A Primer On The Use, Usage, Versatility, And Utility Of “Nigga” » VSB

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A Primer On The Use, Usage, Versatility, And Utility Of “Nigga”

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During a post-game press conference after losing to Wisconsin Saturday night, a sensitive mic caught Kentucky guard Andrew Harrison saying “Fuck that nigga” under his breath while at the podium. The comment was a response to a reporter’s question about Wisconsin forward Frank Kaminsky, who is about as far from Black as you’d expect someone from Wisconsin named “Frank Kaminsky” would be.

Despite the fact that, if you listen to the comment, Harrison’s “fuck that nigga” is clearly (clearly!) said in a bit of a half annoyed/half joking manner instead of pure anger, it became a thing. Because the use and usage of nigga — and the cultural double standard that “allows” Black people to say it — will apparently always be a thing.

So, to clear up any confusion — and by “clear up any” I totally mean “cause more” — here’s a short primer on nigga, which I’ve decided to call “The Short Nigga Primer.”

In your introduction you seem to be defending Harrison. How is that right, when Harrison is clearly in the wrong here?

I’m not defending Harrison. He’s actually in the wrong for a completely different reason (which I’ll discuss in a sec). I’m merely stating that “nigga” use and usage is a bit more nuanced than some of the pearl clutching about this suggests. Harrison wasn’t using it as a slur. The feeling behind it was no different than if he said “man” or “dude” instead.

So, in your opinion, how was Harrison in the wrong?

The problem with what Harrison did is that he violated the second rule of “nigga” use. Only use it around people who understand, and aren’t offended by, the use and usage of nigga. Basically, if there’s anyone within earshot who might be uncomfortable with it — and this includes both non-Black people and other Black people — you probably shouldn’t use it as freely. Basically, treat it like a profanity.

Ironically, Kaminsky likely had no problem with it. And, since he’s obviously been around hundreds of Black basketball players — and presumably has heard “nigga” hundreds of times — he probably has a more nuanced understanding of it than some of the adults writing about it do.

What’s the first rule of nigga use?

Make sure you’re a Black person first.

There are Black people who get offended by other Black people saying nigga?

Definitely! There are going to be some Black people upset I’m even writing about it. This is why it’s important to know your audience. This also stresses the point that nigga is a word that suggests a certain familiarity. Veteran nigga users (and yes, “veteran nigga user” is definitely on my business cards) know you should probably only use it around people you’re familiar with. (And, more importantly, people who are familiar with you.)

Let me put it this way: I (obviously) use nigga. I don’t use it frequently — I’ve probably typed it more today than I’ve said it in the last couple weeks — but I’m obviously comfortable with it. But, I’ll admit that if some Black dude I never met, seen, or heard of before came up to me today and said “What’s up, nigga?” I’d probably feel a certain way about it. Not because he called me nigga. But because he doesn’t know me well enough to call me nigga. Nigga is not an introduction. Nigga is something you use after the introduction has already happened.

This might seem complicated, but most Black people — at least most Black veteran users of nigga — understand this. It’s intuitive, and this goes back to the point about the level of nuance with nigga use and usage. It’s a complicated word — perhaps the English language’s most complicated word — and to use it rightly means that you’ve received enough nigga-use education to understand that. Basically, you’ve earned it.

Switching gears a bit, Kaminsky — as you pointed out — is White. Why would Harrison use that word in reference to a White guy?

In the past month, I’ve referred to each of the following things as a “nigga.”

My car. A bottle of hot sauce. A basketball. The weather. My dog. My wife. A grape. Jason Statham. The concept of having an all-red party. The concept of attending a party where the hosts expect you to wear all red. The eight of clubs. The internet.

Point? When you’re a veteran nigga user, nigga can be any and everything. Noun, pronoun, verb, adverb, adjective, transitive verb, prepositional phrase, White guy from Wisconsin, whatever. It’s complicated, man.

 

Damon Young

Damon Young is the editor-in-chief of VSB. He is also a columnist for GQ.com And he's working on a book of essays to be published by Ecco (HarperCollins). Damon is busy. He lives in Pittsburgh, and he really likes pancakes. Reach him at damon@verysmartbrothas.com. Or don't. Whatever.

  • Pinks

    Fc*k them otha ni g gas cus I’m down for my ni g gas.

    But really, I’m mad we still have to explain this to people. Are you black? Then yes, you may use the word ni g ga. Just make sure it’s not around some really old people, really young people, or people who ask for Grey Poupon at brunch.

    Are you not black? Take yo arse to the sidelines and just watch while we nig, my nig.

  • Sigma_Since 93

    Bout time mayne!

    Where do I start…………..Coach Cal you’ve gotta do better. I know most of your squad is there for a year but you need to have the public speaking folks do a better job prepping these kids because microphones will be in their faces often for the foreseeable future. If your claim to fame is getting kids to the big show, teach them how to deal with the media because that’s a part of the job too.

    Andrew Harrison you gotta do better. I know your folks have taught you how to codeswitch. At a minimum, you should have learned a lesson from Wisconsin’s Nigel Hayes when his whispers of “She’s hot” was picked up by the 3 million microphones on the stage. I hope your agent buys you a thesaurus prior to the NBA combine.

    • Val

      Code-switching is becoming a lost art.

  • Nicholas Peters

    I always thought the reason white people get upset over the use of the word n!gg@ was that it is something that not only black people can do that white people can’t but also that black people can regulate over white people and they don’t like that dynamic…

    was always confused about black people who get upset over the word n!gg@..don’t you know that is what you are?

    *Bonus* Memphis Bleek Garnier Fructis commercial

    • IsitFridayyet?

      I think you hit the nail on the head in your first paragraph. I find it funny that some don’t see White Privilege showing in the debate surrounding the N-word. It seems that some have the “I have a right to say whatever I want without consequence” mentality when in reality, there are terms within a variety of social groups that I, as an outsider, cannot use.

    • Madame Zenobia

      I agree with IsitFridayyet. You got it right with that first paragraph.

    • DBoySlim

      The first paragraph is absolutely correct. If a non-black person asks why they can’t say it just ask them why the want to.

  • Lola

    for years i’ve said ”nigga’ is just like ‘smurf’, and while smurfs can mean everything when they say it… gargamel better not’

  • Tentpole

    This is an excellent example of the difference between being educated and intelligent. Educated people have learned how to use the word and because it just a word, why not use it any way you want. Intelligent people understand the history of the word and all the dead bodies that were created because being a N*I*G*G*A meant that a white person could do to you what they wanted without any consequences. The next time you complain about racism or white cops killing another one of us, just remember N*I*G*G*A is just a word to be use any way you see fit.

    • I can’t really agree with this.

      I have always felt that the -er and -a versions were both the creation of people who do not participate in the debate period. As with most slangs, it’s always something that develops from the lower tiers of society, as we see today…thus why slangs are associated with vulgarity or common people.

      The idea that the words were somehow developed for grandiose purposes is a creation of academic myth that gives intelligent and educated people the ability to spew their rationalizations as to where the words came from and what purpose they serve. 50 years from now, we’re going to be hearing that the term “swag” was invented so that black people could display that despite 400 years of slavery and oppression, that they have still been able to maintain their roots in African culture which manifests itself as pride in all the ways in which they express themselves.

      • AlwaysCC

        i tried to reply to a post earlier, but disqus was tripping…so if this shows up 8 times – sorry!
        i think it’s just the nature of language (concerning the connotation of words). lots of words are used as positive or negative depending on the situation – fool, stupid, bad…all of those are “negative” words that are used in a different way. and you are absolutely correct about slang being associated with “common people” and uneducated people. i think the whole conversation about the word n***a is fascinating, personally…i love hearing all of the viewpoints for/against its use.

        • It is interesting…but it’s not based on reality.

          The people who are arguing about it, tend to lack the creativity to come up with such terms to begin with. To be creative with words and language, always requires an ability not to take words and language seriously, thus why it was young people on Instant Messaging applications and Cellphones who developed LOL, LMAO, BRB…and all the other “leetspeech” that we take for granted in our generation. You think if it was left to the people who argue endlessly about what words mean, could have come up with such a thing?

          The fact is they don’t know. All they know is a group of black people invented it, and they don’t like when white people (who often don’t get it, and are too lazy to look into how they should) use it.

          • AlwaysCC

            even when blacks are debating the word…it is interesting to hear the arguments about meaning, utility, audience, etc. that’s when i typically hear more about class, education, and perception instead of “we can use it; they can’t” arguments

            • Oh ok I get you now.

              Ultimately, I view the word n*gga as seasoning: salt, maggi, knorr cubes, goya etc.

              There’s never a time it is used, where it doesn’t make an emotion or a sentence more expressive than it originally would have been without it. That’s of course, if you’re using it right. Maybe that’s why white folks struggle to use it right, they tend not to know what to do with seasoning, as all those dry grilled chicken I ate in college was a perfect reminder of.

              • AlwaysCC

                i like that analogy lol

          • Wild Cougar

            zackly, its the uncreative that keep urging the rest of us to color in the lines, or else.

    • Question

      That’s the worst demarcation for the difference between educated and intelligent that I’ve ever heard.

      No.

  • Miklonis

    I’m glad you brought this up. I noticed the same thing at the Justin Bieber roast, where the N-word flew wildly amongst a largely white audience. It’s no wonder white folk are confused about its usage when Snoop calls Biebs his nigga, and talks about how black/nigga-ish Bieber has become, using all negative traits, of course. This is what I was getting at last week about how we have to change our current definition of blackness and what it entails.

    It is lazy to use the n-word in all situations towards all people and then get upset when the wrong person uses it. Who is the “right” person? Why are they the right person? Could they be the wrong person in black packaging? I’ve heard black people use the word (Chris Rock comes to mind) to separate good black people from bad black people (here’s a good article on that http://www.salon.com/2014/11/12/chris_rocks_poisonous_legacy_how_to_get_rich_and_exalted_chastising_bad_blacks/ )

    I have used the n-word, and may use it again, but it is not an essential part of my vocabulary and not necessary to buttress my blackness. I could live without saying it, and if it went away, I think we’d be better off for it.

    • Sigma_Since 93

      “It is lazy to use the n-word in all situations”

      Puts $2 in the collection plate. What folks have lost sight of in their false rage is the fact he said kcuf on stage. You clean up the N word matter and you STILL got a mess on your hands.

      • Miklonis

        Yep, in prime time. These guys should be more disciplined then that, but they’ll get there. Lebron has come a looong way from where he was, not shaking hands after losing the finals, etc… and now he’s like Bryant Gumbelesqe.

        • Sigma_Since 93

          “now he’s like Bryant Gumbelesqe.”

          Old school ball players hate that about new school ball players.

          • Miklonis

            The championship “sophisticates” those who win it. Though some won it and still acted like jerks, ie. Isiah Thomas and Dennis Rodman not shaking the the Bulls hand when the Bulls beat them.

          • Old school ball players hate everything.

    • Amber

      Where’s the tambourine

    • Wild Cougar

      They are not children. It’s not like toddlers that will repeat every thing they hear.

    • Question

      But what you’re talking about has more to do with “sell-out” behavior that exists in mainstream hip hop than any confusion that exists surrounding the n-word (btw – I hate the term sell-out, I just can’t think of another way to put it right now).

      There is something immensely pathetic to me about scions of 90’s hip hop pandering to a 20-something Canadian boy for his attention and acceptance by attempting to ingratiate him into a circle that he is only using to advance his career.

      Its like hearing TI defend Iggy Azalea – why are you crawling up her ass when she should be crawling up yours??

    • Question

      Separate but related point – its always funny to me when Black folks claim not to see a need to police their use of the n-word but do so unconsciously.

      The only people I’ve ever checked for use of the n-word have been my little cousins (e.g. running around Thanksgiving asking for their “N” to pass the gravy and whatnot). However, I’ve noticed that people don’t say it around me – people who I know for whom the word is a part of their daily I’m-around-my-people vocabulary.

      I was once walking in the Chi with my then boyfriend (now husband) and a 60 year old man in a Karl Kani denim suit, gators and a FUBU hat was like “ahh, look at my N and his beautiful lady, go ‘head my N” and before either of us had a chance to respond (no screw face, head turn, nothing), he checked himself and said “oh my bad, I need to watch my mouth…”.

      Point: Black folks police themselves with their own usage of the word so when people get on the “its just how I talk bandwagon” I always raise an eyebrow, because even we know better…

      • Miklonis

        I’m from Chicago, and a few years ago, that coulda been my grand-daddy in the FUBU suit…It is funny to me how people who rarely use the word–Champ included–vociferously defend the use of it when they’ve clearly outgrown it. Remember this scene from Chris Rock’s “I Think I love my Wife,” where his wife told him to stop using the N word round their kids? She said one day his daughter’s gonna come home with a friend, and that friend will ask, “who’s that on the couch?” And she’ll say, “oh, that’s just my nigga,” referring to her FATHER.

        If you don’t use it, don’t start. If you do use it, stop. But don’t be all theoretical about it and you are too sophisticated to use it yourself.

  • Madame Zenobia

    “What’s the first rule of ninja use?

    Make sure you’re a Black person first.”

    I nodded so hard at this, I almost hurt my neck. I’m one of those Black folks who doesn’t use the word except in EXTREME circumstances. (For example, a few weeks ago the dude my friend has been dating for a close to a year admitted that he might have a baby on the way by someone else. He got that word a lot that day.) This is a great post though. I agree with everything you said. Especially the don’t walk up with the “What’s up, my…” You don’t know me. You can’t call me that. My goofy cousin, who ain’t never gonna get right can. But YOU can’t. It is a nuanced thing, but the most important thing about using the word is: Be Black.

    My other (actual) problem with this incident is my biggest problem with college and professional sports – don’t stick a mic in a competitor’s person’s face 15 minutes after they’ve experienced a big loss or win (shout out to Richard Sherman). Or if you do, don’t act brand new that you get comments like this one. I’m all for people being poised and composed after a game but that’s not the reality. You’re hype, you’re emotional, you’re pumped up on adrenaline and you’re still in competitive mode. They are going to say things. I’m tired of the sports media machine – I’m looking at you ESPN – trying to make five day stories out of what everyone knows is a two minute situation. That’s why they use those super-sensitive mics, so they can catch comments like this one. I think it’s ridiculous.

    • Sigma_Since 93

      “don’t stick a mic in a competitor’s person’s face 15 minutes after they’ve experienced a big loss or win”

      I can’t ride with you on this one. When you goto Nationals in any sport, you have to do the press. Coach gets an opportunity to debrief with the larger team and coach is told who the press wants to speak with. The coach has the opportunity to get his players ready; especially after a loss.

      • Madame Zenobia

        I understand all of that. I know all of that. I still don’t like it. I hate that they go into the locker rooms in pro sports. I guess I’m like Marshawn Lynch. I don’t see the point. For example, I don’t need the press to ask Lynch directly after the game how he felt about not getting the carry on that last play of the Super Bowl. I can guess – he was probably pissed. I don’t need to hear how sad the Wisconsin players are directly after the loss. To me, those press conferences are just so the 5,000 sports journalists, writers and bloggers have something to push out an hour later.

        • ED

          Ratings. If the player explodes it becomes a story. ratings = dollars. These people aren’t thinking of anyone’s well being

          • Sigma_Since 93

            That’s why I fault the staff. If you claim to care about your players, you protect them and prepare them. This would not have happened with Coach T from Georgetown.

            • Calipari is stealing money. You think if he just wanted dudes to get ready for the league, he’d offer media training. He’s going to need it together his dreams.

          • Madame Zenobia

            That’s my point about them trying to catch these moments. If they have some good or bad sound bite they can play over and over again and analyze from a billion different perspectives it allows them to justify employing 50 talking heads to discuss every minuscule angle. But those pressers aren’t for the players or the fans. Those conferences are so the Skip Bayless’, Jalen Rose’s, Stephen A. Smith’s and Bill Simmons’ of the world can keep their jobs. True enough, sometimes a player can benefit from that hyped-up story, but that still doesn’t mean it’s necessary to the game.

        • Sigma_Since 93

          “To me, those press conferences are just so the 5,000 sports journalists,
          writers and bloggers have something to push out an hour later.”

          If folks didn’t click, there wouldn’t be a market. Same thing with celebs; why do I need to know Megan Good uses biodegradable toilet paper??? As long as we tune in, they will troll for a new angle.

          • Madame Zenobia

            Again, I get it. I don’t like it, it doesn’t interest me. Which is why I didn’t watch SportsCenter last night. I’m not reading all the blogs about who felt what, when and why. I haven’t been to espn.com or cbssports.com or however many thousands of blogs or sites there are out there for consumption. I watched the game. I saw who won and who lost. That’s what interests me. How Player A felt when Player B missed that one pass at that one moment in the game isn’t interesting to me.

  • As some a person who has on called a non black person “n***er” on multiple occasions I’m still assuming that wasn’t Kaminsky’s first or 6000th time being referred to as “n***er” due to actually playing a lot of basketball. He knows he can’t say it back but Frank has been called that before. Overall I think this is an inside baseball thing that just got picked up on a microphone.

    • Sigma_Since 93

      Question for the crew. Do instances like this where Frank has been exposed and probably is an honorary ninja in Black Wisconsin circles create future Ritchie Incognigto’s?

      • Nicholas Peters

        What black Wisconsin circles? have you seen their team…old Duke-ish

        • Sigma_Since 93

          In Madison amongst the black students, comprised of 85% athletes and 15% students, and in Milwaukee. I used to mess with a girl from around that way and was pleasantly surprised at the numbers. There aren’t many but more than I thought.

          • Someone I went to HS with, who is Black, went to school there. I think Bo Ryan would have been on SAE status if dude ever joined the ball team though. Talk about turnover PRONE…

            • Sigma_Since 93

              Wisconsin college sports are no joke. It doesn’t matter the level they can flat out play….from Whitewater to LaCrosse.

      • Since the Badger squad isn’t all that black his black circle(s) may be in non-NCAA settings. It can cause future Incognito’s assuming the white guy in the equation is a sociopath like Incognito. Then again if a white guy is going to call you that he probably didn’t need any prompting in the first place.

      • Amber

        I’ve always hated the idea of honorary blacks or so called ninjas. This happens in the sports world too often which usually sets many up for confusion.

        • Sigma_Since 93

          I happens in sports because of the commonality of cause; this dude works side by side with you daily helping you attempt to obtain a common goal. I’ll agree with @Miklonis:disqus where she said it’s a lazzy, sometimes universal, use which attempts to encompass too much.

          I’ve got some White cats that I’m that tight with that I would run through a wall for but I’ve never dubbed them ninjas…just my dude.

          • AlwaysCC

            a friend of mine from college reserves the term “homie” for those guys lol

        • Miklonis

          Here’s a clip from the Beiber roast. Try to watch this without cringing. It’s just something wrong with this: (Turn up the sound cuz it’s bootleg)

          https://youtu.be/QddoRW24Pn0?t=287

        • Val

          Yep and some fools keep trying to make Justin Beiber an honorary n@gro. I’m like, why? Because he tells ninja jokes? What is wrong with these fools.

          • Nicholas Peters

            #slumming….they have people who know Bieber’s people and Bieber needs black friends for his credibility

            • Val

              I don’t get why he needs the credibility though. His core audience is tween/ teen girls. He needs to cultivate them as they grow up.

          • HeyBooHey

            Apparently, he has an abundance of black people in his entourage, which is one of the requirements of honorary ni**adom

            • Val

              That’s a pretty low bar especially considering who the Black folks he hangs with are.

  • chivalrous1won

    Logical fallacy richie incognito. …I remember attending a poetry event in Miami around the time of the “occupy …” movement. …it was near downtown and some drunk ass white dude signs up on open mic and proceeds to recite a DMX song (rife with nigga usage) to a room full of black people….the hostess cuts him short and in what I guess was an attempt to save face….honestly I don’t know what she was attempting….singles me out in the 1st row saying “I could tell by your body language you were ready to jump buddy” to which I replied “why should I? You said it….I aint takin no charge for the team”

  • YAYA

    Soo.. about the backlash Kendrick Lamar is receiving for proposing to his longtime light-skinned girlfriend? Oh not the place? my bad…

    • ED

      It”s silly

    • Nicholas Peters

      did you expect less?

    • DiamondIsMyRealName

      I genuinely dont understand what this is about. can someone enlighten me? She (nor anyone else) can help her complexion, & they’ve been together since they were like 12 *exaggeration*, and she’s STILL black regardless of how light she may be…. I’m sincerely confused!

      • IsitFridayyet?

        I’m confused about where people found the extra time to care about her complexion.

        • cakes_and_pies

          Hurt girls who grew up to be hurt women because they were called all derivatives of “darkie” growing up. I’m so glad I’m basic brown.

          • Amber

            Basically. I’m a dark skin girl and was teased as a kid but i thank god for a good dose of SELF-ESTEEM and stable mental health. When I read about her all I could think about was that Kat Williams joke about self esteem. Folks need to stop basing their love of self on the actions and beliefs of strangers.

            • AlwaysCC

              me and my old manager used to joke about that kat williams joke allatime…usually around the time of my self-evaluation/annual review #iratemyselfhigh

            • Wild Cougar

              I have self-of-steam. It makes good tea.

        • HeyBooHey

          Ditto. I was more surprised that Kendrick had a boo all this time that he hid in plain sight, forget the fact that she’s light

          • @DragonflyJonez had the most insightful tweet.

            “Twitter confuses me. Why is everyone upset at Kendrick’s choice in women? He’s short and beardless. I thought he didn’t matter.”

            • HeyBooHey

              LOL!!! We should be worrying about the latest stripper Drake saved from a club in HoustAtlantaVegas. Beardless KDot isn’t worthy of such gossip fodder

            • Hilarious

            • perfect.

            • K Lust

              Facts

            • IsitFridayyet?

              But now he has money…..

              • Naw. Money can’t fix that.

      • Nicholas Peters

        Kendrick is the new head of pro black celebrities…the blacker the berry and he has openly stated that he preferred brown skin women…see how he switched models for one of his videos …because his fiancee is yellow there is a backlash from a small but vocal group of black women who feel duped and are calling him fake deep…etc…

        • DiamondIsMyRealName

          Ok he has a preference for darker skinned women, but if the woman hes been in love with for x amt of years has lighter skin….WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT AGAIN? I prefer my men to be a lot of things, but that doesnt mean squat when finding a husband… Yall know how it goes… Me: OK God, i WANT my man to be X, Y and all of Z. God be like… aiught ma I got you… he gone be A, B, C and Q cuz yeah… you NEED Q! lol smh @ the pettiness of today’s people.

          • K Lust

            Lmao @ Q. God be like “nah sistah, I got you. You aint ‘een know.”

            • DiamondIsMyRealName

              Right!!

        • h.h.h.

          and dont forget, Kendrick didn’t put any black women on the cover of his album… #PutItAllTogether #ItMakesSense

        • Lol, it’s not like he could’ve said he preferred light skinned women.

          But he does get into trouble though for being goofy. I’ve never understood the need to declare one’s preference, I think it’s an American thing honestly – people are way to concerned with your perceived “psychology”, more so than they are with what you’re actually doing. There’s a persistent, adolescent desire to catch people being phony: “If you say you prefer dark skinned girls, and I ever find you with a light skinned girl, I’m going to know you are a liar, hypocrite, manipulator, whose entire life is a lie…” That’s a childish way of thinking, doesn’t matter how oppressed/marginalized you are or aren’t.

          • h.h.h.

            I’ve never understood the need to declare one’s preference, I think it’s an American thing honestly

            do you think it’s moreso an American thing? or is just that certain people like to talk about themselves? (fwiw – i’ve been trying to not discuss my preferences)

            • Yes I do. American’s love to know what’s in other people’s heads, moreso than they like to observe simply what people do with our own eyes.

              People do like to talk to themselves naturally speaking, but in most cases, it’s irrelevant if it’s not backed up in action and no one really cares. In America, many people want to know what’s in your head so they can use it against you if it isn’t backed up in action.

          • cancergirl08

            “people are way to concerned with your perceived “psychology”, more so than they are with what you’re actually doing.”

            I have an associate like this and she is SO annoying. The older I get, the less patience I have to “explain” or “quantify” why I’m doing something.

          • It’s a cultural side effect of having Calvinists involved in the early founding of America. While we’ve moved past Puritanism, the mindset behind it exists.

            • Hmmm, I was leaning more towards Freud’s psychoanalysis. Why do you think it goes back to Calvinism?

              • Historically the Calvinists tendency has been about having your thoughts and deeds align. Particularly it was about having your faith in Christ match your outward manifestation of its worship. While it’s not the dominant mindset in American Protestant (except for the minor effects it had on the historical Mormon movemebt), through the social gospel, such an alignment is one of the foundational orientations of American sociology.

                • Just for clarity:

                  The Calvinists were a product of the reformation, where they contradicted the theology of the Catholic Church that one got into heaven by the performance of good deeds. Instead, it was believed that it was only by the grace of God that anyone had any chance to get into heaven…thus the concept of the Justified Sinner: where a person who had the grace of God, was justified in doing anything to achieve an end, since he already had God on his side.

                  The only way to know if one was of such an elite, was to invest all one’s life into one’s works: if a person was successful and became rich or powerful, they were of the elite and thus justified in doing whatever they did on earth. If they were not successful, they were of the damned and nothing could be done for them and the essence of society was to protects the elite from the damned, which was the majority. I think a lot of American pragmatism, which is the core philosophy of America is rooted in Calvinism, which was most prominent in New England, which is pretty much code for Harvard and Yale. And I’d agree with you that it is prominent, I just think it’s more prominent with the elite.

                  • Wild Cougar

                    I love you NL, but I saw clarity and Calvinists and elite and my eyelids got real heavy

                    • I actually meant the word elect instead of elite.

                    • Wild Cougar

                      *snores*

                • Simone-Elise Charles

                  I love you Todd, and have for at least 17 months. That. Brain.

                  • Thanks Simone! I know I’m late rolling, but it’s appreciated. If you wanna talk, the email is iluminati14@gmail.com ;-)

      • AlwaysCC

        according to the reports, the “activist” who started all this foolery thinks his fiancee isn’t dark enough to be down for the cause. and he has apparently lost credibility because he really just secretly wants to be with a white woman lol it’s sooo ridiculous i can’t help but laugh. i don’t even want to talk about it because i don’t want it to get any more attention!

        • DiamondIsMyRealName

          Foolishness and folly at its best… lawd!

          • Nicholas Peters

            and, because I love you, I give you Rashida Marie Strober

              • Nicholas Peters

                she needs a therapist…

              • Rachmo

                She has a lot of CAPS-y posts

                • Does she have a lot of EYE-y post?

                  • Rachmo

                    EYE took that as shade since I use EYE a lot. But in all seriousness she mentioned writing a book called “A Dark Skinned Woman’s Revenge.” It sounds like she may be a member of the “Who Hurt You Coalition.”

                    • Nicholas Peters

                      She is sort of cute…but her mentality…she needs help…and drives 100% of men away…and then blames it on black men…

                    • Pardon my lack of overstanding, ma’am.

                      Is “A Dark Skinned Woman’s Revenge.” a chocolate sisters version of Django or something?

                    • Nicholas Peters

                      The possibilities….

                    • Rachmo

                      You know I ain’t shyt so I’m actually delving deeper into this right? I found an excerpt and it reads like a scene from “Precious.” She will also disown her son Rahim if he doesn’t marry a Black woman. Oh God I’ve fallen into this rabbithole and can’t get out Wu.

                    • Nicholas Peters

                      Wait till you get to her youtube channel…it is gold!!!

                    • I’m sorry, Rach! I’ll send for help.

                    • Rachmo

                      I’ve pulled myself out after discovering that she tracked down a person who teased her in middle school and yelled at him after he admitted he didn’t know who she was. Good lord.

                    • AlwaysCC

                      i saw that her ex (husband? boo?) left her “for” someone who wasn’t dark skinned. i think he may have left her because she is a few fries short of a happy meal though…

                    • Rachmo

                      Hahaha @ your fries comment

                    • I think her happy meal just has the burger. No fries, no drink and definitely no toy.

                    • Nicholas Peters
                    • K Lust

                      This woman is the Captain of the Bitter S.S.

                    • TheOtherJerome

                      I can’t watch any of these all the way through. They’re kind of sad which makes it tough to watch. When she grows up a bit more in three years or so, she’s going to delete the h e ll out of these videos.

                    • There should be a listing of people who have been hurt by the Who Hurt You Coalition. Think of it as a way of solving crime. Though there would be some people with to be continued on their listing…

                    • K Lust

                      That listing would be big as hell. Like a phonebook.
                      But it would save so many lives.

            • DiamondIsMyRealName

              gucci, you dont love me! *side eye* smdh

    • I just want to say that some people need to stop acting as though every Black man that’s in a relationship with a light skin woman is color struck. As if the only possible reason a Black man would want to be with a light skin is because she’s light and that the only characteristic that light skin women have that makes them dateable/marriageable is the fact that they’re light skin.

      • Val

        Yeah and what would the alternative be? Light-skinned Black women being outcasts? The whole conversation makes less than no sense.

        • Nicholas Peters

          …and that is why I think some black people should be banned from interracial dating

          • Val

            Your comment requires a post to go along with it. We’ll be waiting patiently for said post.

            • Nicholas Peters

              from who..me…?

          • I agree. Some people ain’t got no sense when they date outside.

          • Wild Cougar

            My cousins keep making more lightskins withe Mexicans, and a lot of them, and they don’t take kindly to being told what to do, so…..

        • Medium Meech

          I think we actually do need to get rid of the light-skinned ones. We need to draw a line in the sand somewhere. Tolerance is great and all, but do we need to tolerate the oppressors encroaching on very blackness through biological warfare? The revolution will not be texturized.

          • HeyBooHey

            “The revolution will not be texturized”

            A very small piece of my inner being died when I read that. But really, light skinned-eds balance out the world. Plus, my niece and momma are of the lighter hue so what you won’t do is banish them from the black island. If they go, kappas gotta get left too

            • AlwaysCC

              i agree. #byej.a.p.a.n.

            • Medium Meech

              You assume this is a bad thing for them. They get to make a drake song their national anthem, their property values go up, and they get to put on sunscreen without having the rest of us judge them. It’s clearly a win win.

            • I’m all for banishing Kappas. Kappas suck. LOL

        • AlwaysCC

          i actually think we need to get rid of light skinned men (sorry PJ). they’re the real problem cuz #kappas

          • Medium Meech

            You started to lose me when you focused on men, I was O.K. with sacrificing panama even thoug that’s by dude cause tree of liberty..blood of patriots, omelets, etc… but the Kappa slander (we come in all colors)? Why is this becoming a thing on VSB?

            • AlwaysCC

              lol because damon hates Deltas. it’s all his fault. <—yes i realize that this argument is not logical at all.

          • uNk

            i dont approve of this light skinned shade you have hovering about you

    • panamajackson

      Can we really call this backlash if one random person on FB makes this claim? Perhaps I’m off, but I didn’t see anybody but this angry chick going in on him. THEN everybody going in on her in the comments of her original going in.

      Seems like not a single soul gave a sh*t but her…at least FB publicly. Also, I saw somebody refer to her as an activist. I see there must have been a firesale on definitions for “activist”.

      Next time I write an open letter to Comcast/Xfinit, one of y’all ninjas better start calling me an customer service activist.

      • Nicholas Peters

        If she makes enough noise by herself…can it be a backlash?…plus it is SOOOO funny

        • panamajackson

          I don’t think so. She didn’t make much noise. Everybody responding to her made more noise than she did. It’s the case of creating a panic where one doesn’t exist by virtue of the monumental response to it. It’s like how Soulja Boy became the fall guy for hiphop. He was just making music. Everybody’s response to him made him a higher profile celebrity than he ever would have been.

      • Val

        Exactly. Before this person spoke up all I saw were people congratulating him. We really have to stop letting one lone person steer conversations like this.

      • This is further proof that ignorant ish posted to social media shouldn’t always get shared. No need to make clowns famous.

        • Nicholas Peters

          I disagree…there is nothing to brighten up the beginning of a week than an idiot on twitter or facebook…I say give them their platform and let them entertain

      • Amber

        After I saw several sites refer to her as an activist I really had to go back and Google the word for a definition to make sure I wasn’t missing anything.

      • I saw a decent bunch of women with 1000s of followers start by questioning whether or not his girlfriend was Black before then trying to turn them into a talking point regarding colorism.

      • Rachmo

        I’ve decided I’m a Brunch Activist.

        • Nicholas Peters

          …but not a stiletto expert?

          • Rachmo

            Nope. #flatsgang

            • #DisappointedGang

              • Rachmo

                #shruglife

            • h.h.h.

              #MyCrewCantGoForThat #NoCanDo

              • Rachmo

                *sings* “Easy, ready, willing, overtime where does it stop where do you dare me to draw the line?”

              • Lea Thrace

                But why did I really just sing your’s and @rachmo:disqus’s comment out loud.

                #LovemesomeHallandOates

                • Cleojonz

                  ha ha, I knew there was a reason I liked you. I totally did too!

      • TheOtherJerome

        Can we really call this backlash if one random person on FB makes this claim?

        #Truth-TheOtherWhiteMeat

        I thought this was a deal until i found out this was just one person on FB with some followers. WTF??

        If thats the only criteria, then whats to stop, say, the Twerk Team from making news by Instagraming an opinion of Tidal?

    • She came off as a jilted fan girl who discovered her crush’s gal didn’t look like her.

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