You don't believe you, you need more people.

In a week where we 1) saw approximately 126,000 different moderately famous men all decide to come out of the closet on the exact same day, 2) watched the Terminator get kicked out of the Kennedys for doing what Kennedys do, and 3) came thisclose to experiencing the first act of “Left Behind” (and by “thisclose” I mean “not f*cking close at all“), the reaction to Satoshi Kanazawa’s “Why Are Black Women Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women” still remained the most interesting story.

Seriously, in the three years that VSB has been around, I can honestly say that I’ve never seen a non-“important news” related meme catch fire and spread on the internet the way it did. Between Twitter, Facebook, news articles, blogs, and a particularly inspired (and particularly humorous) bout of scientific ownage, Kanazawa’s “study” was discussed, critiqued, examined, and denounced from every conceivable angle as we — content producers — practically tripped over ourselves in a mad dash to somehow get invited to this orgy of easy outrage and (easier) page views.

Although the tone of the preceding paragraph may have implied that I was disappointed with all the attention this story received, I actually was pleasantly surprised by the power and reach of our collective voice. I’m sure Kanazawa himself was surprised as well (although I’m assuming his surprise wasn’t as pleasant) when seeing that the reaction to his article might cost him his job at the London School of Economics — a direct effect of a few grassroots efforts to mobilize and protest.

While getting a quack scientist fired isn’t really that big of a deal, the insanely quick turnaround proves that we can get sh*t done if we put our creative resources together.

You know what would be even more impressive?

Find out exactly how this…

African-American women consistently rate themselves (collectively and individually) more attractive than any other culture of women on the planet. Every objective measure of self-image in comparison to non-black women reflects this.

…and this…

African-American women spend more per person on hair and beauty products — products where the main purpose of many of them is to make black women look “less black”¹ — than any other culture of women on the planet.

…can both be true.

¹”Less black” may have been a poor choice of words. Still, without turning it into a semantics argument, I think the point I’m trying to convey is pretty apparent.

—The Champ

No rapture means that God wants you to stay on Earth and purchase the paperback or the $9.99 Kindle version of “Your Degrees Wont Keep You Warm at Night: The Very Smart Brothas Guide to Dating, Mating, and Fighting Crime”

We’d like to thank all of you for coming through and nominating us for FIVE Black Weblog Awards. We’re on the final ballot for Best Humor Blog, Best Writing in a Blog, Best Sex & Relationships Blog, Best Group Blog, and Blog of the Year. Please vote for us here.


Damon Young

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB. He is also a contributing editor for EBONY.com. He resides in Pittsburgh, and he really likes pancakes.

Previously

The Rapture

  • Masiotso

    “where the main purpose of many of them is to make black women look less black”

    What is less black?

  • IsOurChildrenLearning?

    These products aren’t used to make us “less black” IMO. Black women just have more complicated hair needs, straight up. Black women often use weaves and relaxers as ways to make styling easier. Straight hair doesn’t make you look less black. It makes you look like a black girl who has straightened her hair. People drive me crazy with this foolishness. Why is it that when people tan others don’t say they are trying to look “more black”? If a curly haired jewish curl blow dries her hair straight is she trying to look “less jewish”?

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5FR1LGsT7E TheAnti-Cool

    Oh sh*t…

  • naturalista88

    Let the games begin!!

  • http://thejahfiles.blogspot.com/ B. Brown

    I suppose the easy (but incorrect) answer is that the second phrase causes the first to be true.

    Further playing advocate, it could be possible that sisters – note, no VS – think that other women’s desirable features to their own makes them “superwomen” of sorts. Lil’ Mo. F-a-b-o. Duh-duh-duh-duh, duh-duh-duh-duh….y’all get it.

    The real answer, though, really can’t be attained without looking further into the statements themselves. One would especially have to take a look at the different subgroups of sisters – after all, sisters are not a monolithic people – and compare thought processes across groups. There may be subgroups that rate themselves so highly that they pull the averages up. Could be groups that buy so much stuff that they pull those averages up.

    Long story short, there are more questions that need to be asked before we can come up with a complete answer.

  • Andi

    I’m still not sure about the validity of this statement:

    “African-American women spend more per person on hair and beauty products — products where the main purpose of many of them is to make black women look less black — than any other culture of women on the planet.”

    Has he been to India?? Those broads have the skin bleach game on lock.

    Plus, besides straightening our hair (something that seems less and less en vogue (no hold on)) I don’t see many other products or services out there to whitetify Black woman. No sista is trying to get lipo suction out of her butt or get a nose job (besides Nene… and Latoya).

    And with this, “the insanely quick turnaround proves that we can get sh*t done if we put our creative resources together.” <- I really think we tend to holler and mobilize over the wrong things. A quack scientist puts out a junk study, call Jesse. Our family structure is disintegrating, *crickets*.

  • http://thatswhatgemsaid.wordpress.com Gem Jones

    While getting a quack scientist fired isn’t really that big of a deal, the insanely quick turnaround proves that we can get sh*t done if we put our creative resources together.

    if we could rally this same collective outrage for something like govt budget cuts to education and increases to prison spending, we’d really make a damn difference in this world….

  • http://ThinkPrettySmart.typepad.com Ms. Smart

    Allow me to quote myself:

    “Honestly, I think a lot of this stems from keeping us in our place. We haven’t fallen for the ‘fear of fat’ white women have fallen for. We really haven’t even fallen for the ‘you’ll die alone unmarried’ hype completely. So what’s left? Even in the piece of article it was noted that we think highly of our own selves. External forced don’t get why their assaults aren’t lowering our perception of self! ”

    They’re just throwing pasta at the wall that is our self-esteem and hoping one of the insults sticks and knows us down a peg.

  • Anechoic

    Ladies. You are all beautiful. If the XY’s from other races can’t see, too bad, more for us.

  • Kamala Jones

    Some Black women REFUSE to fess up and admit that hair perming and weaves are rooted in self-hatred. They just won’t do it. But, how is it not self-hatred when Black women are allegedly spending half a trillion dollars on hair care and weaves while most Black folks really don’t have a pot to piss in and a window to throw it out of? (source http://atlantapost.com/2011/05/11/what-spending-a-half-a-trillion-dollars-on-hair-care-and-weaves-says-about-us/)

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