Podcast, Pop Culture, Race & Politics

Why Ashley Judd Was 100% Right…And 100% Wrong

They're raping everyone out here

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock or one of Big Baby Davis’s boobs, you’ve undoubtedly been made aware of the negative comments Ashley Judd made about hip-hop in her upcoming memoir, “All That Is Bitter And Sweet

“Along with other performers, YouthAIDS was supported by rap and hip-hop artists like Snoop Dogg and P. Diddy to spread the message…um, who? Those names were a red flag.

As far as I’m concerned, most rap and hip-hop music — with it’s rape culture and insanely abusive lyrics and depictions of girls and women as ‘ho’s’ — is the contemporary soundtrack of misogyny.”

Predictably, these remarks set off an internet firestorm. There were reluctantly pro Ashley articles, pro-Ashley articles, Ashley for president articles, reluctantly anti Ashley articles, anti-Ashley articles, all white b*tches must die articles, and all black n*ggers must be castrated articles. As of 11:05pm EST Wednesday night, googling “ashley judd hip-hop” returned 3,620,000 results.

It’s been a little over a week since these comments were made public. In the time since, after apparently receiving death threats from everyone from Diggy Simmons to Andrew Bynum, Ashley has “clarified,” stating (from her interview with Russell Simmons on Global Grind):

…My intention was to take a stand to say the elements that are misogynistic and treat girls and women in a hyper-sexualized way are inappropriate. The male dominance that is displayed, and the reinforcement of girls’ and women value and identify as primarily sexual, is not helpful in any artistic expression, in any cultural form, whether its country music or in television story lines.”

She even gives a shout-out to hip-hop’s richest and most notable nihilist.

“As for the artists themselves who I mention, I write about being friendly with and enjoying Curtis Jackson’s company, then being confused when on stage his .50 personae comes out.”

(I just have to say that I’m absolutely tickled that she referred to Fiddy as .50.)

As far as whether Judd’s initial comments — particularly the “rape-culture” remark — hold water, let me share something with you.

I originally was going to title this “25 Reasons Why Ashley Judd Was Right,” and, instead of creating my own reasons, I planned to just take “rape-sympathetic” lyrics from 25 different songs made by uber-popular artists in the last two or three years and list those instead. Each genre of rap — from the South and the mixtapes to the “conscious” and the club — would have been included.

Yes, rap is much, much more than running trains, putting p*ssies in sarcophaguses, and bruising esophaguses, but no with a working brain and even one working ear can deny that hip-hop is EXTREMELY misogynistic. You can argue and debate exactly why it’s so women-hating, but you just cannot ignore the fact that it is, it has been for (at least) 20 years, and it’s getting worse.

With that being said…

I haven’t read Faith Evans’ “Keep the Faith: A Memoir.” I also haven’t read Janet Jackson’s “True You: A Journey to Finding and Loving Yourself.” And, although the cover looks nice, I’ll probably never read Victoria Rowell’s “Secrets of a Soap Opera Diva.”

But, although I’ve never read any of those books, I’m 100% certain that none of them contain any disparaging remarks about country music, grunge, metal or any other genre of music where popular artists have been accused of being misogynistic. While every person obviously has a right to speak up about injustices, I’m not so certain that hip-hop needs a country music scion to police it.

Yes, these statements were published in her memoirs, and (good) memoirs are basically published diaries — completely naked accounts of your life and your thoughts –but that’s actually my point: Why did she even feel the need to go there? I mean, when I eventually write my memoirs — “The Passion of The Deez” coming in July of 2031 — you can be certain that I’m not going to devote an entire paragraph to my feelings about Billy Ray Cyrus or Johnny Cash or Boris Yeltzen or anyone or anything else I really have no business writing about.

This isn’t a race thing either. If a white person with a bit more of a relationship to hip-hop or even a pop culture critic like a Chuck Klosterman made these remarks, fine. But, an actress whose two most notable claims to fame are A) coming out of Naomi Judd’s vagina and B) rooting for a college basketball team?¹ Miss me with that.

Anyway, people of VSB.com, what you do think about Judd’s statements? Do you think she had a valid point? And, even if you think she might have a point, how do you feel about someone like her publicly expressing it?

The carpet is yours.

¹To her credit, Judd does have a very extensive and very laudable history of women’s rights advocacy. I was told about this after I posted the entry, and this knowledge has softened my stance quite a bit. Still, I prefer my hip-hop critics to have a bit more of a connection to hip-hop culture, though

—The Champ

If you haven’t purchased the paperback or the $9.99 Kindle version of “Your Degrees Wont Keep You Warm at Night: The Very Smart Brothas Guide to Dating, Mating, and Fighting Crime” yet, what the hell is stopping you?

Filed Under:

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Damon Young

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB. He is also a contributing editor for EBONY.com. He resides in Pittsburgh, and he really likes pancakes.

  • Starita34

    SECOND Yup, that’s how I-I-I-I do ;-)

    • Femster

      Dammit I moonwalked for absolutely nothing. -_-

      • Starita34

        No such thing as an unnecessary moonwalk…nice flair with the crotch grab. ;-)

        • DQ

          But there is such thing as an unnecessary crotch grab. I’m just saying in 2011… let the crotch grab stand for something (like a happy ending or maybe even a happy ending)

          #notypio

    • http://twitter.com/SmartFoxGirl SmartFoxGirl

      You know, Cheekie and I used to run this whole “FIRST” thing but we stopped cause the ol’ ladies was getting mad at us. Seeing how ya’ll are getting excited with this again, don’t let Cheekie and I come in and show you just how gangsta we are at getting FIRST.

      You don’t want none of this. I’m like a thief around 12am.

      • DQ

        *I’m like a thief around 12am.*

        Or a light skint Mogwai… whichever one works best. :)

      • SouthernQT2DC

        I used to get excited about being first…then I was first. No glittet, no nothing. Now, no more excitement.

        #dontbelievethehype

        • http://wewereninjas.wordpress.com/ Jay

          Few things as anti-climactic as being first…

      • Starita34

        Uh, did you just call V Renee an old lady? ;-)

        I think it’s silly too…but I did wanna do it once. And now I have. *rasperries*

        • V Renee

          She did!!! It’s cool though, because don’t get it twisted, I stay fly in my gear from Especially Yours. :lol:

          • http://twitter.com/#!/NewYork2VA NY2VA

            “I stay fly in my gear from Especially Yours. ”

            I just popped in for a moment, with my busy a$$, and this comment right here, hath slain me!

          • http://twitter.com/SmartFoxGirl SmartFoxGirl

            LOL! I wrote that before you replied…never Ms. V! :)

      • http://www.pinchmycheekie.wordpress.com Cheekie

        LOL, naw, I just got bored wif it. I still pop up on a first air now and again. Don’t sleep, doe! Because ya never know when I’ll pop up!

        *dramatic chipmunk*

    • V Renee

      *sigh* at the first/second/third.

      Maybe it’s because I just.don’t.get.it! I honestly don’t. I would understand if they gave out Amazon gift certificates, free copies of their book, a kiss, a glass of wine, Liz , but they don’t. It’s annoying confusing.

      • http://twitter.com/SmartFoxGirl SmartFoxGirl

        I see how it’s annoying too lol

        • V Renee

          ;)

      • http://www.pinchmycheekie.wordpress.com Cheekie

        It is, doe. Ya gotta be snarky/funny/original wif if ya do it too. Which is why I kinda got a special glee out of the fact that Star got first and said “Second!” I giggled at that for quite some time. Happiness.

        • Starita34

          Yeah, I tried to mix it up and ish….joke totally would’ve failed had I actually got second…

  • Femster

    Oooh first?!? *grabs crotch and moonwalks*

  • eazy

    she went there for the publicity.

    • DQ

      And it was obvious. Everyone who is selling a book or any other media project (yeah Jalen I’m looking at you pimp) says something inflammatory that they know will get people to watch for which they will *quote fingers* clarify later.

      $h!t is mad transparent.

      • WayUPThere

        I’m glad I’m not the only one who realized what Jalen was doing when he left the feelings about who Duke recruits in there…

        …and he was successful to, because it was the most viewed 30 for 30 documentary to that point. Eric Bischoff said it best: “controversy creates cash”

        • B. Brown

          Anyone who quotes Eric Bischoff is alright in my book. Props.

          • Alvin

            Haha, true. Eric Bischoff is classic.

        • http://kineticculture.com NubianEmpress

          …and so does misogyny.

          I wonder how much money rap would make if it took out every ‘b*tch, p*ssy, and gay’ reference…most of them wouldn’t have sh*t to talk about.

          • http://thoughtsparadigm.blogspot.com afterthought

            I really wonder how our community would be if so many people’s lives wasn’t infected with things like drugs, prostitution, and crime. To me, the whole industry is amazing – I mean these are people who were expected to be nothing and contribute nothing to society and they created a multi million (?billion?) dollar industry. And its like Tupac’s Rose That Grew From Concrete poem, are you really gonna look at the rose and say, “but its got scratches on it” or are you gonna be amazed that the rose grew from the concrete?

            • Starita34

              Depends…does this rose infect and degrade those around it or make life better and more beautiful for those around it?

              • http://thoughtsparadigm.blogspot.com afterthought

                So you’re saying that rose may be a weed in disguise.

                Maybe I’m wrong, but I really feel like there are certain segments of the population that people expect to do well – the ones with good grades, the ones who are good athletes, the ones who come from good backgrounds, etc. Then there are the rest of us, who society kinda says if you make it great, but I won’t hold my breath. Hip hop came from the leftovers of that part of society – the people who the rest of us point at and say “you’re whats holding us back”. So the fact that this industry, created by them ninjas who at one point in time would be asked to step outside of the room when it came time for a family photo, can be a multi billion dollar industry is something I do respect. What did Riley say, “game recognize game”.

                To the other extent, look at a book like “The Art of War”, a book which many call a classic piece of literature. Does the fact that it is often found on the bookshelves of serial killers make it less of a classic? Is it causing these people to think this way? I’d love to live in a perfect society, but until I get to Heaven I’m limited by whats around me. Part of the art of hip hop is limited by the vision of the artists. And sometimes the vision of the artist isn’t the same as the vision of their consumers. I don’t think Sun Tzu saw his book being thought to be the cause of serial killers.

                So similarly, when I see hip hop, I see the rose. I see how the thorns are scratching people and a bunch of other metaphors, but what I see first is a rose that grew from concrete and for that I just stand in amazement.

                • Starita34

                  “So similarly, when I see hip hop, I see the rose. I see how the thorns are scratching people and a bunch of other metaphors, but what I see first is a rose that grew from concrete and for that I just stand in amazement.”

                  I can’t be mad at that at all.
                  #Respect

            • Starita34

              A few multimillionaires spewing hate doesn’t help the community at large…you should read the 40 Million Dollar slave.

              • Starita34

                sorry, not “you should” rather, “might I suggest”…

              • http://www.kimhess.com Kim

                Thanks for the book tip, going to get it and read it!

                • Starita34

                  *thumbs up*

            • CleverScreenName

              I see where you’re going with this… And I agree with this line of thinking. Art that reflects life should be cherished, not disparaged because we don’t like what we see in the mirror.

              On the other hand, I’m skeptical about the percentage of (popular/famous) rappers who are actually trying to reflect the world around them with their rhymes, versus trying to sound like something else that’s moving a lot of units.

              And personally, I think that the lady has every right to say what she wants to say about Hip-Hop. Artists put themselves out there for better or for worse when they make music. I don’t believe that her criticisms are less valid because she’s a country music singer. I’m not a musician at all and I’m commenting on Hip-Hop right now (though it comes from a place of love and I see that The Champ’s issue is that Ashley Judd’s comments come from a place of ignorance or distance – that she doesn’t really know the world she’s criticizing).

              I think that the industry of Hip-Hop is a lightening rod for criticism from “Real Hip-Hop Heads” for essentially the same reason that it’s criticized by Ashley Judd and so many other people who probably don’t know anything about the world of Hip-Hop: because at it’s core, Hip-Hop is about expressing honesty through art. But any industry, at its core, is about making as much money as possible – those two goals are diametrically opposed to one another and can’t really exist in the same place at the same time. So we end up with a bunch of crap that nobody really likes.

              • http://thoughtsparadigm.blogspot.com afterthought

                On the other hand, I’m skeptical about the percentage of (popular/famous) rappers who are actually trying to reflect the world around them with their rhymes, versus trying to sound like something else that’s moving a lot of units.

                I don’t even think its about reflecting the world around them, Do you really think Stevie Wonder can see a ribbin in the sky? No. But does that mean that it isn’t a classic song? I think not. Honestly, I would sleep better at night if I thought that half the rappers I listen to DIDN’T do the stuff they rap about. I mean, Immortal Technique has a song (Dance with the Devil) where he talks about making a dude rape his mother as initiation into a gang. Thats so depressing that I hope and pray that its fiction. But whats fiction for some of us is fact and reality for others. Lupe got into trouble for rapping about skating (Kick/Push), but he’s not a skater. I think being an artist is all about being able to make me see your vision. If that vision came from your life, your dreams, or your nightmares doesn’t really matter to me. I’m gonna judge you on how well you construct that image for me and how much I like it.

                because at it’s core, Hip-Hop is about expressing honesty through art. But any industry, at its core, is about making as much money as possible – those two goals are diametrically opposed to one another and can’t really exist in the same place at the same time.

                Thats the thing about capitalism (which many say is diametrically opposed to democracy). What we did was created a genre to express ourselves and tell our stories. What they did is find out a way to make money off our stories, so now the “price of admission” is mysogny, materialism, homophobia, and all these other vices that people say are destroying our community.

                I grew up hip hop and I am hip hop and I will forever defend the artists of hip hop to be able to say whatever they want to say. But I will not defend the record execs and labels and tv stations and radio stations that try to define hip hop and put it inside a box or limit it to this area or that area. For too long this conversation has been about the pawns in the rap game, while the real players go untouched. I want to change the industry to one where a J-Live has just as much of a chance to make it as a Wiz Khalifa.

                • CleverScreenName

                  I don’t even think its about reflecting the world around them, Do you really think Stevie Wonder can see a ribbin in the sky? No. But does that mean that it isn’t a classic song? I think not.

                  I’m not saying that artists have to experience everything that they rap/sing about to make it valid or classic. Of course Stevie’s never seen a ribbon or the sky. And No, Lupe isn’t a skater. But they each used their metaphors to express something they saw (no offense, Stevie) in the world around them. Stevie viewing (I know, still a poor choice of words) love as destiny, Lupe relating skating to hustling/having a drive that comes from within. Each comes from a place of honesty and each is valid and artistic for it.

                  What I’m calling invalid is when someone makes a song, which plenty of people do, just because they think that’s the song that they’re supposed to make for the sound that the industry wants at the moment.

                  It’s not truth and these are usually the songs that I, Ashley Judd, and probably you Hate about Hip-Hop.

      • Shelby

        My sentiments exactly. So, when people make these inflammatory statements for the sole purpose of gaining attention for their own profit, I form no real opinion about their statements because their statements aren’t real to me.

        Now if she was on some women’s lib tip at an event or an appearance where that topic was her main point and she said these statements, then I would have an opinion.

        • Candy Girl

          Agreed. Don’t really see hip hop as being a mainstay in her life. Or if she is, it’s not something anyone was ever aware. Her .02 on that subject, truthful as it may have been, was thrown in to create a buzz and make her some monies.

          The Judds have been around for a long time, and she’s the only one in movies, and yet, seemingly remains as the least popular. Perhaps she decided it was time for a change. By any means necessary. No Malcolm. (She may not be feelin him too tough either).

      • http://lifesentenced.com Chris_Advocate

        I don’t think Jalen said it for publicity, but he was just being honest about how he felt 20 years ago. I mean I was like 10 when those teams played and I felt like that and it wasnt like I was even in the hood…well at least at that point.

        Ashley Judd on the other hand made those comments out of her limited view and scope of hip hop. People, generally, are sheep and if those around them feel a certain, or people whose opinion they value feel a certain way, then folks will fall in line accordingly. Couple this with the fact that its in the interest of media producers to appeal to the lowest common denominator and im sure the only hip hop A.J. knows is whats programmed by Clear Channel.

        If she were to dig deeper I’m sure she would find plenty of rap music that is neither misogynistic or rape-promoting. I think the bigger, sadder issue is that one would have to dig deep to find this music in the first place.

        Oh well.

        • Mo-VSS

          While he may have felt that way during that time, he said it on the documentary because he knew it would generate buzz.

        • Pass the Popcorn

          I agree. There are plenty of rappers who would are not misogynistic like Lupe Fiasco, Mos Def, etc. and chances are people will have never heard of them. It’s sad.

    • Hawaii

      Ditto. Otherwise, who would’ve known her a§§ had memoir? :|
      To me, she looks pathetic that THIS is the only reason anyone is even discussing her sh*t.

  • http://www.awordorthree.com Crystal Marie

    CMG = Not a Hip Hop head or serious fan. CMG = not a Jay-Z fan. However, CMG is a fan of eloquence, history and pop culture, so I’m currently reading Jay-Z’s Decoded. I have to say… reading his book has completely changed my reaction to Ashley Judd’s comments. I probably would have been a reluctant supporter of what she said, because the misogyny in hip-hop is ridiculously grotesque at times. However, learning where hip hop comes from, its diversity, and the danger in putting in all in one box marked POISONOUS RAPE CULTURE! doesn’t fix the problems rooted in the communuties where hip-hop is derived from.

    So I said all that to say, read a book, Ashley Judd. Preferably Jay-Z’s Decoded. (Even though I still think he’s an agent of the devil)

    Crystal Marie
    *insert shameless plug for http://www.awordorthree.com here*

    • http://testorshia.blogspot.com Tes

      I saw that book in the library I think. I jumped back because there’s an image of the Baphomet on the front and I just couldn’t pick it up after that.

      • Yoles

        Tes

        you and me both… i have enough problems not adding anymore satan to the mix… i’ll pass

        • http://testorshia.blogspot.com Tes

          I’m just saying. I don’t need to wake up in the middle of the night and see that staring at me from the bookshelf. No. F’n. Bueno.

          • Girl Kanyeshrug

            Agreed. There’s something about just even having it in your house…. :(

      • http://www.nerdsatthecooltable.com SouthernCharm

        Baphomet? lol. It’s actually Andy Warhol’s Rorschach: http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/andy_warhol/rorschach.php

        VSB: Fighting crime and Illuminati hysteria. lol

        • V Renee

          *thumbs up*

          I was seriously scratching my head like, I didn’t think it was a Baphomet, but let me go check again.

        • http://testorshia.blogspot.com Tes

          That very well may be, but then I wonder what does Jay-Z know about a Rorschach? o.O

          • SoftandPink

            Thanks Southern Charm..I was thinking the same thing..lol

            Why wouldn’t Jay-Z know about Rorschach? Talk about putting hip hop in a box…

            • http://testorshia.blogspot.com Tes

              Not putting in a box, just actual wondering. I’m allowed to wonder, right? :)

          • http://www.nerdsatthecooltable.com SouthernCharm

            Well, Jay-Z is an avid art collector. He drops Warhol’s name in a lot of his rhymes, and even talks about art a lot in the book.

            Maybe the whole Rorschach/Inkblot test works though. Think about it. We see the inkblots and describe what images we see. And those images are associated with our underlying feelings and thought processes. The first thing a lot of folks thought about the cover was that it was ominous/satanic.

            Was it? Or was that what we were looking for? lol

            • http://testorshia.blogspot.com Tes

              I didn’t know that he collected art. Now it makes more sense :)

              I do agree that we see what we want to see instead of what’s there sometimes. I saw the Baphomet…and a butterfly. So there’s always that. Maybe Jay’s also an avid butterfly lover too :D lol

    • IsOurChildrenLearning?

      Let me begin by saying that I am a HUGE hip hop head. However, I don’t think she put all of rap in a box. She wrote “as far as I’m concerned, MOST rap…” Saying that the majority of something is bad doesn’t put it ALL in a box. It purposely makes a distinction and leaves out the remainder. Most top chart topping rap is crazy as hell. True story.

      • http://thoughtsparadigm.blogspot.com afterthought

        but is that stuff really hip hop? I don’t know how I feel about that stuff because to one extent, I feel like artists kinda realized that making money = talking about b****es and h**s over a nice beat, so that became the content of most of whats on radio. So I tend to look for artists who vary their content more and can talk about different things. But then again, who am I to be the hip hop police, trying to say what is/is not hip hop? I mean, I honestly had little respect for Lil Wayne til I heard Carter II.

  • SouthernQT2DC

    All you have to do is watch ANY video on BET after dark, and you’ll see she has a valid point…

    *drops down to get my eagle on*

    • tezzybaby

      *drops down to get my eagle on*

      RIP

      • http://headedintherightdirection.blogspot.com Riley

        DEAD…

        • Starita34

          Bury me by Riley…and please hide that suitcase under my bed before my parents collect my belongings. K? Thanks.

    • IsOurChildrenLearning?

      Did that dance ever catch on in real life? I never saw anyone doing it.

      • Yoles

        ok i’ll admit it… i have gotten my eagle on a time or two…

        • IsOurChildrenLearning?

          I can see that. lol

        • miss t-lee

          me too. :)

        • Starita34

          *quietly sings* You are not alone….I am here with you…
          *makes eye contact*
          *stops singing*
          What!?
          *hums* Only God can judge me, only God…

          • http://thoughtsparadigm.blogspot.com afterthought

            haha

      • WayUPThere

        In a word: YES

        Hell, I remember the black girls going crazy when this song hit at parties, and I went to a PWI for goodness sake.

      • Kidsister

        It most certainly did!! That was def one of the songs that really got the party started.

        *And the DC folks that like GOGO know good and well that BYB still hits that song a couple times a week!! Lol #noshade

        • MrExcelsior

          *And the DC folks that like GOGO know good and well that BYB still hits that song a couple times a week!! Lol #noshade”

          This is very true. God Bless the music of my people!

          • Kidsister

            Mr. E,

            Lol, I knew somebody would feel me. This whole talk about hip hop reminds me of the talks that surround GOGO. They blame Gogo for a lot of violence and such.

            • MrExcelsior

              Exactly. It’s the same argument. Just on a local level.

              Sad thing is very few people take the time to understand the impact of the environment on the music.

              Go-go, just like hip-hop, started off as real party feel-good music. Societal changes brought changes to the music and the culture.

              • Kidsister

                “Sad thing is very few people take the time to understand the impact of the environment on the music.”

                Hello! Say it again!! People like music they can relate to.

                I remember when Jack Johnson tried to shut it down in PG. The GOGO community was OUTRAGED!!! I think individuals need to stand up and take responsibility for their actions and not blame the music.

                • SouthernQT2DC

                  “I remember when Jack Johnson tried to shut it down in PG.”

                  And where is Mr. Johnson now? About to be tried for what?? That’s what he gets for messing with Gogo…

                  • MrExcelsior

                    Message!

                  • Kidsister

                    You can say that again!!!

          • http://kineticculture.com NubianEmpress

            DMV STAND UP!!!!!!!! i love go-go, and i love hip-hop, but as a member of the culture we really need to be clear about what is ok and not ok. OD violence and misogyny? Not ok. Singing ‘Sexy Ladies’? Definitely ok.

            • Kidsister

              WHOOP WHOOP!!!

              I’m with you all day about being clear about what the message is. Though, IDK about Sexy Ladies, that one might be up there with the rest. “I wanna hook up wit you on Saturday, Imma pick you up on Saturday, maybe you can give me some whats-uh-name”

            • SouthernQT2DC

              @ Nubian Empress

              I didn’t know you were in the DMV?

              frenulum…

              • http://kineticculture.com NubianEmpress

                LOLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL YES! I’m here…Panama needs to do a VSB happy hour once a month…MAKE IT SO!

                • SouthernQT2DC

                  I’ll be there, and THIS time I won’t be so quiet! I had to figure y’all out first… Now that I know that VSB is all about the love, it’ll be a different story next time.

        • http://thatdamnafrican.wordpress.com/ That Damn African

          “*And the DC folks that like GOGO know good and well that BYB still hits that song a couple times a week!! Lol #noshade”

          Hahahaha #truth

          • Kidsister

            LOL! Its one of BYB’s greatest hits

      • http://kineticculture.com NubianEmpress

        not really, but i’ve see folks drop down and get their kegel on….

        too soon?

        • Kidsister

          *FLATLINE* ———————————–

      • Kema

        We did it in Richmond, VA… *hangs head*

        • http://kineticculture.com NubianEmpress

          Yeah Richmond is pretty hood….lol. I grew up there and live in Northern VA now. *wistful sigh*

        • Jai

          Richmond to DC people are representing!

      • http://twitter.com/SmartFoxGirl SmartFoxGirl

        That’s a dancehall move Jamaicans have been doing for a while now.

        Yes everything started in Jamaica. Don’t argue.

    • WestPointProper

      Dig my grave.

    • V Renee

      *drops down to get my eagle on* .

      BWHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

      So no trip drilling for you?

      • SouthernQT2DC

        Nelly’s kinda short (yesterday’s topic), so I dunno about that :(

        • V Renee

          But didn’t Nelly do Drop Down and get Your Eagle On?!

          Again with regard to yesterday’s topic, if a shorty doo woop has enough game to get you to drop down and get your eagle on, one can overlook his height. LOL

          • SouthernQT2DC

            From what I understand (and I could be wrong) “getting your eagle on” is just dancing, whereas tip drilling involves possible penetration. As short as Nelly is, he can’t put his wang anywhere near me…the possibility of midget-ing is just too great :(

  • http://www.max-logic.com max

    I’m mad I even know about this Ashley Judd foolishness, but the fact that there are less than 300 comments on this post right now compels me to add one of my own.

    This is nothing more than a classic case of people speaking out of school. She has a lot of influence and her initial remark was – if not exactly 100% untrue – completely unnecessary and irresponsible.

    • Girl Kanyeshrug

      Its just for publicity.

      The first thing they released about the book was about abuse she’s suffered.

      Well she’s been talking about that stuff (on Oprah) for so many years that it didn’t create a buzz so they released this stuff about rap and now there is a firestorm.

  • Corey

    First Deez and then second deez. She spoke on it because in all honesty who’s really going to contradict what she put out there? Most male dominated stuff is at a minimum mildly misogynistic. Even groups of men just choppin it up. On the flip side, music is an artform and art isn’t always about when you’re happy and in love prancing through a meadow of sugarplums while unicorns play harps and carebears ejaculate glitter on everyone. Art reflects reality (whether its yours or someone else’s).

    • Corey

      *honestly*

      • Lina

        you had it right the first time

        • Corey

          The slumber beckons me!

    • DQ

      The glitter ejaculation is probably too much… you should probably expect to hear from the FCC over that one.

      • tezzybaby

        LOL i was thinking the same d@mn thing…

      • Starita34

        That line slayed me!! lol, a Carebear facial!?! Really though!?

        • DQ

          With the “wind chime” sound effect to give it that magical feel

          • Starita34

            YASSSSS!

            This smile on my face and I thank you! :-D

      • http://twitter.com/SmartFoxGirl SmartFoxGirl

        Didn’t I copyright “glitter ejaculation” last year? Thieves.

    • http://thecochranfirm.wordpress.com/2010/11/15/in-appreciation-of/ Dasher of The Newport Dashers

      I don’t think she had a valid point. Her choice of words was terrible. “Rape culture” really? Hip Hop is a consensual sex culture, and very few things are more empowering for a woman than being able to bed whomever she chooses.

      • Omar

        “Her choice of words was terrible. “Rape culture” really? Hip Hop is a consensual sex culture…”

        Exactly, it’s even a rough sex culture at times but the rape comment from someone who probably rarely listens to any rap music is a stretch, I’m almost certain she, like my father, half of the time doesn’t even understand the words.

        Misogyny is one thing, rappers far and away aren’t the only misogynists in this society, but when she makes it seem like an entire culture of people endorses rape people have a right to have a problem with it.

      • http://www.gravatar.com/avatar/2c55fb22ab4d433dc3fb875db79c619d.png insertwittyacronym

        I have to respectfully disagree with your point on r@pe culture. “r@pe culture” is a term used by feminist to describe a society where women’s bodies are available for by s.exual default along with victim blaming, and s.exual objectification. so this term encompasses not just the act of s.exual violence, but the anyone who suggests that the victim “got what she asked for by wearing ___” or being in a certain place after a particular time. given the currently lyrics being churned out by today’s hip-hop, its misogynistic message is very clear. i will, however, concede the point that the hyper-s.exuality of today’s artist is not gender-specific and there is very little slut shaming (for women or men).

        • Omar

          “women’s bodies are available for by s.exual default along with victim blaming, and s.exual objectification”

          I’m assuming you meant available sexually by default, in this case it is the image of women being sexually available by default which seems to be almost the exact same thing as sexual objectification, which hip hop definitely is(does) however I can’t think of many victim blaming lyrics. So I guess the question becomes is sexual objectification enough to claim some thing as “rape culture” because then the same can be said of advertising, right?

        • Omar

          “Rape culture is a term used within women’s studies and feminism, describing a culture in which rape and sexual violence against women are common and in which prevalent attitudes, norms, practices, and media condone, normalize, excuse, or tolerate sexual violence against women. The term is often used to describe contemporary American culture as a whole.[1]

          Within rape culture, acts of sexism are commonly employed to validate and rationalize normative misogynistic practices. For instance, sexist jokes may be told to foster disrespect for women and an accompanying disregard for their well-being. An example would be a female rape victim being blamed for her being raped because of how she dressed or acted. In rape culture, sexualized violence towards women is regarded as a continuum in a society that regards women’s bodies as sexually available by default.[2] Examples of behaviors that typify rape culture include victim blaming and sexual objectification.” – Good ole wikipedia

          It seems that sexual objectification is an aspect of and may lead to “rape culture” but doesn’t seem to be solely defined by it, the defining factor seems to be “prevalent attitudes, norms, practices, and media condone, normalize, excuse, or tolerate sexual violence against women.”

          Also if America as a whole is seen by a number of feminists as a “rape culture” then isn’t singling out hip hop a little arbitrary?

          • http://www.gravatar.com/avatar/2c55fb22ab4d433dc3fb875db79c619d.png insertwittyacronym

            @omar agreed, singling out HH is arbitrary (as apposed to laying the blame on advertising or american society in general). as such the music of today is a symptom and not the cause. but that still does not excuse the rampant s.exual objectification of women. using words like r@pe culture, is salacious, probably gratuitous but it did get the conversations going…. i suppose the more disheartening thing to note is the support of (certain) artists by young females, as evidenced by record sales, concert tickets, and offers of free s$x.

      • dos pesos

        Agreed. A lot of rap could be described as suporting a female exploitation culture–but exploitation is not rape. The whole “pimp” mentality adhered to like gospel by many hip hop artists and in vogue a couple of years ago is all about exploiting females sexuality for male gain. Reprehensible..yes, morally bankrupt, probably true, but again that’s not rape. Even lyrics that reek of hatred for women like “b@thces aint s@it but h@es and tricks” doesn’t condone non-consensual sex. Its assumed that the woman is a willing participant….even if the activity she is involved in is self destructive and degrading to her.

      • IsOurChildrenLearning?

        Rape Culture is a common term amongst feminists and the like. It doesn’t literally mean raping everybody out here. I think this misunderstanding of the term is what’s getting people up in arms.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rape_culture

        according to how the term is used in these circles, rap music is a rape culture.

        • http://thecochranfirm.wordpress.com/2010/11/15/in-appreciation-of/ Dasher of The Newport Dashers

          For hip hop to be a rape culture you have to ignore the fact the majority of the pillars can’t be argued to be misogynistic or violent to women, and pay no mind to the history of women being free to give rebuttals to the images pushed by the big money backed misogynists. From its earliest days Hip Hop has offered women the chance to balance out negative images. One of the genre’s most celebrated “beefs” The Roxanne Wars, is an example of the power of women to answer supposed misogynists.

          • IsOurChildrenLearning?

            Nope. In order for rap to be a rape culture as it is used in her circles, we just need to look at the definition once again. Also, the pillars of hip hop aren’t of concern in this specific comment, the majority of popular rap music and the action it supports are. Also, citing a single 20+ year old beef record by a woman doesn’t make rap less misogynistic. We can disagree, thats fine. However I don’t think we should flip around definitions to fit our needs.

  • P.

    The last time I heard Ashley Judd’s name in reference to something other than Kentucky basketball was… I got nothin.

    • DQ

      And thus her unsolicited opinion on hip hop. Why else would we even be conscious to not give a @#$% what she thinks. I mean without her comments, we do it unconsciously… it’s like breathing at night.

  • IsOurChildrenLearning?

    ” I’m not so certain that hip-hop needs a country music scion to police it, and I’m definitely not certain why she even felt the need to go there.”

    I feel like her comments on rap were a couple of throwaway sentences that had little bearing on the main thesis of her book. Someone just got ahold of those words and made a bigger deal. Honestly, who gives a f*ck? I feel like people in our community sometimes prefer to get up in arms over perceived slights rather than getting up in arms about the real problems we have. This whole “nobody can say ANYTHING about ANYTHING that is perceived to be a part of our culture EVEN IF THEY’RE RIGHT isn’t helping the image of the community at all. Hit dogs holler.

    • Mr. Gundam

      I feel like her comments on rap were a couple of throwaway sentences that had little bearing on the main thesis of her book. Someone just got ahold of those words and made a bigger deal. Honestly, who gives a f*ck?

      Co-sign 100%, I pretty much hit my quota of “Let’s make a big deal about it-of-the-day!!!” this week

      The aftermath of this statement makes it worst. She had to defend herself all over twitter, which makes it look like the statement was used to promote her book.

      Still…..she correct. Today’s rap/hip hop is not positive toward women at all. That’s the main point. Truth is the beat is fire, sometimes you just want to shake it. I think we(black folk) don’t really want to go through a litmus test of our favorite artist.

      Speaking of litmus test what you guys think of B.O.B.?

      • IsOurChildrenLearning?

        “I pretty much hit my quota of “Let’s make a big deal about it-of-the-day!!!” this week”

        Tell me about it. As great as social networks are they can suffocate you with “controversies” that are not at all give-a-f*ck-able. Also, lack reading comprehension skills seem to be at the bottom of most of these events. B.O.B? I’ve only heard his song w/ the Mexican little person. It was straight.

        • tezzybaby

          You betta not be calling my Bruno Mars Mexican, this makes me sad :(

          • IsOurChildrenLearning?

            Ah, turns out that he’s Filipino and Puerto Rican, which is a long way to say Mexican.

          • http://blackpicket.com brownivyx

            Me too :-( He’s a cutie pie. He won my pseudo-heart with his Grammy performance.

            • Sula

              He won my pseudo-heart

              Why your heart got to be pseudo though? :lol:

              • http://blackpicket.com brownivyx

                Cuz he’s too short.

                heheh

                • Starita34

                  lol, I see what you did there…

                • Shelby

                  Awww, dizzam. Did we not put that baby to bed? Short guys need love to. Especially from the amazons. LOL

                • Kema

                  I love Bruno! How tall is he?

      • Sula

        I am glad I removed myself from social media and the likes for a little while… because I, too, am tired sir. Can we vote on issues that need to be addressed? Digg them up or something? Because much like IsOurChildrenLearning said, it gets annoying to tell people not to criticize something very real and VERY true…just because the person is not supposed to know about it.

        The problem with art is that, it’s put out there for EVERY SINGLE person to talk about… and she may not know hip-hop like an average VSB or VSS but it’s a public forum and she has the right to have an opinion about it… and it’s even more interesting where her opinion is not that far of a stretch from reality.

        • Mo-VSS

          Preach! The truth is the truth no matter who says it. And why folks are mad or feel as though she shouldn’t have said it or it wasn’t her place baffle me. She wrote a book..her memoirs which pretty much means she can put whatever she wants to in it.

      • Starita34

        “Truth is the beat is fire, sometimes you just want to shake it. I think we(black folk) don’t really want to go through a litmus test of our favorite artist.”

        I’m not Black folk, but if this ain’t the d@mn truth! No Ashley Judd. (Too soon?)
        For real though, sometimes a beat is just super bumpin! You hear yourself singing about b!tches and h0s, but that music moves you…not that we’re not still culpable for our behaviors, but…yeah…I still listen to Akinyele….

        Good post on socially conscious consumption here –> http://bit.ly/febSe5

        • WayUPThere

          Yeah back in my college days i’d see and hear girls completely agree in forums that said rapper spit lyrics demeaning to women only to be grinding to them same lyrics later that hr, day, or week, and even sing along if the song was good enough.

          Starita, u ain’t never lie…

          • Young Brolic

            Exactly! These women complain about how mysoginistic rap is, but they start doing the soul clap when “there’s some h0es in this house” comes on at the club.

            • Kema

              I know I do a booty shake to some very mysoginistic rap but for some reason I just cannot get with “there’s some h0es in this house”. #ijustcant

              • Starita34

                You know what song stops me? “OPP”…it’s silly, but I just can not scream, “yeah, you know me”…it’s silly really, cause “My B!tch Bad” is my SONG.
                #BishesBeIllogicalShrug
                #SWIDT?

      • DQ

        *Still…..she correct. Today’s rap/hip hop is not positive toward women at all. That’s the main point. Truth is the beat is fire, sometimes you just want to shake it. I think we(black folk) don’t really want to go through a litmus test of our favorite artist.*

        I disagree. The rap/hip hop that’s PROMOTED is by and large not positive toward women at all in part because there is no consequence to selling this kind of music. Us so called “conscious” folks will “phooey ba hum bug” the music, progressives will protest it, and everyone else (both men AND women) will be jamming to it no matter how outrageous the language is. If you think it’s bad now just wait. You wait to you all start to hear the lyrics from folk like Tyler the Creator, Earl Swirtshirt, or anyone else from the OFWGKTA network. Eminem will sound down right charitable by comparison.

        Anyway the point is, there are all sorts of hip hop out there to fit your framework and perspective, you just have to look for it… because it’s not going to be promoted.

        • IsOurChildrenLearning?

          I’ve decided that I’m just too damn old for Odd Future. iCant Lol

          • DQ

            It’s understandable. Those dudes are WAY out there. I think I counted 2 separate and unrelated references to r@pe in one less than 4 bars in one of their songs. But shamefully I liked the beat. :(

        • MzPW

          If that’s thye case, I’mma go ‘head and stick with Prince. Ooouuuwww! (Somethin’ like that)

          • MzPW

            …and by “thye”, I mean “maybe I should gone ‘head and get some sleep, instead of misspelling sight words.”

        • Amazonian Midget

          I just listened to an Earl Sweatshirt song and Tyler the Creator snippet…and felt like I was going straight to Hell for listening. I’m someone who lives for horror films (true horror, not this gore mess that’s out now) and has a strong stomach. Earl’s video made me want to vomit. Looked like a live action Garbage Pail Kids music video and the lyrics were disgusting.

          I’m only 7 years older than these kids and I’m too old for it. So, @ IsOurChildrenLearning, I understand.

      • sunshyne84

        I love Bobby!!!!

      • http://twitter.com/inomallday Shamira

        “I feel like her comments on rap were a couple of throwaway sentences that had little bearing on the main thesis of her book. Someone just got ahold of those words and made a bigger deal. Honestly, who gives a f*ck?”

        EXACTLY. The book is not “Ashley Judd’s feelings on Hip-Hop and Women.” That wasn’t even what the CHAPTER was about. People are just salty because she said something that was rooted in truth and bungled it up. Disagree with her, fine, but don’t deny her right to her opinion. Especially when for the most part…she’s right.

    • http://snarkyasiwant2b.wordpress.com SnarkyChic

      Cosign…while everyone is all up in arms about Ashley Judd and two pointless sentences in a collage of pointless words she’s calling her memoir our children aren’t graduating, getting STDs at alarming rates and don’t have fathers. One of these things is not like the other…or maybe I’m wrong. We need to stop deviating from the significant issues that impact our community.

      At the same time we’re acting like she’s lying…come on listen to the radio, catch BET after dark and you know Ashley ain’t never told no lie. This doesn’t in any way stop me from adding these songs to my These Songs Ruin Futures’ playlist on my iPod. I know they’re foolish but it’s a party it’s a party it’s a partay!!!!

      • Young Brolic

        So if you’re buying the music, aren’t you in some way co-signing the message thats being put out there by the music? Not to say that you totally agree with the message, but its somehow acceptable enough for you to buy it and blast it in the whip or on the ipod. In that vein, how can people complain about the music being too mysoginistic? If its so demeaning then stop buying it, no?

        • Mo-VSS

          I don’t buy or download or illegally steal it….so I have every right to criticize because I don’t support that sh*t at all.

          • Young Brolic

            I would love to see your iPod library. There’s so much music out there that’s mysoginistic in some way. I think people who claim they don’t listen to mysoginistic rap is akin to people who don’t call themselves a smoker because you never bought a pack of cigarettes or a dime bag, and just smoke up everybody else’s stuff lol. Just kidding. Good for you for not buying it. I think thats the only way to flip the script, and have the powers that be try and promote another message through their pawns in the game…i.e. Lil’ Wayne, Gucci Mane, etc.

      • Dom

        “These Songs Ruin Futures’ playlist on my iPod”

        Hilarious! And true. If only the children in our community knew the difference!

    • http://www.awonderlust.blogspot.com sarah

      co-sign

      She is only reiterating a sentiment said by many folk about rap music and videos a la Boycott BET. What’s a real mess is that, once again, it took a white woman to get everyone agog.

    • V Renee

      I feel like her comments on rap were a couple of throwaway sentences that had little bearing on the main thesis of her book. .

      YES! Exactly. And if I was her, I would not have apologized for the truth.

  • Asia

    While she has a valid point I have to agree with Champ on his assessment on whether she should have been the one championing this point. I know when I heard about this on some hip hop station the first thing that came to my mind is “Ashley Judd listens to rap music”?. I find it hard to take her comments seriously especially if she hasn’t allowed herself to be exposed to all that hip hop culture has to offer.