Drake’s VIEWS Is A Sadder, Colder, And Worse Version Of Every Drake Album » VSB

Featured, Music, Pop Culture

Drake’s VIEWS Is A Sadder, Colder, And Worse Version Of Every Drake Album

Has Drake fallen off? I’ve had a hunch that this was happening for a little over a year now, but the pop-culture whirlwind of Meek Mill and “Hotline Bling” threw me off the case. The truth was buried beneath a shower of memes and GIFs. Somehow, the stench of tepid-hotdog-water bars found their way into this detective’s nose.

With the release of Views, I was forced to revisit suspicions I’ve had since the simpler times of winter 2015. I drew my looking glass a bit closer and found three chinks in Drake’s armor: transparent calculation, wave riding, and lazy bars. The current state of the rap game had left these weak points uncovered and untested by competitors, but maybe VIEWS would assuage my concerns. Let me take you back to where it all started.

March 2015. Paris. A disappointingly terrible nightclub.

An unrepentant Kanye stan, I foolheartedly attend a Just Blaze set with a flash drive of struggle beats while on vacation, because, hey, you never know. Prior to Just Blaze’s arrival, someone made the decision that the entirety of If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late needed to be played to a room full of clubgoers.

It did not need to be played; it was not a good album. For a brief period, the pop-culture gods had deemed that “woe” was a thing. It was terrible. It was contrived—it may have been written by Quentin Miller—but people liked it and I couldn’t understand why. The entire project was filled with bread-loaf ends, outside of “Used 2,” “6PM in New York,” “6 Man” and “Jungle.” Fortunately, the karma of releasing a reach like “Madonna” quickly rebounded and Drake received an ashtray and plain Listerine kiss from Madonna herself.

The averageness of IYRTITL could be chalked up to the project being deemed a mixtape, but “Madonna” is an example of one of Drake’s consistent issues. Referencing other artists is fine, but his heavy-handedness results in poor execution. “Wu-Tang Forever,” “Practice” and the outro on “6 Man” were lowlights on his previous albums. On Views he commits the sin again with “U With Me?” He even had the nerve to name a track “Fire & Desire,” which included melodic vocals but had no “sangin’” on it.

May 2015. Los Angeles. A bar.

The happy hour crowd is preparing to watch the Atlanta Hawks get casually swept aside by the Cleveland Cavaliers for the first time. A cameraman catches LeBron James singing “My Way” by Fetty Wap. Fetty Wap was the hottest thing in 2015, so, of course, Drake remixed it. Drake also liked ILoveMakonnen“Tuesday” and remixed it. Drake also liked Migos’ “Versace” and remixed it.

There’s nothing wrong with an artist appreciating the work of up-and-comers, but Drake’s quickness to hang 10 on the latest wave is becoming less tolerable as his star grows. Recently, ILoveMakonnen commented on Drake’s lack of support during his time on the OVO Sound label before quickly backtracking. Even his latest collaboration with Future was driven heavily by Future’s sound.

VIEWS showcases Drake’s affinity for dancehall on “Too Good,” “Controlla,” “One Dance” and a few outros, including a shoutout from Beenie Man. While Toronto has a large Caribbean community, it’s never really been front and center in Drake’s work. Maybe, as de facto mayor, he’s trying to bring the entire “6” under his banner.

“Pop Style” Drake feat. Jay Z and Kanye West” appears on my news feed. I scour YouTube to find an official track and am treated to an audio diaper: “Got so many chains they call me ‘Chaining Tatum.’ (Editor’s note: An entire episode of True Hollywood Stories needs to be dedicated to deconstructing how bad that line is.) The spirit of Big Sean is moving. Also, the Jay Z feature was two bars. Which isn’t quite “Fuck y’all niggas,” but it’s clearly “I’m busy nuzzling my wife’s ankle.” The final album version includes neither Jay nor Ye.

Drake’s lyricism has always been solid, but his ever increasing focus on his flow, coupled with the specter of Quentin Miller, has introduced doubts. These doubts turned to legitimate concerns when I heard the final official track on the album, the titular “Views.” Typically, the last track on a rap album is reserved for barzzz, and these lines were obviously not peer reviewed: “My wifey is a spice like I’m David Beckham,” and “It’s like the front of the plane, nigga, it’s all business.

After wading through a sea of Lemonade to give VIEWS some quality time, I came to a realization: Too many years of celebrity have eroded Drake’s greatest attribute, his honesty. Attempts at crafting or sometimes following a particular sound leave even his best bars lost in a cloud of disingenuity.

Drake is a rapper, not a band; sound alone leaves his persona lost in a caricature of itself. VIEWS touches on “the come-up,” but it generally sidesteps Lil Wayne. It mentions his legacy but doesn’t really discuss who he’s inspiring or actually working with.

The album once again muses on relationships, but instead of the faux-wistful dismissiveness we’ve come to expect from manipulative player Drake, we get a cold cornball lothario. A man relegated to the truth of his ain’t-shit-ness. It’s eerie that more of the same would follow Nothing Was the Same. VIEWS is Soviet-era propaganda. Toronto in red. Compelling, thoughtful and masterful, while simultaneously cold and devoid of joy, like the 2016 Cleveland Cavaliers. Drake says it himself on “Hype”: “I don’t take shit for granted; I do my own propaganda.”

He didn’t fall off, but I think Aubrey has gone missing.

Brandon Harrison

Brandon lives in LA and has Hollywood stories that rival those of Rick James. He prides himself on staying righteous and knowing more about basketball than you.

  • Brass Tacks

    Nice deconstruction of Drakes current situation. I heard a couple songs off the album, but not enough to warrant any critique of the album.

    That being said: Does the specter of QM have any bearings on your ranking of Drake as a rapper, and by proxy, the overall album? Not as an Artist or Entertainer, but just bar for bar lyricism, if he was in your top 8 discussion before, is he still their now?

    • TheCollinB

      That’s a tough question. I wanna say he’s no longer in the mentions but I just gotta recall the bars he had on the SFG opener and I can’t write him off completely.
      Once you go pop you HAVE to get outside help. Nobody is capable of making consistent radio charting music by themselves forever. It’s just strange that he had someone write reference what would essentially be a street record. It would be the equivalent of having Bobby Flay trying to pass off Franklin’s BBQ as his own for a family dinner.
      Once you get too busy to write bars you simply have lost the juice (pause)

      • Brass Tacks

        That’s pretty much where my own thoughts align.

        Drake’s: Comeback season and So Far Gone tapes read as authentic.

    • Brandon Allen

      Nah, mostly becuase I know dudes have been sharing bars during studio time since forever. Especially, when it seemed like Quentin was really putting together hooks anyway.

  • JennyJazzhands

    Thanks to you, I will now be referring to people I don’t care for as “bread loaf ends” for the rest of the week at least.

    • OSHH

      If you make a toasted pbj wit em, they hittin’!!!

      • JennyJazzhands

        Toasted pb and j sounds awful. Toasted?!

        • Gbadebo

          All toasted evrrrythang

        • Sigma_Since 93

          Gotta try it.

        • Cheech

          All the time.

      • Kas

        With bacon, and I’m in.

        • TheCollinB

          *no look daps*

      • Accurate.

      • miss t-lee

        Or a grilled cheese? Listen…

      • Sigma_Since 93

        I’m Sigma_Since 93 and I approve this message.

  • Michelle

    Unpopular opinion: in my opinion, Drake is the hip hop version of Taylor Swift, when I think about the chose content in his songs. Now, if I would compare him to another rapper, I would LL… of course.

    • RewindingtonMaximus

      Good point on the Taylor comparison.

      But the LL one..only problem with that is LL was a certified wordsmith & overall great emcee before he became known for the ladies stuff. But I do see your point.

      • miss t-lee

        I was going to type that about LL, but you beat me to it,

        • RewindingtonMaximus

          Great minds think alike.

          • miss t-lee

            Well…you can’t front on what LL was.

            • RewindingtonMaximus

              People do all the time…and then I gotta play a song like Rampage to remind him who that man really is.

              • miss t-lee

                Or Jack The Ripper

      • LL had a bit more consistency on the albums though. Even through the chick rap, he had 3 or 4 certified BANGERS on every album.

        • RewindingtonMaximus

          Which is why he is a GOAT, because no matter what anyone says, he destroyed tracks.

    • Val

      “Drake is the hip hop version of Taylor Swift, …”

      So you’re saying Drake is phony?

    • I think the difference is Drake is self manufactured, he literally knows the cheat code and will hit it every time

  • miss t-lee

    Ever since Comeback Season and So Far Gone it’s been a downhill slide for ya boy.
    Those two albums/mixtapes I could listen to all the way through. Almost everything he’s dropped since then? I like maybe 3 to 4 songs on an album. Haven’t even tried to listen to Views yet, because I figure it will be more of the same.

    • Brandon Allen

      Take Care is a great album and NWTS has some of his best singles. Honestly a ten track album of his guest verses would be pretty good. His one offs and features are great.

      • miss t-lee

        As I mentioned I like a few songs here and there on both. His features are definitely where he’s shining.

        • Brandon Allen

          A few songs here or there couldve just been the singles. I’m caping for Take Care but like 80% of of that one one is good.

          • miss t-lee

            You can cape for Take Care all you want. I’m still only listening to “Lord Knows”.
            Although listening to the screwed and chopped version of the album made it interesting.

            • Brandon Allen

              No HYFR? Or The Motto?

              • miss t-lee

                They’re aight.

      • TheCollinB

        http://youtu.be/YIluOj-yoeI

        Prolly my favorite Aubrey feature.

        • miss t-lee

          Yup. This one is a fave. Although he added nothing to the song…lol

      • Major understatement. That tells you dude is trash in selecting producers. His guest verses are fire, but that’s because he isn’t picking the beats. Who is his A&R rep and why are they still employed?

        • Brandon Allen

          I think he has great production. He’s not Nas. But he needs to give 40 and these Super Mario underwater beats a rest. Maybe he can work with Swizz. Can’t be melancholy over those referee whistles.

        • Hes staunchly loyal to 40 who is seemingly out of tricks

    • GirlMelanie86

      This is basically me. LOVED his mixtapes, I liked Take Care, and some of NWTS but that’s it.

      • miss t-lee

        *daps*

  • Val

    Question for the room. I’m don’t really listen to Drake other than when I hear a song of his on the radio. And every time I hear him, whether he’s rapping on singing, his voice is autotuned. So, my question is; does Drake ever rap or sing without autotune? And, is his voice as nasally as it seems with autotune?

    • miss t-lee

      Yes, and yes.

    • TheCollinB

      There was a pretty good article at gawker a while back about the woman that was his vocal coach. Long story less long she said he has a thin sound to his voice that they’ve worked to make fuller. He makes use of the octaves in his records and more often than not he tries to pitch his verses to match the octave.

      • Val

        Interesting. The rap that I like the most is classic rap from the 80s and 90s. Which means most of the rappers had what I would describe as resonant voices. Even the women rappers of those eras had resonant voices.

        So I’m kind of lost and dumfounded by rappers like Wayne and Drake who honestly sound more like cartoon characters than rappers. No shade.

        • Kas

          No disrespect, but I’m about to scorch the earth. Go on Val. :)

        • TheCollinB

          not shade. just what you wanna hear. there are some new gen rappers that use melody that still go in. did you like Ye’s song “Ultra Light Beam” cause the kid Chance the rapper set that record on fire with serious bars and he’s extremely melodic with his bars.

          • Val

            Nope, but I’ll check him out. Thanks.

        • Listen to Chance the Rapper.

        • Brandon Allen

          I mean that resonant tone was more of an affectation than anything and equally cartoonish. Wayne is performance art. Drake is just nasal.

          • Val

            How is it an affectation? Your voice is your voice.

            • Brandon Allen

              There’s a certain clarity and tone to a lot of that period of rap especially on the east coast that’s a bit stylized. Cuz thats how rap was. But yes your voice is your voice.

        • Baemie St. Patrick

          Your first paragraph is why I love the rapper Young Dolph. Run on the mill trap rapper talmbout nothing with catchy beats and hooks but his voice is so deep and FULL. He sounds like a grown man.

          • RewindingtonMaximus

            Uh huuuuuuuuuuuuh

            • Baemie St. Patrick

              WHET?!

              • RewindingtonMaximus

                I tried to do that Young Dolph ad-lib he always does but it looks retarded in font.

                • Baemie St. Patrick

                  LMAO!!

        • Janelle Doe

          Thanks for explaining my recent rapper issues. I like resonant voices too.
          Curious if you ever see either Drake or Wayne on a track like glory. Would they be believable?

      • NonyaB

        Whoa. So, the voice as-is is the “fuller” version? Ugh. Already can’t stand it, so, can’t imagine it’s actually even worse.

    • No one sings without autotune aside from jazz singers.

      • Val

        I do not believe this is true. Receipts?

      • TheCollinB

        I can’t agree with this. It’s been used as a correctional tool for a while but it’s not a “no one” situation. Jazmine Sullivan aint tuning

        • HouseOfBonnets

          Sho nuff ain’t (Pops in reality show)

          • L8Comer

            Ahhh now I need to listen to it too

        • Every modern singer in popular music uses it. I swear to you. It’s to vastly different degrees.

  • One of the better non-Panama music posts here

  • Julian Green

    “…Drake’s quickness to hang 10 on the latest wave is becoming less tolerable as his star grows.”

    Drake, the Finesse God.

    • These artists keep getting Ace Hooded too…..dawg just say no

      • Baemie St. Patrick

        Music career notwithstanding, Hoodie willing right now. His lady? *bites fist* Ace is about to make yoga cool for hip hop the way Uncle Russy couldn’t lol

  • Album should’ve been named “Feels from the 6” (and subsequently, just “Feels”) Dude seemed like he was entirely enveloped by his own emotions throughout 97% of the album.

  • God Shammgod

    The album was more bloated that my waistline during my monthly lady time.

    I’m completely over Drake. World Music Drake, Trust Issues Drake, Beta Male Misogynist Drake, Road Man Drake, need to go away. I miss when he pretended to be from Houston.

    Everything about this album irritated me. People keep waiting for Drake to reach his “potential” but we’re what 5 albums in now? This is who Drake wants to be. And he ain’t growing. He’s gonna continue to have his team write him verses that are the manifestation of instagram caption subtweets to his exes and act like it’s not sad as sh*t that he hasn’t opened google.com to find out what the definition of introspection means – all while bandwagoning on every sound that bubbling up to the forefront.

    With his bodega store owner looking azz. Ugh.

    And he took Popcaan off Controlla. I can’t. If you’re gonna be fugazi and pretend to be into diasporic music at least give me what I want to hear – who wants to hear Aubrey Graham attempt patois? Not you, not me, not the bodega cat he left behind at his shop.

    I’m annoyed all over again.

    • Val

      Wow, Drake’s stock has dropped in record time. I remember a post a few months ago here and folks were debating whether he could already be considered a rap legend. I said it was much too soon but others were disagreeing with me. Interesting.

      • Julian Green

        I’m no Drake fan, but I’d find it hard to argue that he isn’t a hip-hop legend at this point. For better or for worse, he has done things stylistically that have forever altered the genre.

        • Val

          Yeah, well, this has been debated. I don’t agree but I’m not a hip hop expert either, so.

        • Drake is a Thing, for better or worse. He just needs different producers to push him out of the ruts he gets stuck in.

        • God Shammgod

          I don’t know how he altered the genre when all of his stylistic choices were derivatives of other people that were already doing it. I think he will arguably define a moment though. The BrysonWeekendNextDoor doesnt exist if he doesnt blow.

          • I’m not mad. Considering that ten years ago, we were looking at Snap Music taking over hip hop, I’ll live. Plus The Weeknd is actually interesting, even if he’s a studio baby.

            • The right people got in his ear

            • Conrad Bess

              Disagree. Went to his show in Toronto. Dude can sing. That falsetto is legit. Thought it was autotune too.

            • Baemie St. Patrick

              Easy Listening Weeknd is basura. House of Balloons and Thursday Weeknd….

              *sigh* She want that old thing back.

          • Julian Green

            Oh, Drake is derivative as fuck but as the guy that brought that particular schtick to the mainstream, he gets the credit for altering popular music. There are enough people in his mold that you could legitimately have a Post-Drake subgenre.

            • Brandon Allen

              The 808s & Heartbreak tree.

              • As much as I can’t stand that album, you can’t say it wasn’t influential.

                • Indeed.

                  It was the birthplace of “Urban Emo.”

            • RewindingtonMaximus

              That can be said for a couple of artists in each genre of music during each generation. They just bring a special flair together and make it their own, despite the elements already existing, just separated.

              He made it popular to not be macho but not be a hippie at the same time. The problem is there were a bunch of rappers all doing the same thing…BUT DRAKE SINGS…and that’s the kicker..because supposedly the ladies lover a crooner.

              His problem was always mediocre singing, mediocre rapping. He turned that into decent singing, and decent rapping. And then he regressed.

            • Mwatuangi

              As Jay said in “Takeover”: “You made it a hot line/ I made it a hot song.” I think he’s pretty much crafted the whole angsty emo forever scorned by bad relationships rapper into an artform. ‘Ye definitely set the bar with 808 and Heartbreaks for this generation though.

        • terrahawk

          You mean Kanye hs done things stylistically that have forever changed the genre

          • Julian Green

            Both of them have changed the game and both of them are not nearly as good as they think they are.

      • God Shammgod

        Never been that much of a fan – too much passive aggresive whining. I only like rappity rappity Drake and he rarely feels inclined to do that so here we are. Dreams Money Can Buy was in 2013, and he didn’t give it to me as a single or try to duplicate that effort since.

        If he insists on whining he at least should do it over a flames beat. Let Just Blaze give him another “Lord Knows” – besides that I’m out.

        • Val

          As I said in my main comment, I’ve never been able to get past his voice. So the whole Drake popularity elludes me.

          • OSHH

            It alludes me as well and has from the beginning but I just chalked up to a generational thing cause I never could with dude and not because he wasn’t street, that whining and fake woe is me, I’m so in tuned to my feelings but I’m still doggin brawds was always wack to me.
            http://stream1.gifsoup.com/view1/3402341/sensitive-o.gif

            • miss t-lee

              This gif is so golden.

            • Brandon Allen

              He’s a good rapper, had clever wordplay, makes good music. His popularity is valid but he didn’t do anything with it. Stagnant.

              • DBoySlim

                But is it his wordplay?

                • OSHH

                  See.

              • BaltimoreJack

                Did he retire? This comment suggests that. What’d I miss? Amazes me when you “critics” state your opinions as facts. Newsflash: there’s a huge segment out there who think Drake is great, who think Views is great, and go on with their lives. This thread is Drake Haters Anonymous or something lol. People are really in their feelings on here. Wanna know something above art? If it gets you to feel something, anything, then it’s done its job. Indifference is the enemy of any artist. Reading these comments as well as this blog, I can tell you that Drake already won. Peace.

                • Brandon Allen

                  This comment does not suggest that. I’m entitled to my opinion. Drake is great and I expect great things from him. Views is safe and I’m not the only person who feels that way.

                • NonyaB

                  Newsflash: Just as there’s a huge segment out there who like Drake, there’s an equally substantial segment who aren’t here for him. Both segments coexist; not a new phenomenon. *Yawn* Please exit left.

            • Mwatuangi

              Why can I totally imagine Drake sobbing while singing in auto-tune the “I’LL GET IN YOUR PANTS!” line from that movie?

            • cakes_and_pies

              This gif is so bland, I need dislodge the fresh piece of white bread stuck on the roof off my mouth.Jut the gif, not you

          • Kas

            .

          • Nik White

            It’s because he’s easy on the eyes (not my type – I’m just sayin) and has had some decent beats.

          • NonyaB

            LOL, just said as much in my comment. You’re not the only one! Never got the hype.

        • miss t-lee

          “too much passive aggresive whining”

          See…that’s what I can’t stand.

          • I’ve discussed my feelings about Aubrey at length…smh. #breakfastblendcoffeerap

            • miss t-lee

              LOL I know Wu…you an’t stand ol’ boy.

        • Brass Tacks

          “Closer to My Dreams” and “Dreams Money Can Buy”, are definitely standout Drake.

          I think he like most rappers are better when they have yet to achieve the success they crave.

          Thus the Dream titles serving as a springboard/ extension for expression of hopes and aspirations. I.e most great rap evar.

        • “Never been that much of a fan – too much passive aggressive whining.”

          Not excusing his horrible attempts at singing but the passive aggressive whining and fake nice guy act is what kills me about Aubrey. I can’t listen to a rapper who I want to push down a flight of stairs.

          That and the fact that he was exposed to having a ghost writer and it somehow wasn’t a big deal to his folks.

          • Oluseyi

            Only hip hop heads care about who wrote the lyrics. There is no other genre where a performer can be so castigated for not having penned wholly original lines—remember when people argued that Jay-Z lifted too many lines from B.I.G.?

            The rest of the world give no f*cks. Does it bang? Well, OK then.

            • Hammster

              I’m late but I must say I think most would be at least somewhat or highly disappointed if they found out that Langston Huges or Maya Angelou had ghost writers.

              • Oluseyi

                Poetry (largely) isn’t a performance art. Neither is literature. The argument is that artforms that are as much performative as authorial by and large do not disparage noted performers for performing work written by others.

                The idea you’re advancing here is that rap is fundamentally more similar to poetry or literature, but it isn’t. We don’t purchase transcriptions or rhyme books; we buy/download/stream records. Even a capella in a cypher, it’s about the performance—diction, enunciation, breath control, tempo, deliberate contortion to fit a rhyme scheme, etc.

                Plus, arguably, recent years have seen a deprioritization of lyrics as more emotionally expressive, less dense styles have risen to the forefront, from the sparseness of much snap to staccato/broken simile style (in which words are uttered on bar breaks, without connecting prepositions, conjunctions, adjectives or comparatives). Not surprisingly, self-important hip hop heads despise these trends, too.

                In conclusion, don’t nobody care.

                • lissa_the_cocoa

                  I disagree. I think hip hop is both authority and performative. It started as a movement to express the pain and hard lives of black men in urban areas, and part of the schtick has always been appreciating innovative bars and rhyme schemes. I don’t care if Bey sings someone else’s shiz but Jay? Nas? Drake? I expect them to write their own shiz.

                  • Oluseyi

                    This interpretation delegitimizes collaborative expression and forces contributors into the “ghost writer” ghetto, while also turning the term into a slur. Further, it insists on viewing all hip hop today through a narrow facet of the genre’s origins. Sure, pain and hard lives were foundational to the birth of hip hop, but the birthing theater was the block party, with emcees following the traditions of the Jamaican dancehall toasters.

                    For a genre that is itself so malleable, endlessly hybridizing with and ultimately absorbing everything it touches, this origin fixation is a curious irony.

                    In any case, your not caring about other genres but insisting that rappers write their own stuff marks you as a “head.” And, tough as it may be to hear, the hip hop head is a dying breed. These kids ain’t loyal.

          • NonyaB

            “can’t listen to a rapper who I want to push down a flight of stairs” = My sentiments exactly.

        • CheGueverraWitBlingOn

          Whenever anyone asks me about my feelings towards Drake, I’m just gonna quote you. Spot on.

        • BaltimoreJack

          His stock has dropped? By whose account? Random internet commenters? He’s as popular as he’s ever been.

      • Brooklyn_Bruin

        KRS hasn’t dropped a good album since the mid 90’s. No one is denying him legendary status after twenty years of bricks. 20!

        • Val

          Interesting that you mention Mr Parker considering his recent crazy statements.

          • miss t-lee

            Exactly. I’m looking at him so sideways these days.

            • OSHH

              Like for real, dude.

              • miss t-lee

                So, so trash.

          • Brooklyn_Bruin

            I see them as growing pains.
            Hip hop no longer belongs to a set of elite kids from the Bronx. But no one wants to really see that is become this multi billion dollar monstrosity that has to answer to society at large.

            One of them boys from PM Dawn was out there molesting, and I’m willing to bet that Kris said something about them. (They had beef)

            • The story about BDP bum rushing PM Dawn off the stage will never NOT be hilarious. LOL And PM Dawn were pioneers of the rap singing ish.

        • Brass Tacks

          KRS had the late 80’s in his palms though. Considering the era 86-87? The Bridge is Over and the likes. I would say his relevance relative to the pop-ish nature of hip-hop now was greater.

          Something akin to lyrical inflation?

          • Brooklyn_Bruin

            Hip hop was way smaller. But KRS could still rock a crowd that doesn’t know his material. The old guys were more like that funny loudmouth at a party rather than the rock stars and moguls they portray themselves as.

            But him and the guys of the Yo MTV raps era took hip hop from a curiosity to a global phenomena. For a while they defined the outlines of what rap is.

            But once the sweet potato pie was out of the oven..

        • Cleojonz

          Uggh. KRS was my 2nd favorite rapper of all time after Chuck D. If he dropped anything now I wouldn’t care because he came out of his mouth so foul about this Afrika Bambaata situation. So disappointing.

          • Kas

            So effing disappointing!!!

      • L8Comer

        Yup, I remember that

      • KingsCounty

        In a weird way, this post, it’s comments, the discussion in media, it sort of makes him on that legend path. I’m reading comments where ppl say they planned to devote their whole weekend to listening to Views. Like what? Really? It’s just an album why would I devote a weekend to it?
        The arguments im reading are basically the same arguments I’ve heard about JayZ growing up. Why he do this why did he do that, he’s not deep enough he’s not personal enough, he not helping this artist or that artist, he’s riding this wave he’s riding that wave. It’s annoying and making me feel old cuz now I’m seeing thru generations this is what the most popular artist gets.
        This album like all drake albums have some dope cuts and that’s about it.

    • AnswerMe

      So much whining and all of it done in an annoying azz monotone voice. UGH

    • Brandon Allen

      The funniest thing about this album is his new thing is “I’m pretending to be sad again but this time I’m openly admitting I’m lying”. The other thing that kills me is he talks about OVO and Toronto so.much and has not put one rapper on. Where is his Spliff star where is his bleek?

      • Julian Green

        “The other thing that kills me is he talks about OVO and Toronto so.much and has not put one rapper on. Where is his Spliff star where is his bleek?”

        To quote DJ Akademiks, “they’re working overtime in the OVO sweatshop”.

        • DBoySlim

          No one wants a Bleek

        • And people thought 50 was grimy with the G-unit gang!

          • Melissa

            Even poor Joe didn’t survive that mess.

      • God Shammgod

        if all of a sudden he cares about repping Toronto and its Caribbean/African influences, then why did he snuff out Kardinal Offishall’s career on his way to being the #1 rapper from the 6?

        Drake absorbs people to his camp to build his brand not theirs. Any Drake affiliate artist that has found success did so after leaving.

        • Word on Kardinal Official. Dude is a GOD in the T Dot, and rightfully so. Why did he dead his ish?

        • miss t-lee

          “Drake absorbs people to his camp to build his brand not theirs. Any Drake affiliate artist that has found success did so after leaving”.

          Yup. Pretty much why dvsn can’t get any pub, even though the album goes hard.

          • Brandon Allen

            I didn’t even know who dvsn was.

            • miss t-lee

              Catch up.

            • SororSalsa

              I just discovered dvsn thanks to The Read. I was expecting more based on the review, but it was decent.

          • I don’t think that’s accurate about dvsn. This is his first project and it’s reaching pretty far for somebody who practically came out of nowhere. Myself and most people didn’t know about him before his OVO affiliation. I agree tho the album goes in.

            • miss t-lee

              I’m just saying. It wasn’t really marketed, and the singles that dropped were the best thing on the album.

          • Eh, over it.

            • miss t-lee

              Ha!
              Over Drake, OVO, or dvsn?

              • Too single to give it any more spins I reckon

                • miss t-lee

                  LMAO

        • Ish

          I respectfully disagree with your initial comment and this review since I do like Views. But, you make a valid point about Drake not using his platform to showcase other Toronto rappers—there is SO much talent in that city so, why not include some unknowns on a few features? This would be the ultimate homage to the city he loves so much.
          Also, I’m glad you brought up Kardinal Offishall. Drake is too often touted as being the first rapper to celebrate Toronto but that is not the case at all. When I think of KO, I immediately think Toronto.

          • WESTPHILLY QUICK

            Which is it, does Drake “wave ride” by jumping on new artists tracks like Makonen and Migos or is he not showcasing other rappers talents. I get that you’re referring to TO specifically but if we’re being honest all of those guys with exception to Fetty got their mainstream buzzes off of Drake deciding to remix they’re songs.

          • Sandraganderson1

            “my room mate Lori Is getting paid on the internet 98$/hr”…..!cc398atwo days ago grey MacLaren P1 I bought after earning 18,512 DoIIars..it was my previous month’s payout..just a little over.17k DoIIars Last month..3-5 hours job a day…with weekly payouts..it’s realy the simplest. job I have ever Do.. I Joined This 7 months. ago. and now making over. hourly 87 DoIIars…Learn. More right Here !cc398a:?:?:???? http://GlobalSuperJobsReportsEmploymentsOnlyGetPayHourly$98…. .??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??:??::::::!cc398a….,….

        • Conrad Bess

          Kardinal is doing his thing, it’s just that Drake is Drake. Bakardi Slang, Ol Time Killin’ still go hard and it’s been 15 years.

          • Scoob

            Old Time Killin was my ish

            • Conrad Bess

              And the fact he got Busta to jump on the remix during a time Canadians weren’t being checked (although I think it has to do with the Jamrock heritage more than anything else).

      • The whole album was supposed to be an ode to his city and all they got was street name drops at best….imagine Hov making an album about New York and talks about himself for 20 tracks

      • Other_guy13

        But I thought he put The Weeknd and Partynextdoor on…or was that Ilovemelonsnish(I-Love-Melons-n-Ish …I refuse to say his name…like Beetlejuice he may pop up with more bad music if we say his name too much). Besides its hard to put people on when you with Ca$hMoney. We see what happened to Lil Wayne…Weezy lost money, Tyga had to get a Kardashian until his checks came in the mail(they still aint came) and I think Lloyd is dead(not really but you et my point).

    • I couldn’t believe he took Popcorn off of Controlla, Jamaica is crazy about Drake, and he gave Jamaicans the middle finger.

      • Brass Tacks

        Drake has been doing this for a while now. People haven’t been paying attention or not listening to the gripes (because microwave music is the wave), but he’s been siphoning the swag of up and coming artists for a minute now.

        Has kept him relevant way past usual expiration date.

      • Conrad Bess

        He didn’t. What was released/leaked was the “remix”, which was supposed to come out Caribana time alongside OVOfest.

    • cakes_and_pies

      My last ex wanted to be Drake so bad. The ex is gone, but Drake gets on my everlasting nerve. Bih, grow the eff up.

    • NonyaB

      I’ve never understood the hype about that boy. He’s like a wet blanket,
      especially with that voice and nauseating emo persona. That voice makes my black box wanna retreat and put up a “permanently on sabbatical” sign. Needless to say, not here for music and new muscles notwithstanding, not here for his looks either.

  • J Adisa

    I’m not a Drake fan – I like “Energy” and that’s about it, but the beats on VIEWS are monstrous. Exactly what I like and want.

    I’m looking forward to ‘discovering’ the instrumental album in the very near future.

More Like This