DC

    Interesting that articles on this site (which I love, lurker for many a moon) are never critical of Hilary’s criminal acts, impudence to criticism, shuck and jiving campaign strategies, and her role in creating the school to prison pipeline. Black people have bought into this dualistic idea of having to vote for someone. Racial pride aside with the Obama 8, not one democrat has improved the lives of black people. When I say this in conversation, I often hear, “the president is for all people not just blacks.” I’m also a part of the lgbt community and a woman, and when gather with, there is an outcry and demand that the president specifically address and enact legistlation to support and prop up those disenfranchised groups. I’m wondering why racism is treated, by us, as an issue that should be fixed by individuals and not be government policy, policy that created the racist cloud we live under each day. I’ve never felt racial tension so high or a militaristic approach so stark as I do now. We don’t criticize the ways in which Obama and Clinton have militarized the police forces who almost seem to mandate the killing of young black men. Hilary has a track record of not just not caring or hating black people but putting them in very real positions of oppressions. Maybe voting isn’t the answer for us.

    • Brooklyn_Bruin

      It’s primarily in the comments where you hear all that.

      But don’t worry, whoever is elected president, local law enforcement will still keep the black status quo.

      • Cocoa from DC

        Not in these comment sections fam. Also, I was asking about the authors not the commentators.

        • LMNOP

          People have a lot of opinions in these comment sections.

    • Junegirl627

      See this is where I get confused. I mean I know how both Bush criminal acts have negatively effected my life….. How has Hillary Clintons “criminal acts” effected yours. Oh an yes I do have a problem with the whole “super criminal” “brought to heel” statements. but you know what she didn’t say anything different for everybody else campaigning on BOTH sides of the aisle. What I want to know is what legislation came as a direct result of her speech and language. that wasn’t already on the fast track to becoming law.

      I say this because everybody wants to blame hillary like all the broken window policies and 3 strike laws that came up around the time she was calling young black kids super criminals are because she made a few calls and taaa daaahhh detrimental reforms were created and that’s just not the case. The only difference is that she apologized and has tried to move past it..

      • This I agree with. How the CBC has jumped through all the hoops to Well Actually the 1994 Crime Bill are dumb.

        • Junegirl627

          I’m sorry I hate acronyms because I can never remember what they stand for. What’s the CBC?

          • Val

            Congressional Black Caucus.

            • Junegirl627

              Thank YOU!!! always clutch Val :)

        • Junegirl627

          Exactly what I am talking about. Back then Older black people were with the Clintons on this mess. They respectability politic’d the FLuck out of the that crime bill. I swear Preachers were practically saying that the lion will lay with the lamb if we:
          1. Dont have sezz
          2. Stop listening to rap music and pull up our pants
          3. Get harder on crime and teach these little kids a lesson
          4. Keep ourselves out of Jail and be better fathers to our sons.

          Shyte people still saying that crap. The hard truth is that the Clintons didn’t get elected despite that stance. They got elected because of it. Now all the people who supported that mess wanna be mad at Hillary like they wasn’t sitting right there nodding their heads in agreement.

          • But when I point stuff like this out, I’m being way too hard on Congressman so and so and don’t understand. *eyeroll* I’m not naive to the conditions that led to the crime bill in the first place, but could they at least admit they screwed up? Oh and CBC stands for Congressional Black Caucus.

      • mssporadic

        Thank you for articulating a point I have been able to. I feel like they are assigning Bill’s policies or those of Congress at that time to her, but she wasn’t a policy maker at that time.

    • cryssi

      I’m guessing they’re realists who don’t want to be hypocritical. They’re voting for her, so why waste time complaining. These are our options and we have to deal. Sure you could vote for those other two, but that’s a risky gamble.

      • Cocoa from DC

        I’m really saddened by this thread because, not to be rude, I was under the impression that this was a forum where critical thinking could thrive and we could be open and honest. It’s dangerous to say, as the commenter did above, “the whole super criminal thing” as if to downplay how that legislation has statistically near ruined the progress of African Americans in this country. I grew up in the hood in DC. Everybody’s father except mine in my neighborhood went jail for small amount of weed on their person. I don’t see that as something to make light of. Also, why can’t I hold a grudge for that and hold her to task for more than an apology? What about how her husbands policies crippled Haiti? Why are black people so forgiving of this woman and her family? I don’t think Black people have been given a choice in this election and recognizing that and choosing to remove ourselves from this oligarchal carousel can be revolutionary. I don’t like being pimped.

        • Tambra

          Haiti, I think Haiti’s problem goes back to about 1825.. there abouts.. France, indemnity.

          • Cocoa from DC

            Are you unfamiliar with the flooding of Rice in Hatian markets as a way to boost American markets? Are you also unfamiliar with the Donation Fraud that his Foundation was investigated for in 2015? Why we gotta make so many excuses?

            That’s like telling a girl that the man who beat her shouldn’t be held to task because she chose him, only because her father raped her. Makes no sense.

            • Tambra

              And I am saying that the Haitain economy was in shambles by 1900. Upon attaining independence in 1804 Haiti was hit by an economic embargo, she had no trading partners. Further, in 1825 already economically weakened having not recovered form the Revolution she had to pay France an indemnity of 150 million French Francs which was reduced to 90 million. So the rice situation while it did not help, didn’t really make Haiti worse off. Further if you are going down that line you might as well start talking about Reaganomics and CBI and how it did not help Caribbean economies.

              • Cocoa from DC

                This is conflation. Also, I’m not sure you have a real understanding of the Haiting economic model at the time these policies were enacted.

                That aside, are you saying, in this comment, that Clinton’s policies, which destroyed an essential component of Haiti’s economy is okay because of France? If I were in France, I’d hold them accountable. But when you have a political dynasty that is intent of oppressing black people, at home and abroad, how can we sit idly by and let it go like our pain means nothing?

                • Hugh Akston

                  Haitian*

                • Tambra

                  I am not conflating the issue. You gave the impression that the Haitian economy was booming. The fact it is was the worst in the Caribbean. You are missing the point that the Haitian economy was destroyed and Clinton’s policy was an carry over of Reaganomics. A lot of niche industries in the Caribbean such as coconut oil production were steadily being destroyed since the 1980s under Reagan. So you can not start at the middle without going from the beginning.

                  • Cocoa from DC

                    When did I say it was booming? And why are you going so hard at me and giving a pass to Bill Clinton? He was the one with the power to help Haiti. Are you okay with him doing the opposite from his position of power? Is that the kind of governor we should hope for as a people? Do Jewish people not hold American politicians to task for their dealings with Israel?

                    • Tambra

                      As I said I have no dog in this fight. I am not going hard at you. Either which way us Caribbean people are messed. American presidents look out for American businesses first and those who are lobbying them, so Clinton did not worse than any other. The Caribbean’s importance to the US stands only in security after all we are just its ‘soft underbelly’. Jewish people can call politicians to task because of their wealth. All we have is just seawater and sand.

                    • Cocoa from DC

                      I know it wasn’t a joke but I did laugh at “seawater and sand”…aint that the truth.

                    • Tambra

                      It’s cool. The beauty of being a West Indian we are good at laughing at our own folly.

            • Hugh Akston

              As someone who actually have lived, worked in Haiti, and actually worked with that foundation very briefly…let’s just say…it’s complicated

              • Cocoa from DC

                I know, i’ve lived and worked there too. I don’t mean to make it simplistic at all. Nor do I mean to make any issue that we face in the diaspora simplistic. I’m simply saying let’s not cape and act like either one of these candidates will enact policy that will help us. Their track records are both a history of oppressing us. We can’t accept the status quo either.

                • Hugh Akston

                  i’ve actually already said that in other posts…so…

                  • Cocoa from DC

                    i’m not sure i even understand what this comment means…

                    • Hugh Akston

                      ” I’m simply saying let’s not cape and act like either one of these candidates will enact policy that will help us. Their track records are both a history of oppressing us.”

                      i’ve said things similar to this elsewhere

                      and many others have as well…

                    • Guest

                      Your passion is misinterpreting a lot of what people are saying here. Most of the people here DO NOT LIKE HILLARY, but a vote for TRUMP is WORSE, and a vote for Jill Stein is a waste. You’re misintreperting voting for is somehow her as a vote for liking her–it’s not. The Clinton’s track record is very well known–inside and outside the US. But in this election season, she’s the lesser of two evils–like every election before her, which in itself is quite sad. But the two party system has to go through a serious overhaul in order to fix the massive amounts of corruption in Washington. At this point though, we are still trying to figure out how to accomplish this, hence a lot of the–it’s complicated.

          • Hugh Akston

            1804*

            • Tambra

              That was independence, the demand for indemnity came much later, that was to secure said independence.

              • Hugh Akston

                (oh i know, i was just saying Haiti’s problems began as soon as it gained its independence as it was still trying to stabilize itself)

                • Tambra

                  I understand. But the indemnity clearly hit Haiti for 6 and it was game over. Plus a series of bad leaders did not help.

                  • Hugh Akston

                    We agree

                    • Tambra

                      Yeah. Cocoa managed to get me talk about politics and I avoid any such talk. But all in all it was a good non-productive day. What I needed.

                  • Haiti suffers from an acute case of what I call David Dinkins syndrome: being both bad and unlucky. And then I read the part of Haiti’s history where Germany stuck Haiti for a bundle… Pretty much because they could. Like WTF?

                    • Tambra

                      Haiti from the Pearl of the Antilles to the leach that is not coming off. Haiti’s mistake was seeking independence at a time when slavery and colonisation was the status quo, if that makes sense
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PDuOxwAS3I

                    • Hugh Akston

                      most Americans don’t know Haiti’s history and it’s history with the world and the US

                      Germany is another story altogether

                    • Tambra

                      That was the period when the US was seriously trying to buy as many Caribbean islands a possible.

        • cryssi

          I don’t think we can switch our citizenship that fast.

          • Cocoa from DC

            I never said anything about changing citizenship. I’m talking about not participating in a system we know will oppress and kill us and use our efforts to strengthen our communities from within.

            • Junegirl627

              Or you can see the truth that is before you.

              1. There is a candidate that we are all pretty unified in believing will keep the status quo and do nothing revolutionary to help the plight of brown people.

              and

              2. There is another candidate who has made it pretty clear that the first thing he is going to do as president is everything he can to start the race war we all joke about and make sure that as commander and chief he will make sure the most heavily armed nation on the planet will not only choose a side instead of stop the shennanigans. He will choose YT all day everyday at home an abroad.

              Not voting and any vote that is not for clinton helps the anti-darkie. accept it. and then volunteer for a grass roots campaign. foster and build awareness in your community now so that four years from now an alt-party candidate who is for black and brown people has a chance.

              • Cocoa from DC

                What is very sad, is that we can’t see that maintaining the status quo (which you helped create) is inherently anti-Black.

                • Junegirl627

                  inherently anti-black and out right hatred and government sanctioned racism is 2 totally different things.

                  Keep in mind racism can have negative effects on people. Imagine how black and brown people will be treated if racism is viewed in an out right positive light. Plus remember there are 3 supreme court seats up for grabs. The person who becomes president is gonna go young so that whoever sits on the bench will effect the laws of america for the next 30- 40 years.

                  Who do you as a minoirty & member of LGBTQ believe will put on the bench someone who believes in your right to be ALIVE forget about free?!!!

                  • Cocoa from DC

                    It’s interesting that this is your stance. By your argument, a racist president means black lives are in greater danger. Are you, then, calling our current president a racist, under whom, state killings (not just towards African Americans) have been a major issue in this country? You’re not making sense.

                    I’m a black woman before anything else, so my concern is what happens to Black people. No one knows I’m lesbian until I say I am or introduce them to my partner.

                    Don’t buy into the hype. Black people don’t have the right to be alive right now. Donald Trump clearly won’t become president but your fear mongering is borderline ridiculous.

                    • Junegirl627

                      “By your argument, a racist president means black lives are in greater danger. Are you, then, calling our current president a racist, under whom, state killings (not just towards African Americans) have been a major issue in this country? You’re not making sense.”

                      No, I am saying that if these are the type of atrocities that are committed again black and brown people when racism if viewed in a negative light and discouraged. what the fluck do you think will happen when racism is encouraged, promoted, with no stigma. It is bad in this country for black and brown but it has been worse and can be worse if Trump is elected. Look at the world around you and the empowerment racist are feeling because Trump is a viable candidate. They are unafraid to say and act on their out right views of black and brown people as the enemy. They don’t feel alone or cut off from each other now. They are not going to get better if Clinton loses it is going to get worse.

                    • Cocoa from DC

                      I see what you’re saying. I honestly think you’re giving Donald Trump too much power. Using France as an example, back when I did my study abroad there, some number of years ago before I thought a black president was legal, I was shocked by just how racist the country was. Now we see a resurgence in racism but I venture to say that that has everything to do with Obama’s policies in the middle East (and Bush and Bush and Clinton) that has created a rift between Muslims and the European countries who use their women’s bodies as weapons of war. Also, the flooding of refugees in European countries has caused unrest. This has absolutely nothing to do with Trump. When I’m abroad Trump is a joke. They know how to read polls overseas too.

                    • Junegirl627

                      “Donald Trump clearly won’t become president but your fear mongering is borderline ridiculous.”

                      It isn’t fear mongering when black people are being attacked for being black at Trump rallies.

                      You can hate Clinton all you want but don’t act like Trump being taken seriously hasn’t empowered racists to do more and say more anti minority acts and sentiments than they have ever said in the past 20 years.

                    • Cocoa from DC

                      Black people are attacked. By the police. In DC. Where Barack Obama currently resides. Yes, Trump has empowered racists in places where racism thrives. But what about here in the big city?

                • Guest

                  Sweetheart, you’re ahead of your time. This is a long, painful and arduous voting for the lesser proccess. Your passion is a great ideally, but not so much realistically. Your point of view is not wrong, but just that you’re ignoring a major factor that we as a black people, just do not have the empirical or monetary power to make the radical changes neccessary at this point. You’re ahead of your time.

            • mssporadic

              Refusing to participate in the system doesn’t prevent the system from enforcing its power on you. Lack of participation is what they want because they don’t care about your opinions anyway. If you really hate the system, then do something to dismantle it. Marc Lamont Hill actually commented as such on the Breakfast Club.

              Also, there are plenty of people here that don’t like Hillary.

              • DM.

                Marc Lamont Hill is way too smart to be hosting that shifty VH1 show
                Is life THAT hard for a brotha out in LA?

                • mssporadic

                  He likes ratchet just as much as the rest of us. I don’t watch it, but I see his snaps and IGsnaps enough to know that I’m not missing anything. I think he wants to blend entertainment and politics but haven’t convinced VH-1 yet.

            • cryssi

              So don’t vote?

        • DM.

          I don’t think the black community has “forgiven” Hillary and her husband as such. We’ve just decided (‘we’= basically me) that for now, Trump (plus his followers) are a bigger threat.
          We can always deal with Hillary (and the lousy Democrats) later.

        • Damon Young

          “I’m really saddened by this thread because, not to be rude, I was under the impression that this was a forum where critical thinking could thrive and we could be open and honest”

          Isn’t this entire thread an example of open and honest critical thinking?

    • Val

      Yeah, you definitely haven’t read my comments. Lol

    • Negro Libre

      I really don’t care about the Clintons but I also tend not to buy this whole idea that these politicians are going out of there way to oppress people of any sort. I just don’t think it shows any understanding of how Washington actually works or complexity in general, it reeks of the American bias towards conspiracy theories when dealing with complexity in politics. There’s a relatively obscure movie that came out almost 20 years ago, called The Distinguished Gentleman with Eddie Murphy, that pretty much blatantly shows the logic behind Washington and how policy is decided, which is why I’ve never felt, outside of “wedge issues”, very little changes based off who is president.

      The problem with having a governmental system, where interest groups (profit/ non-profit or disenfranchised vs privileged) can consistently lobby and rally for any form of legislation they like, as though the actual government itself has no restraint or limitations in terms of what it can and cannot do, is bound to be corrupted and enrich politicians (taking wealth, time and energy from more productive uses of resources in the local and state level), just as passing laws that are obscure and purposely gray and convoluted are going to enrich lawyers (which is why so many congressmen and congresswomen are all lawyers).

      To me the Clinton’s just remind me of the Nigerian politicians back home, just blatantly and shamelessly corrupt. The amount of people, this year, connected to the Clintons who have mysteriously died, is so laughable, that I almost want to give them a crown for being so blatant about how they get down.

      • Tambra

        Not a stan, but why is Assange still alive?

        • Val

          It would be too obvious who did it. They’ll wait until he’s no longer a high profile person. It may be 10 or even 20 or more years from now but they’ll get him.

          • Tambra

            Good point.

        • Negro Libre

          Assange has disgraced people, but I don’t think he’s seriously jeopardized foreign policy. I’ve also heard some sensible points that the intelligent agencies usually use him to disgrace their competitors (CIA vs NRA), so they can gain the advantage and get a bigger chunk of the budget.

      • I remember the Distinguished Gentleman as well. Saw it in the theater too. Between that, Death to Smoochy, Steve Martin’s Leap of Faith and the works of George Orwell, that’s pretty how I view government.

        • Negro Libre

          Distinguished Gentleman is so matter of fact, people kind of just miss it, because the story doesn’t really have a standout antagonist.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7fBwc803CI

        • Negro Libre

          Also, did you hear the story about about Apple, Ireland the E.U. and the U.S. Lol, it shows you how dysfunctional the entire global , political and economic issues of the world are driven by governments and corporations alike who just want to seize money for themselves. (Carol Quigley addresses this issue in Tragedy and Hope which more people should read, not because of conspiracy, but because it’s pretty clear he knows what the heck he is talking about.)

          • Hugh Akston

            i was going to post this but didn’t know under which article lol

            it’s goin to be interesting following this case 14b is a few bucks even for apple

      • DM.

        Remember when Bill met Loretta Lynch for almost an hour at the back of an airplane right before the FBI released their report on Hillary’s emails?
        The Clintons have no shame, it’s amazing actually.

      • Cocoa from DC

        Fam, I’m was a lobbyist in DC for 6 years. When politicians, lobbyist, and NGO elites get into rooms together, they are trying to oppress people. Its not much more complex than that. They have very clear understandings of the issues we face but when, I, as black woman would point out the hypocrisies before me (well I did at first, eventually you learn to be a good negro or quit. I quit) I was told, I didn’t understand. what they were really saying, you don’t understand how this system works, C. you wouldn’t have a job if it wasn’t for the oppression, C.

        How don’t I understand when I’m helping to write the policies?

        Comparing our political system to Nigeria is exactly why we should participate in it.

        • Negro Libre

          I’m simply saying the way it’s set up, it’s inevitable. I didn’t grow up in the American political system, but I did grow up in the Nigerian political system, and just like ours, corruption was inevitable, because there were no restraints on the laws that can be passed.

  • cryssi

    Sooo, how about those Pistons? Oh, it’s football season? My bad, that’s awkward.

    How I felt reading this just now, lol

    • ALM247

      Yep

    • mssporadic

      I’m a Detroit native that went to Michigan. An hour west of Detroit is Jackson, which is where I would expect Trump lovers to reside.

      An hour or so north of MI lands you at least 2 towns that black people should just drive past.

      • cryssi

        I’m a Spartan, I know where Jackson is…lol

        • mssporadic

          Sorry, the Jackson reference was more for PJ. I was co-signing your comment in general.

          • cryssi

            Lol, gotcha

      • I went to OU…. the Taco Bell in Chelsea is bomb af though..lol

      • Mochasister

        Sundown towns?

        • prolly. I ride (Harley) with DH and a buncho other Whyt folks and omg – they just do. not. under. STAND. when I am all ‘eh? NO!’ when they suggest we ride through, say, Southern IL or (gasp!) Southern IN. And STAY someplace. And/or stop for a late lunch.

      • Nik White

        Wixom?

        • mssporadic

          There too. Pretty much anywhere in a 1hr radius from Detroit would be Trump territory.

      • Lillie Emily

        Go Blue!

      • Brother Mouzone

        Jackson is where the Republican party was born and there are signs that indicate that on the roads.

    • Waddup doe! #westside

    • With all of these D boys and girls on the site, we need to have a meet up.

    • AshAlly08

      Go Green!

      I’m a Detroit native who has since moved to DC. Anywhere outside of the metro-Detroit area I would expect Trump signage. Heck… let me rephrase, cause I know there’s gotta be Trump signage in Warren. Anywhere outside of Detroit area, I would expect Trump signage.

      • cryssi

        Go white!

        Lol, so true…especially Warren, lmbo

  • kingpinenut

    Slawdamb son…..

    My mom is black and is sad that Ben Carson is out the race…

    We talk sometimes…

  • Brooklyn_Bruin

    And Michigan is a swing state?

    • mssporadic

      I don’t think so. Though our legislature is Republican, we still vote Blue in the presidential elections.

  • Soooo I was tryna read this and see it for your mother…but my mind wasn’t letting it happens…soooo I had to step away.

    • panamajackson

      Hey, that’s fair. I’m just as surprised. I have mostly stopped speaking politics with her. But she wouldn’t let it ride.

      • LOL let me LIVE mama!

      • mssporadic

        No shade to MamaPJ, but if she is getting most of her idiologies from your stepdad she needs to her your POV. Obviously you can’t change her mind but may be it will spark her to educate herself on American politics (and history) or at least turn off Fox News.

        • panamajackson

          We have lots of convos about lots of things. I don’t think my mother is that impressionable, she has her opinions. But like many married couples, i think opinions start to align.

      • alas, I know that one all too well. It’s hard to manage. Breathe, PJ. Just…breathe.

  • Courtney Wheeler

    http://gifsec.com/wp-content/uploads/GIF/2014/03/Hmmm-GIF.gif?gs=a
    That’s some stuff man. But I get into it with my friends all the time because I don’t hate Hilary Clinton one bit. To each its own ya know?

  • Lisa Necole

    Since we telling on them – My dad’s most recent words about Trump “We will have some fun, we will all tune in to watch him…Hillary is too rehearsed”. I don’t know if he is a true voter but I was SHAMED. All I can think is when Trump ships your black, Nigerian self back home … I will just send him a text while he is on the boat that says “It was funny while it lasted”.

    • Glo

      My cousin said something the other day about how “hilarious” Trump was, and I legit had to leave the room because I can’t have this convo with a loved one.

      • MsCee

        I’m sure people thought Hitler was hilarious until he started burning ma’ fluckas alive and sending hundreds of thousands more to gas chambers. Oh, genocide! Such a historical knee slapper.

      • Mochasister

        Ain’t a damn thing funny about that man.

  • Glo

    Here’s the thing: I don’t like Hillary, either. I don’t actively dislike her as much as so many people seem to, but I don’t like her. I think that she and her hubby (mostly her hubby, though) have done some things that have put the black community in a bad place.

    That. Being. Said: I’d much rather deal with Hillary and her systemic racism than Trump and his overt, violent (and also systemic) racism. He’s making racists feel empowered. I received super racist hate mail for the first time EVER in my life, and it was directly related to his candidacy. I can only imagine what type of h3ll hole we’ll be living in if he wins. I have no idea how people’s hatred for Hillary can blind them to what the reality of a Trump presidency would look like for black and brown people.

    Did we not learn from Brexit?

    • I’m realizing that people weren’t paying attention during the primaries. Like they didn’t quite comprehend that in our system, the Republican and Democratic nominees for president would have the best shot.

      At least the millenials aren’t really riding with either of them, as a third support third party candidates. I’d almost rather deal with Jill Stein

      • Sparger

        Jill Stein is moron.

        • Val

          And you say that because?

          • She’s a Harvard trained doctor who gives credit to anti-vaxxers. She’s a) part of the elite that millennials claim to hate and b) an idiot.

            https://hhharris.wordpress.com/2016/08/26/being-black-and-blue/

            • Val

              Really? Do you have receipts on the anti-vaxxer stuff?

              • https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2016/07/29/jill-stein-on-vaccines-people-have-real-questions/

                There are no questions on vaccines. Whether it comes from government or corporations, they are one of the most significant benefits of science toward human progress.

                • Val

                  She’s not an anti-vaxxer. She says she just thinks that anti-vaxxers don’t trust the process of getting approval for vaccines/ drugs. She said that she thinks vaccines are very important.

                  I asked because folks are always trying to say she’s an anti-vaxxer but when you ask for proof it’s never there.

                  • And I guess when it comes to something as proven as vaccines that it’s either all aboard or overboard. I have a bias.

                  • GenevaGirl

                    She is indeed not an anti-vaxxer, but she has not come out forcefully enough against them. Anti-vaxxers put other people’s lives at risk.

            • Chinasa

              So you don’t think its possible to be “part of the elite” and still recognize not only is the system flawed, but also take strides to change it (ie Green Party mission statement)?
              * honest question here*

              • I don’t know. In theory, you can be. I just find it odd that many people are railing against the elite but also choose candidates from elite backgrounds. I wish we had more candidates who came from public universities.

          • GenevaGirl

            She is a Harvard Med School professor and she’s placates anti-vaxxers. She needs to shut them down.

  • Remind your mama that Gary Johnson is still a thing. Just saying man. I’m not exactly rolling with Hillary either, but there are better options.

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